Most laid back large city in United States?

Old Oct 21st, 2002, 04:13 PM
  #21  
lucy
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San Diego
 
Old Apr 6th, 2004, 03:44 AM
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I love many things about San Diego, but as a Buffalo (NY) resident, I have to say I've never lived anywhere that's as uncomplicated, day-to-day, as my neighborhood in the Elmwood Village (in the city). Of course, you have to want four seasons...and winter is a bit long, but it can be a very easy-going, tragically hip place.
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Old Apr 6th, 2004, 04:21 AM
  #23  
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I agree with chocolatepsych. As a Rochester resident (pretty similar to Buffalo!) we take a lot of abuse, but you couldn't find a city that is easier to live in than here (OK - except the crummy weather). We have beautiful and CHEAP houses, NO traffic to speak of, great music, amazing parks (Olmstead!), restaurants and cultural activities, and easy access to lakes and other outdoorsy places. Makes it all the more tragic that our economy has been devastated by the general decline of New York state due to both gov't bad management and Sept 11. We may be relocating soon and I'm not happy about it!
 
Old Apr 6th, 2004, 08:06 AM
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I'll vouch for the lack of traffic in Rochester. I spent a couple days there last year for work and was amazed at the lack of commute traffic on the highways.
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 02:13 PM
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I lived in Austin for several years, and I always had the feeling it worked at seeming laid-back.

I also lived in Albuquerque, which seemed very naturally laid-back.
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 02:16 PM
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I don't think San Diego is a city within the meaning of the act. Granted it has enoght people - but it is primarily a car-based suburban culture.

To me - any true city (New York, London, Paris) has to be primarily pedestrian supplemented by public transit and cabs. Urban centers where people drive everywhere really aren't cities - just really overgrown connecting suburbs.

Also - anything substantailly less than a million or so people is too small to be a city.
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 02:48 PM
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"any true city (New York, London, Paris) has to be primarily pedestrian supplemented by public transit and cabs. Urban centers where people drive everywhere really aren't cities - just really overgrown connecting suburbs."

Oh come on, that's ridiculous. Leave it to a New Yorker to take that kind of attitude. Just because a city is car-oriented does not make it a suburb. California cities such as San Diego, San Jose, and Los Angeles may not have the kind of robust public transit systems that the East Coast or Europe has, but that does not make them any less a "city".
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 03:00 PM
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hazel, I have lived in the Bay Area for nearly 40 years (but admittedly grew up in an actual suburb of Manhattan), and I have to say I agree with nyt for the most part. I don't know if I can define why, and it isn't the lack of public transportation, but San Diego and LA have always seemed to me like a bunch of suburbs in search of a downtown. Their respective downtowns just aren't dense enough to qualify.
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 03:06 PM
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uh, didn't anyone notice this 7 year old thread was topped by someone advertising??
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 03:16 PM
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Chicago
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 07:06 PM
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DebitNM,

I didn't notice - and that shows what's maybe my pet peeve about the Fodors site. All that the Recent Activity "headlines" on the left show are when someone most recently posted to a thread. They don't show how old the thread is. As often as not, I don't notice when a thread was started. I actually read through EVERY ONE of the postings to this thread and never once noticed that it was started in 2002 (!) and was reactivated after being dormant since 2004. The posting layout just makes it too easy to miss the date when reading.

Mods/Editors - Is there any way to make the "start date" of a thread more obvious? Maybe by putting the date UNDER the poster's name rather than to the right, so it is harder to miss? I, for one, would appreciate it!
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 08:17 PM
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Most laid back large city in United States

As opposed to most broke back mountain?
_______________

This thread is so laid back it took people nine years to answer.
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 08:28 PM
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"I actually read through EVERY ONE of the postings to this thread and never once noticed that it was started in 2002 (!) and was reactivated after being dormant since 2004. The posting layout just makes it too easy to miss the date when reading."

Ah - but when reading all those posts, did you happen to notice the screen names are gray/unclickable?? That means they are before registration -- and really really OLD . . . .
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Old Jun 30th, 2011, 09:16 PM
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There are many different types of cities. Just because a city doesn't have a cohesive downtown or endless buildings where people do not see the sun doesn't mean it's not a city.

In fact, it could mean a more desirable city in many ways. We have more personal space and can come together when and if we wish.

The people who want to live or stay stacked up on top of each other have an opportunity to do just that. While the rest of us can enjoy our yards. Personally, I wouldn’t want to live in a high rise in California. Yes, we have great building codes these days but high rises make me nervous. I don’t even like crossing overpasses during rush hour.


yeah, yeah sure this was started in 2002. It's the first time I've seen it.
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Old Jul 1st, 2011, 11:00 AM
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janisj - I have noticed that sometimes posters' names are gray and wondered why. You have solved the mystery for me!

Maybe the editors should do something like Tripadvisor does - lock the threads if they do not have any postings for a period of, say, six months or a year. They would still be accessible in the archives, but it would prevent resurrecting dead thread.
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Old Jul 1st, 2011, 04:19 PM
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At Tripadvisor an old thread could mean outdated information. On Fodor's an old topic is just a timeless question.
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