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Woman Dies on AA Flight Due to No Medical Equipment

Woman Dies on AA Flight Due to No Medical Equipment

Feb 25th, 2008, 05:36 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
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I believe they said on the evening news there were 12 oxygen tanks on board and they all worked. Gekko, did you ever ride in an airplane? Did you ever hear how the oxygen will drop down in an emergency. Geez. Of course there are oxygen tanks on board a flight. And flights just like public buildings are often REQUIRED to have defibrillators.

AA also claims that the defibrillator was in working order, it just didn't work on her. I can hear it now --"a woman died on our plane. They tried to use a defibrillator but it didn't work and she died anyway." Next thing you know "the defibrillator wouldn't work", followed by "there was no defibrillator", and before long the story goes, "the woman was making so much commotion, they put a pillow over her face and suffocated her." Have any of you ever played that old rumor game called "telephone"?

NeoPatrick is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 06:25 PM
  #22  
GoTravel
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""Putting aside whether she had pre-existing heart problems (and I'm sure if someone suggested that the airlines have a right to prohibit people with pre-existing medical problems from traveling, they'd all be jumping up and down about their "rights",""

dmlove, the Captain of an airplane is a dictatorship and the FAA gives him/her that right.

When you buy a ticket, you are not guaranteed the right to fly.

If the Captain determines that your health risk will keep his flight crew from performing their regular duties, he/she can prohibit you from flying and there is nothing you can do about it.

The Captain surmises by taking care of your at risk healthcare, his flight crew cannot do their jobs putting the other passengers at risk.

This has happened many times.

So the person at the gate screaming about their extreme allergies and how they need to be in first class would most likely get banned from the flight.
 
Feb 25th, 2008, 06:50 PM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
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Of course there are emergency O2 tanks for the overhead masks in case of a cabin depressurization event.

But they are secure, not accessible to people on board.

Hand-held oxygen tanks for "sick" passengers are effectively bombs.

Gekko is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 07:08 PM
  #24  
 
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As KarolYu noted, an auatomatic defibrillator of the type carried on airplanes first senses if the heart is in fibrilation. If not, it will not administer a shock. Its function is in its name. Not administering a shock does not mean it was not working properly.

As far as administering oxygen is concerned, if the person is unable to breath, then oxygen will be of little use since it can't be properly inhaled. There are breathing masks for people in respitory failure where the person administering the oxygen will manually force the oxygen. In that case, the person administering the oxygen would know if the oxygen is flowing. The physician said he did not know if there was oxygen flow. That indicates the mask was not of the type necessary for a person in respitory failure.

Breathing difficulty, overweight woman in a cramped seat, probably not moving around much if at all. Embolism?
basingstoke2 is online now  
Feb 25th, 2008, 07:32 PM
  #25  
 
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My 1st thought as well. Obese, sedentary, hypertensive.

Embolism.

Neither O2 nor defibrillation would have made a difference.

But ambulance chasers will sue anyway.

Gekko is offline  
Feb 25th, 2008, 08:40 PM
  #26  
 
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Just a f/u..it appears the medcial coroner stated " death due to natural causes"

As another point, many may not know FYI, a medical person onboard has no duty to respond..absolutely none




1JAR is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 04:18 AM
  #27  
 
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Oxygen is not flammable.

It supports combustion, but in and of itself oxygen does not burn.
the_scarecrow_in_oz is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 04:38 AM
  #28  
 
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The Wall Street Journal article gives a more favorable accounting of the event, including why the initial request for oxygen was "refused."

http://biz.yahoo.com/wallstreet/0802...9_id.html?.v=2
DancingBearMD is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 05:02 AM
  #29  
 
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Gekko, I suggest you never fly again if you think every plane doesn't have oxygen tanks on board. And have you never seen a passenger carrying his own oxygen? Who said those tanks were "accessible" to the passengers anyway?

Meanwhile I'm entertained. Please explain how the oxygen tanks work as a bomb? This could be fun!
NeoPatrick is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 05:03 AM
  #30  
 
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Gekko, I suggest you never fly again if you think every plane doesn't have oxygen tanks on board. And have you never seen a passenger carrying his own oxygen? Who said those tanks were "accessible" to the passengers anyway?

Meanwhile I'm entertained. Please explain how the oxygen tanks work as a bomb? Does one hold a match under one and wait for it to explode? Does he drop it and expect the airplane to blow up? Does he throw it at the cockpit door and expect it to blow the door open? This could be fun!
NeoPatrick is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 06:04 AM
  #31  
 
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We flew in March and a medical emergency happened while the plane was on the taxiway. Oxygen (required to be on the plane by the FAA) was administered and eventually the person was removed from the flight by emergency responders who let our plane have it's oxygen bottle. The FAA said no, you do not fly with that bottle as it does not fit the holder on the plane and the plane will not leave the ground until the correct bottle is in place, full of oxygen. Two hours after shoving off from the gate we finally departed. The rules for oxygen on a plane are quite strict. I'll bet the AA flight had the oxygen bottles and they were full. Someone smells a bit of money and plans a lawsuit to get some.
rm_mn is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 06:32 AM
  #32  
 
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"I'll bet the AA flight had the oxygen bottles and they were full. Someone smells a bit of money and plans a lawsuit to get some."

