Roadtrip in the deep south in August?

Old Jan 3rd, 2015, 03:39 PM
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Old Jan 3rd, 2015, 04:31 PM
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Starrs - you LIVE there. You HAVE to endure it/function. The OP presumeably wants to enjoy their trip. Most up thread think it is a bad idea. Yet you pick me out to insult. Go jump in a . . . And take your passive aggressive with you.


I have dear friends in North Carolina and in Washington DC and have visited all over the SE in summer. It can be gawd awful. Even my friends taking me around melt.

Just because you are acclimated - don't think others will enjoy it.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2015, 04:55 PM
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Right. NO one comes to the SE for vacation in the summer. No one. Stay away. Terrible idea!
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Old Jan 3rd, 2015, 05:24 PM
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Love ya, Starrs, but you don't live in the Deep South, you live in the Piedmont or in the mountains, areas I specifically recommended to the OP.

You don't have Deep South humidity or Deep South heat. My grandmother, and my parents later, who lived very near you didn't even have air conditioning.

No one said the OP shouldn't go to the Southeast, just that going to the Deep South could be unpleasant for those who are not used to it. They are very different places.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2015, 10:14 PM
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When I saw this post title I immediately thought that someone would have to pay me a LOT of money to tour the Deep South in August. Seriously it would take at least 500,000! I've been to NC in Oct, Tn various times, and Va once in Nov.

I live in the desert climate of Utah by choice. I do not do humidity. That's why I visited Sicily in April,May.

thurdsdaysd, I didn't know you lived in NC. For some reason, I thought you were British!

Sorry but yes I think you are bonkers. August is the perfect time to visit the nalt parks in the Rocky Mtns, not the Deep South.
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Old Jan 3rd, 2015, 10:48 PM
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Dayle - I was born and grew up in Britain, but I've lived in NC for a long time. I would say I am still not aclimated, though, lol.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 04:20 AM
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Well, obviously we need to take a poll of everyone who has had visitors from the UK and those UK folks who live here to tell mamabear what to do. The die is cast. Nothing else matters.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 05:09 AM
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I agree with kayd. The most miserable, hot and humid day ever on a vacation was in Virginia and Washington, DC in 1962. Our car didn't have a/c, the heat was oppressive. I remember that day distinctly. Horrid.

I agree with Gretchen. If there is a hell, it has to feel like a subway platform in NYC in the summer. Hot, stale, non-moving air, rivers of sweat pouring.
NYC in the summer can be horrid.

Talk about hot and humid air. Coming back to a B&B in Provincetown, MA. The inn didn't have a/c and I was certain there was no way I would be able to fall asleep. There was a little window fan and it moved enough air to finally fall asleep.

Ack, not sure what you are saying. I don't think you know where I live. I live in the middle of cotton country. My grandmother grew up picking cotton. The big mule barn is on a nearby corner where the sharecroppers gathered up early in the mornings to hitch up the mules to work the fields. My neighbor's house is "planted" in a 5 acre lot which up through my childhood was a cotton field. My grandfather's car's paint was pitted forever by a careless crop duster. If cotton country isn't "Deep South", I don't know what is. I remember summers here without a/c. The place in the mountains doesn't need a/c. That's a huge difference from summers in the midst of cotton fields.

I've worked the southeast for business and have spent 90% of time in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia and Florida. Believe me, I know summers in the "Deep South".

Are they like summers in the UK. No. Who said they are?
Do visitors from the UK come to the area for vacations during the summer? Yes. Do they survive? Yes. I keep thinking about all the visitors heading to Walt Disney World and the other parks built on thousands of acres of inland orange groves that Walt built. No ocean breezes. Hot and humid summer weather. What in the world was Walt Disney thinking?!?!

mamabearUK, have a good trip wherever you decide to visit. I will go on record that you can enjoy an August vacation along the route you suggest. You may be scared off your trip now and IMO that would be a shame. Just keep in mind, that you experience similar heat and humidity anywhere up the eastern seaboard in August. We walked from the 90s to Central Park South one August day and we knew it was hot. We didn't realize it was 104 degrees. Just as we hit CPS the skies opened up and we barely made it into Mickey Mantle's restaurant. We spent hours there, waiting for the rain to subside. We had a good time but summers way up in NYC can be just as hot and humid and wet. Just like Hawaii or every tropical place I've ever visited, you can expect an afternoon thunderstorm - usually about 4pm - when the "humidity" builds up enough to fall as rain. Every other year I spent a week at an AZ resort - because rooms were so cheap. Folks can tell you that 100+ temps aren't "bad" because it's a "dry heat". I can tell you that we did any outdoor activities in the morning because, dry heat or not, it's hot. I have a photo of myself, shivering and wrapped up in my pareo, after leaving the pool on an 114 degree day. The water evaporates off one's skin the chill effect is something I've never experienced. Cousins from TN spend several months a year in Tucson, AZ and the wife never leaves the condo because the heat is so oppressive.

