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Portland Oregon: Top Ten Reasons to Live (or not live) There?

Portland Oregon: Top Ten Reasons to Live (or not live) There?

Old May 3rd, 2005, 10:42 AM
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Yes, meth is alive and well in several states. Terrible.

BTilke, is "spendy"' and "tennies" a British thing? I think I just used the word "tennies" the other day...was that a beeeg faux pas?
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Old May 3rd, 2005, 11:51 AM
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Al LaCarte,

Have your ruled out the Seattle area? It is a lot more expensive than Portland, but is a lot bigger city with a lot more going on. I think Portland is more family friendly, but since you don't have kids at home, you might want to consider Seattle, too.

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Old May 4th, 2005, 08:05 AM
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Orcas,

I must admit to loving Seattle; however, the fact that it is quite "spendy" (sorry, couldn't resist!) is one of several reasons I have pretty much ruled it out. Of course I have been to Seattle a few times and never been to Portland, so I am reserving my final decision until I get there later this year (and then, perhaps, return in Jan/Feb as Gardyloo suggested.

Other factors influencing this decision include the fact that my producing/directing/writing partner will be moving to the same area as myself, so we needed to pick an area that both he, his wife and myself all liked, on several different levels. This is also why we are very interested in the film scene up there.

Thanks again for your input and suggestions. Feel free to comment further!

AL
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Old May 4th, 2005, 09:31 AM
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Al !!
There was just a segment on CNBC about the real estate market in Portland!
It is doing just fine, regardless of the loss of the .com money, they are getting more people moving in every month!
We have to get this house sold and get there already!!
I am sure it will be on again or look on CNBC.com and try to watch it
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Old May 4th, 2005, 10:31 AM
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Thanks Scarlett, I'll definitely keep an eye out for the special!

In the meantime, I have a favor to ask: Since you're going to get there first, would you be so kind as to put a down payment on a place for me? Doesn't have to be anything extravagant--3000 sq. ft.--near downtown--should do nicely!.

It's a chance for you to demonstrate some of that famous "Southern Hospitality" I've heard so much about.

By the way, house warming party at my house when/if I make it!
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Old May 4th, 2005, 10:34 AM
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I have friends who are deeply invested in the Portland real estate market (they own quite a few buildings with a partner) and they are doing just fine.
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Old May 4th, 2005, 11:35 AM
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Al, honey, I will let the Yankee know our plans when he returns and I am sure we can work something out.
I have been on the Portland MLS site all afternoon Fun!
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Old May 4th, 2005, 07:00 PM
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I've heard there are some serious problems with the urban growth boundaries.

1. It really limits new housing, which sends prices soaring. Getting your first house is supposed to be becoming impossible for many people.

2. New commercial/retail development is largely limited to small shops near the train stations. This doesn't reflect the reality of the way people shop in the US. Some are predicting that in 10 years, you'll have lines of people waiting to get into the few "big box" stores, while all of these small shops sit empty.

3. In the quest to preserve open land outside of the boundary, open land inside is being developed at a quick pace, such as golf courses and parks. So if you want open space, you're going to need to travel to get it.

Also, what's up with gas stations? People in 48 other states are perfectly capable of pumping their own gas.
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Old May 4th, 2005, 07:31 PM
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There's a lot written on the urban growth boundary contesting some of your assertions. As to prices, not having an urban growth boundary hasn't kept prices down in Seattle, believe you, me! Some studies assert the increase in housing costs in Portland is attributable to other causes and you will find similar increases in a lot of other cities across the nation.

As for gas, there was a ballot measure on that one and the voters decided they want service in a gas station. Again, gas is more expensive across the border in Washington (at least in our area of Seattle!)and we have to pump it ourselves. I love it when I go to Oregon and I can sit in my car while someone else pumps my gas!

Open space - go to Forest Park in Portland, which claims to be the largest urban park in the US.

Don't know what small shop development around train stations has to do with the urban growth boundary....Sounds like a good concept, though.
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Old May 4th, 2005, 07:46 PM
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I haven't noticed new shops opening around train stations, as those spots seem to be fully occupied. I have noticed lots of smaller shops, New Seasons type markets, and restaurants opening everywhere else...out on Alberta, on Hawthorne, on Division, on Sandy, etc.

Thats one of the things I love about Portland...lots of small places in the neighborhoods, not just in malls or commercial districts. Friends who have bought real estate chose homes in areas because they had grocery stores and dining spots within walking distance, unlike Honolulu where the commercial districts are large (and separated) and considered an undesireable neighbor.

Prices are no highter than lots of other west coast cities such as San Diego, Seattle, San Francisco that have no boundaries.

I think eventually the density will increase, perhaps driving prices down. Unless of course the the desirability keeps increasing despite more housing units in the city.

Or not. Who knows??
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Old May 4th, 2005, 08:21 PM
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If you can find a copy of today's (4 May) Wall Street Journal there's an interesting article in the "Property" section on Portland - real estate values, unemployment, and the impact Measure 37 will have (negative, duh) on Oregon's growth management legislation. Worth finding if you can.
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Old May 4th, 2005, 09:28 PM
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Couple points:
1. New shops around train stations probably means along MAX line stops, something city government has long used to try and sell mass transit. Nothing to do with Urban Growth Boundary.
2. UGB has served to artificially drive prices. Developers have no place to go. Relates to other comments in this thread about housing prices in excess of economic support. A long-time complaint of locals is that out-of-staters with huge home equities (usually Californicators) move in and drive prices beyond what economy supports.
3. Measure 37: yeah, probably not a good thing for planners. But, how would you feel if you purchased land 10 years ago to build your retirement home, and because of zoning changes couldn't do it. Objective of Measure 37 was to bring equity to those situations.
4. Personal opinion.. Somethings wrong when 80% of mortgages in the Pearl and south waterfront are interest only payments.

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Old Jul 13th, 2012, 01:47 PM
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I am curious to know if you decided to move to Portland or not. It's been a few years since you did this post so was curious. Thanks!
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Old Jul 13th, 2012, 02:20 PM
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color_me_green: "I am curious to know if you decided to move to Portland or not. It's been a few years since you did this post so was curious. Thanks!"

The OP used to be active on Fodors, but has not posted in seven years so probably won't see your question.
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Old Jul 13th, 2012, 02:35 PM
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That's o.k. Anyway, my reasons: It's close to the ocean and to Seattle.
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