Exactly, and how lucky they will be in court if they get a jury composed of people who have a grudge against AA, like the original poster clearly does.
"I always avoided AA if possible due to their horrendous customer service - but now I would never consider flying them." A quick judgment to never fly with them even before any accurate information is released. There's one vote for penalizing the "bad" airline with a huge judgement against them.
NeoPatrick is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 06:44 AM
  #33  
 
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Neo,
A compressed gas cylinder most certainly can act as a bomb.

That is why there are rigid standards for securement and transportation of gas cylinders (start with OSHA 29CFR 1910.101 general requirements for compressed gases).
And I imagine the standards for use on a plane are far more stringent.

If a cylinder is dropped and the valve is damaged, it can act as a torpedo and could certainly go through a cockpit door. A standard O2 cylinder could easily go through the fuselage.

No match required.

Queenie is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 06:57 AM
  #34  
 
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What percentage of the world's population die each day? Mutliply that percentage by the number of daily flyers, and its statistically likely that there will be airborne deaths. Why is anyone surprised at this?
thit_cho is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 08:39 AM
  #35  
 
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Yeah, what a mean trick that lady played on AA, to up and die on the plane so her family could sue.
follow_your_bliss is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 08:57 AM
  #36  
 
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Well, gekko and NeoPatrick, let's get the facts straight...

The cabin crew needs walk-around oxygen because they can't be tethered to a specific location in an emergency. Those are actual tanks with actual oxygen in them, and while O2 is explosive under the right conditions, they are hardly bombs.
The masks that pop out of the overhead are attached to oxygen generators...that's why the flight attendant's safety spiel tells the pax to pull sharply; you have to activate the oxygen generator, and if you don't pull you won't get oxygen.

Anyone remember the airline flight that caught on fire and crashed into the Everglades? The cause of the initial fire was improperly packed and prepared oxygen generators being carried as cargo to a service facility.

The greatest hazard oxygen presents to an airline passenger is not explosion, it is burns caused by heavy lipstick. Oxygen and grease of any kind is a bad combination.
Bobmrg is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 09:11 AM
  #37  
 
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Why is everyone so quick to blame the airline? We don't even know the whole, real story. We just flew AA to Maui and back, and had an emergency on our flight out AND coming back! Had never had this happen before, then twice in one trip. On the way out, the gentleman in the seat right behind me passed out. The poor flight attendant was extremely professional - let the pilots know, gave him oxygen, sat with him, asked for a doctor or nurse on board, etc. Turned out he was just overheated (and apparently this happens to him a lot, so why wasn't he better prepared?!?!), and even his wife seemed relatively unconcerned. They had paramedics waiting when we landed to check him over, even though he insisted he was fine. On the flight home, we heard another call for a doctor, then never heard another thing, so don't know what happened there.

I can't blame the airline, either for the gentleman on our flight, or for not commenting yet on the woman who died. In this lawsuit-happy country, anything they say can and WILL be used against them. Where's the PERSONAL responsibility? If I plan to fly, I take care of MYSELF, and expect the airline to take care only when something happens that's directly related to the aircraft or the flight conditions.
iowagirl is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 09:40 AM
  #38  
 
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What compassion Iowagirl. You do realize that no matter how much you take care of yourself, medical emergencies can happen. Something tells me if a family member of yours had an emergency on a flight and the airline failed to maintain equipment that it is required by law to maintain and that equipment may have saved your family member's life, your tune would change.

tom42 is offline  
Feb 26th, 2008, 10:02 AM
  #39  
dmlove
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tom42, I'm sure iowagirl and everyone's tune would change if that were in fact true. But there is some serious conclusion-jumping going on (regarding the availability of oxygen, administration of oxygen, availability of a working defribrillator, use of said defribillator, and in the end, whether either oxygen or a defribrillator would have made a darn bit of difference).
 
Feb 26th, 2008, 10:14 AM
  #40  
 
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I think people have an inherent need to "blame" someone else when something bad happens. Child has autism? Must be the vaccinations, it CAN'T just be an act of nature. Drowned in the ocean? It MUST be the government's fault for not stopping them from going swimming in the first palce.

If someone dies at home, does the estate sue the other family members who didn't prevent the death? Of course not. Yet, it the death happens anywhere outside the home, it HAS to be someone else's fault. I think people need to grow up.
bennyb is offline  

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