What are your favorite regional U.S. foods?

Old Jan 15th, 2011, 08:53 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 39
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
What are your favorite regional U.S. foods?

I'm working on a section about food for the next edition of the Fodor's USA guide, and I'd like to get some input from the forums. Specifically, what are your favorite regional foods?

This is what I mean by "regional foods": dishes or types of cuisine that are strongly associated with a place -- foods you'd make a point to seek out when you visit a particular city or a region. Examples that spring to mind are lobster rolls in Maine, cheesesteaks in Philadelphia, mufaletta in New Orleans. (I have sandwiches on the brain at the moment. Lunchtime is on the horizon....)

Alternatively, if there's a particular regional food that you think is overrated -- that you sought out but were disappointed by -- I'd be interested in hearing that too.

Thanks for your help!
Matt_Lombardi is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 08:58 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,950
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Indian Fry bread
bigtyke is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 09:02 AM
  #3  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 39
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks, bigtyke.

I should add to my original post that it helps if you specify what place you associate the food with. I'm not sure, for instance, where I'd go to get Indian fry bread.
Matt_Lombardi is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 09:14 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 11,502
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
New Mexico is all about chile (not chili); in fact, it's one of our state vegetables. "Red or green?" is New Mexico's official state question, and "Christmas" (some of both) is the official state answer.

Hatch green chile is one of the best things you can put in your mouth, whether it's on a green chile cheeseburger or featured in green chile stew. Some of it is pretty spicy, but you can ask for mild chile on the side if you're concerned about heat levels.

Ripe red chiles are cooked, pureed, and seasoned into pure ambrosia. We add it to beans, used to marinate pork for fabulous carne adovada, and posole (a stew with dried hominy) wouldn't be the same without it.

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 09:20 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 11,502
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Indian fry bread is associated with the Native American reservations in the Four Corners area of the Southwest. It's somewhat controversial for some Native Americans, who see it as a symbol of oppression from the time when they were forced to leave their lands and eat Anglo foods. Others embrace it as a symbol of their ability to adapt to changing times.

It's not the healthiest food you can eat, but it's absolutely delicious with stew, as the basis for a "Navajo" taco (fry bread topped with beans, meat, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and green or red chile), or drizzled with honey.

In my earlier post, I should have mentioned sopapillas. The dough is similar to fry bread, but it's rolled out and cut into squares, then deep fried. They are served with New Mexican food - break it open, add honey, and enjoy. Besides being tasty, the sweetness helps calm your mouth when you're eating chile.

Lee Ann
ElendilPickle is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 09:20 AM
  #6  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 39
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Ah yes, Hatch green chile -- that's just the kind of thing I have in mind. It's been over a decade since I've been to New Mexico, but I still summon up a "taste memory" of it.
Matt_Lombardi is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 10:12 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 26,710
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
New York City

Pastrami sandwich
Knishes
Thin crust pizza
Black and white cookies
NY Cheesecake
Aduchamp1 is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 10:18 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 14,281
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Moravian sugar cake-Winston-Salem, NC
BBQ-Lexington, NC
shrimp and grits-Charleston, SC
fried green tomatoes-North and South Carolina and GA
pork chop sandwich at Snappy Lunch, Mt.Airy, NC
cmcfong is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 10:36 AM
  #9  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,087
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
New Mexico - sopapillas (would love to have one right now)
Maryland - soft shelled crabs
jamie99 is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 10:49 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 115
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Milwaukee - Frozen Custard (especially from Kopps)
Chicago - Deep Dish Pizza - (forget the local chains - Pequod's is my favorite)
nycuwsapt is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 10:53 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 3,160
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
So Cal....(It has been years but )Roscoe's House of Fried Chicken & Waffles

http://roscoeschickenandwaffles.com/
amsdon is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 10:55 AM
  #12  
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,039
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
For me, Texas is all about barbecue. While other states will argue that their barbecue is the best, there's really only one TRUE barbecue--Texas beef barbecue.
longhorn55 is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 10:58 AM
  #13  
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 27,867
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
From New Mexico:
Chile rellenos
breakfast burritos
DebitNM is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 11:02 AM
  #14  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Also for NYC - a real bagel and lox breakfast (not the fake Wonder bread bagels available in most of the country - but real bagels that are chewy and almost tough)

Also an egg cream - although there are few places to get them

For you in other parts of the country who think they are eating in New York delis - real delis - do not put butter or mayo on a sandwich, never serve chips (steak fries only) and always have real kosher pickles for free
nytraveler is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 11:26 AM
  #15  
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 5,545
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
There's nothing like Buffalo Wings from Buffalo and a lesser know Beef on Kummelwick sandwich...

The Kummelwick or Kimmelwick roll is a Kaiser roll with Pretzel Salt and Caraway Seeds on top ... inside is filled with hand sliced roast beef and often seasoned with Horseradish.... the sandwich was developed in the taverns near the heavy industries in Buffalo for steel, paper and factory workers who often only had a brief lunch break...

the abundant salt replenished the sodium lost through sweat on the lines, the caraway seasoned the beef and the beef filled the workers hardy apetite... the bartenders kept a large roast in a warmer behind the bar and sliced off the sandwiches in what would be considered one of the earliest "fast foods"... most often the sandwich was washed down with a cold beer or two or three in a matter of minutes as the workers cycled through on their breaks... today the sandwich survives as a local favorite and an homage to the industrial past of the Rust Belt worker... So good...
garyt22 is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 11:35 AM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,553
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Coffee milk! RI and by extension eastern MA
Del's lemonade in RI - have to get some every summer
ggreen is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 11:36 AM
  #17  
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,553
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
and always have real kosher pickles for free

But nyt, pickles don't grow on trees!

"Everyone's like 'Would it kill you to put a bowl of pickles on the table?' and I'm like, I don't see why I should have to give them away. We make them ourselves, and if people understood the time, patience, and skill it takes to make these things, they wouldn't complain that there's no pickles on the table. They'd understand why we charge six or seven dollars for a plate of assorted pickles."
http://newyork.grubstreet.com/2011/0..._on_trees.html

Ah, the new New York... sigh.
ggreen is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 11:39 AM
  #18  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 19,576
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Everyone I know from Southern California craves Mexican food when they return for a visit.
mlgb is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 11:39 AM
  #19  
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,553
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Ice cream in New England! Birthplace of everything from Steve's mix-ins and Ben & Jerry's to Friendly's. Local faves are Ericsson's (MA) and Gray's (RI) to name but two...
ggreen is offline  
Old Jan 15th, 2011, 12:05 PM
  #20  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 1,535
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Fried mullet - Upper Gulf Coast (Pensacola, FL/Mobile, AL)

Oysters (Apalachicola, FL)


Boiled peanuts - Deep South

Greens (turnip or collard or mustard) and peas (black-eyed or field peas) and cornbread - Deep South (especially for New Year's Day)


Steamers (whole clams steamed in the shell) - New England coast
(You can also get whole clams fried, as opposed to just clam strips)

Indian pudding (made with corn meal and molasses) and Grape Nut pudding - New England

Pizza actually has quite a bit of regional variety (at local pizza joints, not national chains) - New England style is different from New York style is different from Chicago style


Fish tacos - San Diego
Cranachin is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:28 AM.