The US is a big country and the weather can vary widely as well. Yes, the heat and humidity combo can be something in "the deep south". But that same combo can be found in many states outside of the "Deep South" in August and heat without humidity in the west can offer different challenges.

Good luck and happy travels!
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 05:32 AM
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Your route in August based on historical averages =
August 1 - Nashville TN - 90/70
August 4 - Memphis - 92/74
August 7 - Natchez - 95/74
August 10 - Lafayette - 93/75
August 13 - New Orleans - 91/78
August 16 - Seaside, FL - 89/76
August 19 - Savannah GA - 90/72
August 22 - Charleston SC - 86/76
August 25 - Asheville NC - 82/62
August 28 - Dillard GA - 83/60
August 31 - Atlanta GA - 87/68

Source = http://www.accuweather.com/en/us/atl...weather/348181

I added in Seaside FL, because you really should enjoy at least one day on the sugar sand beaches of the Gulf of Mexico. Any place along www.30a.com would be great!
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:08 AM
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Sheesh, no one is saying don't EVER visit the south. I agree that anywhere east of the Mississippi and below about 2,000 feet is likely to be unpleasantly humid in the summer, which is why I'm considering moving west. But if you have a choice there are better places to visit in August, and better times to visit the south.

How long a period do those averages cover? Things have been heating up. And averages disguise the fact that it can be 100 in, say, Memphis, in August. (That was last year's max in Memphis.)

But the OP seems to have abandoned the discussion.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 09:26 AM
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No guys still here....enjoying the debate tbh. Had a chat with the family and we're up for the trip, will just need to schedule activities accordingly and book hotels with a pool! So, smokey mountains is a must? Is Layfayette worth visiting if we are staying in NO and staying in a plantation house? Anyone have must do activities? Thanks for all your input guys, here to help if you ever want to visit Devon in the UK.....much cooler!!!!
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 09:28 AM
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Starrs thank you for your homework.....humidity not an issue in UK but have been to the far east so have some idea.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 11:07 AM
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My only visits to the south have been during the summer. About five years ago my son and I went to the Huntsville Botanical Gardens on a 90 degree day. I'm from a dry climate and I don't do well in humidity so after about an hour I needed shade. We found a children's play area where I could sit and my son could play. A local grandfather started talking to me, and I was a bit embarrassed because I looked horrible. Frizzy hair, sweaty and red-faced. I felt like I was melting. After talking for a bit he asked where I was from. When I replied Denver, he said "oh, that makes sense." I still laugh when I think about it.

Two years ago, I was in Nashville, walking around downtown and again I made it about an hour before I headed to a restaurant and drank about 4 - 5 glasses of sweet tea in about 15 minutes. Then back to the hotel for a nap to recuperate.

Fortunately, when I returned to Nashville last summer it was much cooler and easier to be outside.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 12:14 PM
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I personally think you'd be OK, just be sure to check the weather every single day, and of course make sure that the a/c works in your car. You may also want to get trip insurance.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 01:05 PM
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"How long a period do those averages cover? Things have been heating up."

I don't know. Ask Accuweather.


"And averages disguise the fact that it can be 100 in, say, Memphis, in August"

"Disguise the fact"?
Not for anyone who knows the definition of "average".

Sure it can be 100 in, say, Memphis, in August.
It can also be 70 in Memphis in August.
Hence the concept of "average" temps.

Today it's over 60 degrees in Atlanta. Last night was warm enough for no jacket. It felt like a spring evening. Today is nice and warm and it finally stopped raining. Schools start again tomorrow after the holiday break.

A year ago we were heading into record colds and schools did not open because it was too cold. Too cold to be sure the buses would run, the schools would have heat without broken pipes and they didn't want kids to wait at bus stops in sub-freezing temps.

