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We plan to visit Ca,Ar,Ut +THE WAVE .We travel with our baby

We plan to visit Ca,Ar,Ut +THE WAVE .We travel with our baby

Old Jul 14th, 2013, 09:14 PM
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Toadstools.
The road to these is close to the Ranger station where you need to pick up your Wave Permit.

You know there are two Waves areas? The second, Big Wave, requires 4-wheel drive due to sand. Most people to don't go there. The Big Wave is huge, but not as compact as the more popular small Wave. Shorter walk.

Back to Toadstools. High Clearance Vehicle required. Directions are slightly confusing so here is the location
N37 09.799 W 111 42.642.

Vaga
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Old Jul 15th, 2013, 10:39 AM
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I did see this news in the Salt Lake paper. It was uber hot, they got dehydrated. This is why the desert is dangerous and you can never have too much water with you. (yes, you can drink too much but you can't have too much) Unfortunately, deaths like this happen with regularity in desert areas. I think people just have no idea how dehydrated you can get. We had one of the hottest Junes on record here. I was drinking 1.5 GALLONS of water a day just because the heat sucked any moisture right out of you--it was 104 degrees and that was in Salt Lake. Down south would be even hotter and DRYER. Its not the heat, its the lack of humidity. Very sad outcome for these poor people.
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Old Jul 15th, 2013, 12:07 PM
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Lack of Humidity is a good thing when it is hot. The more humid it is the higher the heat index and more dangerous it is.
I own sanitation company(garbage/trash). What is unusual, is this is the mildest summer we have ever had. We have only had 2 days reach 100. The past 3 days have only been high 80's.
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Old Jul 16th, 2013, 02:39 PM
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Lack of humidity actually can fool you into not understanding how dehydrated you are since your sweat will evaporate away without your realizing it. When you are dripping with sweat you kind of remember you need to put some of that water back in. Also it isn't just hydration, but electrolyte balance that is important. Remember you sweat out salt as well and need to replace it with salty snacks.

Very, very sad about the couple. Makes me wonder if they will adjust the lottery on extra hot days.
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Old Jul 16th, 2013, 04:16 PM
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I don't get the idea of how the lottery could have caused this. I keep reading it everywhere. Lets say the couple had actually been able to get a reservation(whatever you want to call it) 3 months in advance in what I call the first lottery. I bet they still would have gone in about any condition. This is similar to those in a slot canyon knowing that it might rain. Or lighting on Halfdome, Longs Peak, Grand Tetons, etc. People take risk that aren't in their favor. (Since I am in Oklahoma for the past 45 years and experience one of only a handful of F5's to hit the state-Storm Chasing has never made any sense to me either. We all know when they are coming in the days we now live in. I don't see why there are 50-100 "professional chasers" and hundreds of others out trying to get a photo or recognition. I don't think they are actually doing very many people a service). I might be tempted to do the same, but everyone is just getting way to close. When you start measuring your distance in feet instead of mile, just crazy.

I totally disagree about humidity. A quick google didn't lead me to any dangers related to High Temperature and Low Humidity(plenty of fire danger though under those conditions). Higher humidty is much more dangerous because you sweat more and it is leaving your body faster. The evaporation process at lower humidity actually cools your body. Yes, you should drink. I am out in high temps and high humidity every day. We drink 3 or 4 parts of water to 1 part of gatorade or powerade. Frankly, we think Powerade is better and we try to avoid the G2 or substitute sugar stuff. We have nothing to base that on other than the way we feel. This is on a Garbage truck with no AC at temps usually 95-105 in the hot part of the day. Almost always, you can add 10 degrees to indicate the heat index.

I like what accuweather has now. That call it the REALFEEL. This takes into account Temp, Humidity, Wind Speed, Clouds, Sun angle, etc.
I still don't understand Relative Humidity, Absolute Humidity, and Specific Humidty.

A person just has to know their limits. This was what I was trying to make my point about in my very first post here years ago. Bottom line 3 people have been killed in the past 3 years on what is probably the most regulated hike in US. I was trying to make the point that I don't think it was the right thing to take a toddler on this hike. I should add that it seemed the OP didn't know much at all about the hike nor had any experience. That was my concern.
You can say this about many things. Kayaking, Hiking, etc. Don't start out on something that is difficult. Work your way into it.
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Old Jul 18th, 2013, 08:08 PM
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The hike itself isn't that strenuous. As long as you don't get lost and you do the hike when it is cool and you carry plenty of water. I know lots of people who take their kids on all sorts of backcountry adventures. I didn't and still don't. It's not a risk I am willing to take. But lots of people do. And, in reality, anybody is more likely to get injured/die in a car crash driving to the hike (or to work for that matter) than they are to get injured/die hiking. It's just that the hiking ones make the news.
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Old Jul 19th, 2013, 12:25 PM
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>

