Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > United States
Reload this Page > Where is the best blue collar town in America?

Where is the best blue collar town in America?

Reply

Jun 7th, 2002, 06:26 AM
  #1
Blue
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Where is the best blue collar town in America?

I am tired of hearing about visiting cities in America that are more suited for elites and snobs tahn real Americans. The typical blue collar American is more interested in ribs than french food, monster trucks than classical ballet, professional wresling than opera and fishing over museums.

Where can a real red blooded blue collar American have a good time!
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 06:41 AM
  #2
Guy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Buffalo New York, that is a real mans town!
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 06:43 AM
  #3
meatand potatoes
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Oakland, California. Where a man can still be found doing an honest day's work for an honest day's pay.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 07:01 AM
  #4
ga
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Worcester, MA.

The home of Dr. Robert Goddard, inventor of the liquid fueled rocket, father of modern rocketry.

The home of Bob Cousy, surpassed only by Michael Jordan.

The home of Abbie Hoffman, founder of the 60's Yippie movement.

The home of the smiley face

Where the best restaurant in town, Mac's Diner, has a machine gun turret for a skylight.

Where the hospital lobby is nicer than any local hotel.

Where the birth control pill was invented at the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology.

In Paris, they planted trees along the river running through the city...in Worcester, we paved it over.

Also, affectionately known as Wormtown.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 07:32 AM
  #5
Eric
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I have to agree that the travel press and the people on this board are always hyping elite places for highly educated people. Have you really looked at the census recently. The average person makes $25,000 a year, drives a truck and has a high school degree at best.

They are interested in blue collar activities!
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 07:37 AM
  #6
lucy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
The difference being, you can find Budweiser, trailer trash and trucks in any city in the country. You cannot always find class and sophistication.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 08:27 AM
  #7
x
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
.....Pittsburgh,Pa.-----for blue collar and elite types..the melting pot..a good shot and a beer town...love our Steelers,Pens and Pirates.and also the ballet,symphony,and museums...and high balls and micro brew...oh ,and yes our Iron City Beer....a diverse town.I love this town....
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 08:34 AM
  #8
Bill
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
X is correct! Pittsburgh is the place to be! And the 3 Rivers Arts Festival opens this weekend in Gateway Center. You can peruse the outdoor artwork and crafts booths while slurping down a Pepsi and chomping on a pierogie and then head to Market Square for a great fish sandwich and an Iron City beer at the Oyster House!
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 09:58 AM
  #9
sandra
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Right on ga - Wuster was the first city that came to my mind. Your description hit the mark but I still like it. The new Massachusetts Viet Nam Memorial is in Green Hill Park - everyone should visit it sometime it's really moving and very well done.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 01:04 PM
  #10
beersy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
100% Milwaukee. If you like beer and sausage and walking by a beautiful lake with the sun shining on your belly, is there any other option?
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 01:24 PM
  #11
Luvitall
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I don't think there is any such thing as a "blue collar town". I think there are both "blue collar" and "blue blood" things to do in every town. Take New York for example: you can do cultural things such as the Guggenheim Museum or visit ultra gourmet restaurants and stay at the Ritz. You can also do blue collar activities like going to a baseball game or coney Island, eating at Pizza Hut and staying at the Holiday Inn Holidome. Rarely will you find a city these days that "only" has blue collar activities. For example Milwaukee was previously mentioned, I happen to know there are plenty of gourmet restaurants and a very nice art museum. Any city that doesn't have a mixture of both is probably not big enough to be a tourist destination.

I personally like a little of both. Our family never eats at fancy restaurants, rarely stays anywhere nicer than a Hampton Inn, but sometimes on vacation we go to pu-put golf and go-karts, other times we tour museums or see broadway shows. Not everyone on this board is an elitist or snob as you put it.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 04:15 PM
  #12
jason
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Luvitall

Very well said.

Interesting how quickly the notes on these boards promote stereotypes.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 7th, 2002, 04:21 PM
  #13
will
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
That's because it is much easier to embrace a stereotype than it is to actually learn or know something about people or anything for that matter. I have always found that young people and ignorant people embrace stereotypes more quickly than any other group. A classic example is racism. Rarely do you see an intelligent person embrace racism, the poster child of prejudice and stereotyping. Just watch any negative responses to this post and you will see an example of youthful ignorance.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 13th, 2002, 05:48 AM
  #14
Barry
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Streotypes are true 90% of the time. Blue collar towns have a distinct feel to them and that feel makes a blue collar person comfortable!

A blue collar will not feel comfortable in Beverly Hills or Palm Beach, or will a professional well educated person feel comfortable in a neighborhood where everyone drives a truck or works on an assembly line.

That is the truth!
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 13th, 2002, 06:34 AM
  #15
nomad
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
The only thing one needs to be "comfortable" in any place or town is to be comfortable with themselves. Embracing stereotypes only makes one feel better about themselves at someone else's expense. Whether they are true or not, stereotypes promote division and segregation which, in my humble opinion, is destructive. People are not so simple as to be classified that easily. Signed: a "highly educated" person from a "working class" background who loves to travel everywhere!
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 13th, 2002, 06:46 AM
  #16
gc
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Worcester, MA...a blue collar town...

A steel cutting town
An abrasives factory town
An old mill town at the head of the Blackstone Valley, birthplace of the American industrial revolution
Population, 105,000 +/-
Home of the Worcester Symphony Orchestra, as good as any in the country for a city of this size
Home of Mechanics Hall, a Victorian concert hall with unmatched acoustics...it is not uncommon to see Yo Yo Ma (sp?) in town recording there.
Home of the Worcester Art Museum, a world renowned institution
Home of Higgins Armory, the largest prrivate collection of Medieval armor in the world
Home of the American Antiquarian Society, one of the leading primary research institutions for American History
Home of Strand's ski shop, simply the best in the country

This message is not brought to you by the Worcester Chamber of Commerce. This message indicates that a blue collar town need not be bereft of culture.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 13th, 2002, 07:48 AM
  #17
Hank
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I doubt the true blue collar people (assembly line, garbage truck triver, fork lift operator, etc) are going to these cultural activities talked about above. At least not in great numbers.

They are at the monster truck races and WWF pro wresling next town over!
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 27th, 2002, 08:39 AM
  #18
gc
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Worcester, MA...a blue collar town...

Monster truck races and WWF(E) at the Centrum center
Home of the first Dunkin Donuts franchise
Home of the Summer Nationals, a custom hot rod free for all
Where Candlepin Bowling was invented in 1880 by Justin P. White
Home of Wormtown Rugby, The 2001 Division I New England Rugby Football Union Cup Champions
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 27th, 2002, 08:52 AM
  #19
TT
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Why is it that when people can only afford Budweiser, living in a trailer, or buying a truck that they are considered white trash? I have met trash that live in million dollar homes in Bev Hills and drink Dom. Let's not categorize people based on what they can afford and base it on what type of person they are.
 
Reply With Quote
Jun 27th, 2002, 08:53 AM
  #20
xxx
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
So what you are really saying is that the average American is:

Uneducated
A Slob
White-Trash or Black-Trash as it is suited
No interest in trying different things
No interest in being educated
 
Reply With Quote
 


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:01 AM.