Which is the "right" answer for "What is the weather in Atlanta on the first Monday in January?
The "right answer" is, it varies.
It can be spring-like temps (today) and it can be record-setting low temps (last years).
What's the best guess? The average temp. Will that be the actual temp on that day for the forecasted date made days/weeks in advance.
Hint: it's not really a forecast; it's a listing of the average temps.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 01:10 PM
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"Is Layfayette worth visiting if we are staying in NO and staying in a plantation house?"

Personally, I'd say "no". I wasn't sure why you wanted that many days in that section of the country, but I'd spend fewer days there and that would give you more time in the mountains.

The good thing about the mountains in August is that you don't have to deal with the high temp/high humidity combo. Cooler temps and much less humidity. As I said before, I don't have a/c in my mountain place in north Georgia. I also have an extra supply of flannel shirts and sweaters and a throw on the back of every chair. People think that, because it's August in Georgia, the weather must be miserable. It's actually closer to Devon than NOLA. Which is the point Ack was making. He's right about the mountain part of it.


"...here to help if you ever want to visit Devon in the UK.....much cooler!!!!"
I hope to take you up on that one day.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 02:14 PM
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Okay, I'll be the killjoy. Truth needs to be told.

Taking a 3 week vacation throughout the South is doable but not very enjoyable. They can plan a wonderful trip only to feel miserable and hate the whole thing.

I live in the South and I walk to the mailbox and come inside drenched and begging for a/c and a cold drink. We have a lovely zoo in my town...would I think abut visiting it or taking my relatives there during August? Ummm NO! Kids would be cranky and Grandma would have a heatstroke. Teens wouldn't care to see the monkey cage if it meant walking one more step. Sure, we could step into the shade and rest but there would be no relief from the humidity. You sweat and are dripping wet and there is no cool breeze to dry you off. Only more humidity to keep you sopping wet. Your body is pumping more blood around to cool your inner core and you are losing salt and electrolytes like there's no tomorrow. I guess we need to spend another $45 for another round of liquid for our clan or the heat exhaustion will become real. The first sign of dizziness or nausea means day is over and you need to get inside some a/c.

You can check the weather or your car a/c but what good is that? No one is spending 3 weeks in their car. And do we even need a meteorologist in the South? It will be hot. Hot and muggy with a 100% chance that the heat will build up enough by 2-4pm to create torrential thunderstorms. It might only rain 10 minutes, but you can plan on it. Everyday.

If the OP wants to see the Deep South and likes to drive to places where they can have respite from the heat, then they should go for it. Just plan ahead and be prepared. Do indoor activities until sundown. Know the symptoms of heat exhaustion. Purchase those gel cooling rags as silly as they look, they work. Look for a hotel with a pool. Indoors would be better. Be prepared to change your plans and maybe take in the Appalachian mountains/Asheville area and drop New Orleans if you find a dislike to the heat. Don't change your dream. Just listen to good advice.

Good advice like drink 64oz and reapply sunscreen even if you are staying indoors. You might sit next to a window

There are people who visit the North with all its snow and frigid temps. Is it cold? Yes, but they wear layers and plan a few nights by the fire. Just have a good plan and enjoy your trip!
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 02:30 PM
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Well it looks like sta
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 02:38 PM
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Oops - my mini slipped out of my hands and posted 'mid post'.

Well, it looks like Starr's has won out (let it be on your head)

Mammabear: you say you 'know' humidity because you live in the UK. No, that is not what we are talking about. I lived in England for 5 years, and yes it is humid . . . But it is nothing like the Deep South. I've been to Hong Kong and Bangkok and yes, they are hot and humid . . But not like the Deep South.


Please re-read all the posts from people who actually live in the area who would not take this trip.

After all that, if you still decide to go, fine. But don't say you haven't been warned.

I have a friends from England and Ireland who when they have visited the south in summer have barely left their hotel rooms because the melt outdoors.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 02:56 PM
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I'll go back to my point about when you are touring you can put up with some uncomfortableness--being cold in Minnesota, being hot in the South. You are there for a "little while"--and you are in and out of places that will ALL have AC (and I can remember the first AC in a Winn Dixie in Chapel Hill in the 50's that I ever felt!!).
It's a trip with some incredible places to see and enjoy. Letting people who are dissatisfied with where they NOW live is just not the way to plan, IMO.
Their first line said--seasoned road trippers. They LIKE to travel. They now have ALL the nay saying that could be done. And have decided to come. I'm glad. The US is HOT in many many parts. It's the latitudes, people!!
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