Not sure where you have heard that, but it is not what I have heard. You may feel cooler in low humidity, but the danger is that you don't realize you are still sweating and losing hydration, so you don't replace it. Heat stroke deaths happen in the dry heat every year
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Old Jul 19th, 2013, 01:36 PM
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I googled "is low humidity dangerous"
Heres what I got:
It is dangerous in the winter
It is dangerous to your piano and guitar
It can dry out your nose or throat
It poses a higher fire danger


I then googled "is high humidity dangerous"
Everything indicates that high humidity and heat is dangerous to your body.

I'm not debating that either can certainly be bad. I'm saying that the higher the humidity the worse it is. I think 103 with a humidity of 80% is worse than 108 degrees with 20% humidity. It's very rare where I live for it not to be high humidity. All of these Moisture Wicking shirts that are now available are surely a blessing. The faster you get the sweat off the faster you cool. Yes, replenish replenish replenish.

I think I misworded my statement. Higher humidity makes it harder for sweat to leave your body. At lower humidity the evaporation process is more effective.

I also googled Heat Related Deaths. It seems that Arizona does indeed have the highest incident rate. So perhaps I'm totally wrong in my way of thinking. The 2 things that I got on that website were the fact that most people also have cardio problems that have heat related illnesses and that heat related health issues normally happen during heat waves. I think it would also be safe to assume that Arizona is one of the warmer places for the entire summer. Where I live it is typically hot mid-June through end of August.

I just know what I've seen on local media here for years about high humidity and heat. I guess someone living in Arizona hears about low humidity and heat. I'm sure the media outlets in either area play up either for all it's worth.
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Old Jul 20th, 2013, 09:02 PM
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>

That is most likely true. You can die in dry humidity just as often as high humidity if your body temperature goes too high and becomes unregulated.
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Old Jul 24th, 2013, 09:07 AM
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Just read that another death happened recently at The Wave. That's 3 people within 30 days and 4 within the past year or so. Statistically, that's super high.

Back to the original OP. Heat wouldn't have been a factor in November. However, taking a toddler on a hike like this(still what I considered the OP to have very little hiking experience-not to mention what are the odds of getting a permit). I'm glad the OP left toddler behind and made it out fine from the wave.

This is still a hike that I plan on doing. But, with any hike, be smart and know what you are getting yourself into. The OP was not exhibiting that, IMOP.
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Old Jul 24th, 2013, 09:09 AM
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The latest death happened this past Monday.
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Old Jul 24th, 2013, 06:43 PM
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See today's Salt Lake Tribune, there was an article on all of this. The BLM is considering some additional safety measures. I honestly hope they don't increase cell coverage--that only encourages people to rely on cell phones when they shouldn't. Trail markers, if small, would be helpful. But these people started this hike at 8am. Should have started at 6 am. When I have hiked out of the Grand Canyon in April, we start at 5:30 am--that's on the trail! It has been so hot here. And the difference with humid heat is that the water is not sucked out of you the way it is in the desert. This woman had a gallon of water with her. In 100 degree heat, I would have had 2 gallons and started at 6am. The hike isn't the issue--it's the heat. And people truly underestimate the desert.
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Old Jul 25th, 2013, 06:30 AM
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The couple got lost as well and spent more time than they'd planned hiking ito the hottest part of the day. I'm sure the stress of being lost was also a factor. They say her legs gave out (?) but there's no mention of whether they ran out of water...very sad.
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Old Jul 25th, 2013, 07:47 PM
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They were from Arizona so you would think they know about heat...
So very sad.
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Old Jul 26th, 2013, 07:06 PM
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InSandy--I can't tell if they were from AZ or Colorado?? Either way, I thought the same thing as you. Very sad--they have very young children.
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Old Jul 27th, 2013, 05:23 AM
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The article that I read stated that they were from Mesa AZ so they were familiar with a hot desert environment.
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Old Jul 27th, 2013, 11:03 AM
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That just seems odd then--I wonder if she had some underlying medical issue or was on a medication that made the heat more impactful. Still so sad.
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Old Aug 23rd, 2013, 01:44 PM
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Haha, you are still talking about our baby going to wave...there was no really need to take her there, but also it would have been no problem to take her. It was an easy walk. Next time she will walk by herself.

I just wonder about that there is still talks about that.

better enjoy her photos:

https://plus.google.com/photos/10575...7620123/albums

Greetings from Austria



anyway since my Iran stamp in my passport get so much attention at US imigration I try to avoid the north of your continent until its expired.
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