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How is retirement life in DE,VA and WA for single man seeking life partner

How is retirement life in DE,VA and WA for single man seeking life partner

Old Apr 20th, 2016, 08:20 AM
  #1  
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How is retirement life in DE,VA and WA for single man seeking life partner

I am planning to retire soon and changing geographical location for me is key. Currently in NY but the busy NY is out of my retirement plans. I've lived and worked in ON,Canada before I lost my partner and moved up to NY.
Now, Semi- retirement is knocking with VA, DE and Washington on my mind...but I've read and heard about Blue Ridge Mountains to miles of beautiful beaches and coastline of VA being for lovers...I sure need the love... though I am open to finding it anywhere but these 3 states appeal to me more. Its time to work less and share more time with someone special. I'll like to know more about lifestyle and retiring to VA, DE and Washington
karlr101 is offline  
Old Apr 20th, 2016, 09:41 AM
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For the east coast, I would look hard at Wilmington Delaware.
There are several colleges within 40 miles and the winter weather is mild compared with the mountains.
As a dedicated Amtrak rider I like the fact that our soon to be former Vice President got the Wilmington Amtrak station named for himself. Joe is planning on staying in Wilmington for his retirement.
Are you referring to the State of Washington in the Pacific Northwest or Washington District of Columbia?
The Pacific Northwest is a great place to retire to.
My wife and I moved from PA to Oregon 11 years ago.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 10:09 AM
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I could be wrong, but I don't think of Delaware as a hot bed of social activity or prospects for single retirees. Why does it appeal to you? Joe Biden has a mansion and a family and roots there, don't think a similar situation.

Washington DC would be very good as there are lots of activities and lots of single people of all ages. YOu do mean Washington DC, don't you? Of course it is very expensive, though.

Blue Ridge mountains are great but living in rural areas isn't the best way to meet people. You will be very geographically undesirable for many unless they also live very close. If you just want options within a day or so, somewhere in Virginia could be a good compromise, as you do have the mountains and the ocean not too far away from many places.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 10:25 AM
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Friends who retired and moved to Virginia have found it difficult to make new friends, for what that's worth.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 10:34 AM
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I think it all depends on where in Virginia--it's a big state, after all. If Alexandria, for instance, that's effectively a suburb of DC, and so very different from, say, a mountain town.

For social life and activities, I agree with Christina that the DC area would be excellent, but yes, it's an expensive area. Lifestyle could include volunteering or taking classes or joining a fitness group; weekends could be spent at the beach or in the mountains. DC is a young city, which gives it energy, but if being the oldest person in a bar on 14th Street would really bother you... OTOH it's also a city of well (some would say over) educated, politically engaged people, which you might enjoy.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 10:44 AM
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It doesn't take long to get to Chadds Ford PA if you want to see some great art.http://www.brandywine.org/museum/visit/tours
There are a few Sundays that the Brandywine has free admission.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 01:58 PM
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Our friends moved to Williamsburg; she's made a few friends in craft circles, but he, who is an accomplished entymologist and Civil War buff, has had no luck at all trying groups. They've been pretty unwelcoming to someone new in the area.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 02:13 PM
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Friends who retired and moved to Virginia have found it difficult to make new friends, for what that's worth.

Our friends moved to Williamsburg...They've been pretty unwelcoming to someone new in the area.

Oh good grief. And you posted it twice.

Yeah, don't move to Virginia. They hate new people. Especially entomologists married to crafters.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 02:21 PM
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You tagged Washington State (Pacific Northwest) for this post.

But I'm guessing you are asking about Washington DC?
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 02:21 PM
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Sorry not "tagged" but mentioned in your text.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 02:37 PM
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Definitely move to Communist Virginia.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 02:52 PM
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<Its time to work less and share more time with someone special.>

To me it sounds like your priority is finding a partner. That can (or can't) happen anywhere.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 07:28 PM
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My experience with the Tidewater area of Virginia, completely anecdotal of course, was that it was not a very open or welcoming place. And I am neither an entomologist nor a Civil War buff. YMMV.
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Old Apr 20th, 2016, 07:42 PM
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FWIW, Tidewater area is where I met and married my husband. Of course we were 20 somethings at the time.
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Old Apr 21st, 2016, 05:45 AM
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Come to Richmond.....we're friendly
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Old Apr 21st, 2016, 08:10 AM
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> Definitely move to Communist Virginia.

LOL If Virginia is Communist what is California?
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Old Apr 21st, 2016, 08:15 AM
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I would think a road trip would be in your future with stopovers for at least a few days and then a maybe 6 month sojurn to further see the way things are.
"Being unwelcoming" can also be where you are looking. If church is a part of your life, then start there. Museum or library volunteer programs can open doors to acquaintances.
I do think beaches are hard to break into--there's a lot of transience with seasonal visitors, etc.
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