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Southern USA and hurricane season

Old Apr 27th, 2019, 03:47 AM
  #1  
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Southern USA and hurricane season

Hi All

I'm planning a trip for Sep/Oct 2020 to the US from Australia.

We wanted to spend a few weeks in the southern states (TX, LA, MS, AL, GA SC) before heading north up the east coast.

I understand hurricane season runs from Jun to Nov and Sept may be considered peak hurricane season.

Is this something we should be seriously considering (or am I over thinking it? Much like people think our beaches are overrun with great white sharks - when in actual fact they're still pretty rare ).

I don't think I'm too worried as I figure it will be what it will be - I can't control the weather after all or predict it. However, hubby is a little more concerned. I'll make sure we have insurance in case our plans do go astray.

Thanks
Rellie
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 05:19 AM
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Just get trip insurance and don't overthink it. I live smack on the coast of Fl and we never know when or if we will get a storm.
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 06:15 AM
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Statistically, the risk of encountering a hurricane during that time period are small. On average the southern and southeast coasts of the US mainland get hit by 7 hurricanes every 5 years (that's an average of 1.75 each year) of those 3 can be categorized as "major" storms dropping the average to .60 storms every 5 years. The following two charts may help you understand the small level of risk you take traveling in the states you mentioned during September and October:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...tes_hurricanes

https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/E19.html

Personally, I wouldn't worry about it very much as it is very akin to your great white shark theory.
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 06:48 AM
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You know what "assume" means--and with hurricanes it could be ANYthing. Charlotte is 200 miles from the coast where Hurricane Hugo hit land--and we had a hurricane here.
BUT buy trip insurance so if something does happen you can alter your plans and be reimbursed for it. I would never go to the beach (where I pay for the rental) in August and September particularly) without insureance. And most rental agencies will recommend it, IMO.
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 07:41 AM
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https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/climo

Last edited by Dukey1; Apr 27th, 2019 at 07:44 AM.
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 07:45 AM
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The peak of storm occurrences is around 10 September and that tapers off slightly until around October 10-20th or so

Please remember that the greatest amount of disruption usually occurs near the landfall point as opposed to further inland
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 11:58 AM
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While that is true about landfall, (I guess you are referencing my 200 mile thing), tell that to eastern NC where parts are still recovering from Fran years ago. Don't forget the flooding and rains that come with it.
SO my point IS don't overthink, as others have said but get trip insurance, which you should do anyway for a trip of this length and distance, hurricane season or not.
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 12:28 PM
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One somewhat good thing about hurricanes is that you usually have advance warning like a day or two, unlike the earthquakes we get here in California. So you can check TV or radio for updates as well as the NOAA site Dukey provided.
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Old Apr 27th, 2019, 10:18 PM
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Thanks so much for all your replies, I appreciate it. Good to hear we don't need to be too worried about as I'm super excited about finally get to the US.
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Old Apr 28th, 2019, 07:25 AM
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Don't worry too much, but do keep up with the weather forecasts while you're in the area, and be prepared to come up with a Plan B if you're unlucky. Be aware that while predictions are better than they used to be, hurricanes can change direction and the cone of probable landfall can be large. Also, they can be hundreds of miles across, so as Gretchen points out, you can feel the effects a good ways inland - high winds, heavy rain, tornadoes and flooding.
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Old Apr 28th, 2019, 10:29 AM
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What others have said about hurricane effects above are unfortunately very true. When the season begins on 1 June I start watching various hurricane tracking sites on YouTube and elsewhere. These storms are one of the downsides of living in places like South Florida.
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Old Apr 29th, 2019, 01:29 AM
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Southern USA and hurricane season

The Atlantic hurricane season is a time when most tropical cyclones are expected to develop across the northern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently defined as the time frame from June 1 through November 30, though in the past the season was defined as a shorter time frame.
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Old Apr 29th, 2019, 04:40 AM
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That "past" has obviously ended. It is unfortunate that it takes outright destruction for some people to realize and react appropriately for the future.
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Old Apr 29th, 2019, 05:34 AM
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Another consideration is the normal weather. I would opt for October rather than September on the grounds that it may be cooler and drier. Summer in the SE US lasts a long time and is very hot and very humid. Walking outside can be like walking into a Turkish bath.
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Old May 2nd, 2019, 03:31 PM
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I agree with the others. Plan your trip as you want and get trip insurance and perhaps have a plan B in your back pocket.
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Old Jul 31st, 2019, 05:58 AM
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overthinking this. trip insurance is fine, but don't give it another thought.
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Old Aug 1st, 2019, 09:50 AM
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Here are 2 sites you can use to keep an eye on any hurricanes during your trip.
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/
http://stormcarib.com/
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Old Aug 1st, 2019, 10:48 AM
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And right now there are two storms; hopefully neither of which will do more than drop a lot of rain.
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Old Aug 1st, 2019, 11:15 AM
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My grass could use more than a drop. Large black clouds to the north of me, but so far no rain
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Old Aug 1st, 2019, 12:33 PM
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I was ready to board the Ark yesterday (Clermont, just west of Orlando). Some of my plants look so drowned that they might not come back, I fear. Up in Tavares they were reporting 5.5 inches, and the storm had only gone on for about an hour at that point. Feast or famine..
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