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-   -   First Trip to Wine Country -- Mondavi or Shafer (https://www.fodors.com/community/united-states/first-trip-to-wine-country-mondavi-or-shafer-701765/)

LLindaC May 5th, 2007 11:08 AM

gaelle...you get a lot of good experience by going- but a really good way to start learning is to attend winemaker dinners at restaurants, joining local wine clubs, take a class at continuing education, or attend a wine show (my favorite) Often, wine shops hold tastings. Many times we meet winemakers at shows, then visit them in CA later. One fun show is yearly at EPCOT at Disneyworld in Oct-Nov they have seminars, events, dinners...really fun. Next week, we're going to the Wine Spectator Grand tour..it's a little pricey at $200 a ticket, but you get to sample some really high end wines from around the world...some well over $100 a bottle

LLindaC May 5th, 2007 11:09 AM

forgot to mention that those events are in Vegas, Atlantic City and next week in Chicago.

bill_boy May 5th, 2007 03:18 PM

Llindac,

Why do you resort to the name calling? Fyi, I don't see anything wrong with your wine taste. To each his/her own.

BTW, your husband's obvious taste in both genders are highly evident in your post and I'm glad that you are aware of it.

SAnParis May 6th, 2007 05:50 AM

bill - feel free to depart at your leisure, my Mother always said if you don't have anything nice to say...well you should know the rest. Just an aside, many of the larger wineries have wines available only at the winery or locally. Although I usually gravitate to those wines/wineries that are less known. (personally)

bill_boy May 6th, 2007 09:42 AM

SANParee,

Where did you crawl out from?

Before you comment without any justification, get your facts straight and read the full exhanges in the thread very carefully.

I don't know why your are directing your post at me, but I don't care about your wine taste, either.

SAnParis May 6th, 2007 10:19 AM

At least I have some...billybob

bill_boy May 6th, 2007 11:22 AM

Yes, you do ... questionable it may be.
But, what do I care, STANParis.

SAnParis May 6th, 2007 12:17 PM

billybob - since you appear to think you are all knowing when it comes to wine...what is in your cellar & what do you drink ? I'd love to meet you in person BTW, little twits that act like fools on message boards make for a fine appetizer...

bill_boy May 6th, 2007 03:57 PM

STANParis,

You must be describing yourself.

Anyway, you must be terribly board in that hole of yours as I'm still not sure as to why you decided to slither into this thread.

julzieluv May 6th, 2007 06:59 PM

You're going to forget all advice you get in this forum. Just drive the Napa route and stop wherever you are interested. Some of the smaller wineries are just as fun. You will have a great time. No itinery is the best.

LLindaC May 6th, 2007 07:15 PM

incredibly 'board"....either bill boy is drinking heavily or never passed the 3rd grade, lol! While I agree that it's nice to "pop in" a winery, driving the Napa route and doing that can be tricky, as many now require reservations. Not as common in Napa. Pick a small winery, describe to the owner what you enjoy and take suggestions as you go!

bill_boy May 6th, 2007 09:14 PM


While LlincaC picks on superficial typos, and superficial suggestions, to get her 3-year old mind going, one can certainly "pop INTO" many wineries in Napa. The link below provides maps/lists of wineries with information including the ones that are open to the public, i.e. no appointment necessary, tasting hours and the wineries' websites, location, etc..

http://www.napavintners.com/wineries/

LLindaC May 7th, 2007 05:33 AM

board vs bored not a typo
drop in...correct as well
http://www.english-test.net/esl/lear...sl-answers.php

You continue to badger me, you're fair game, lol.
Because she said "unscheduled" I mentioned that Napa wineries are sometimes harder to visit than Sonoma wineries, especially small ones. They also tend to have higher tasting fees.
I would at least print that info before wasting gas on the back roads.

coffeegirlkristen May 7th, 2007 05:08 PM

My husband did a short stint as a tour guide, we absolutely fell in love with some of the smaller boutique wineries. These are small family owned, nothing like Mondavi. If you get on Silverado Trail (runs parallel to HWY 29) try Reynolds Family Winery, incredible people, amazing wine. And I forget the road, but Ceja was the host winery for the Mustard Festival. AMAZING wine, and again - super cool family. Have fun, definitely stop into the Oakville Grocery in Healsdburg or the original in Oakville and taste there goodies.

adr202 May 8th, 2007 08:59 AM

In Napa, go to Jarvis winery. It's an incredible facility (an underground cave of over 40,000 sq.ft.) and the tour is very personal (only a group of 6-8 is in a tour). Make a reservation!

SAnParis May 10th, 2007 11:02 AM

I agree w/Linda, whole-heartedly...

SallyJ May 11th, 2007 09:38 AM

The banter on this thread is pretty funny. bill boy is kind of vicious in his remarks. Anyhoooooo......

If you haven't been to a winery to see how wine is made, Mondavi (IMO)has the best and most complete tour around. Go early and grab a ticket because the tours sell out fast. Once you have seen that, you can just go to the numerous boutique wineries for tastings.

If you want to combine architecture, history, or modern musuems with your tours (not necessarily the best wines)I recommend:

Beringer Winery -one of the original wineries and was built in 1876. They have a great tour of the caves where they age the wine, and then you end up in the historic house for a wine tasting and gift shop.

Rubicon Estate Winery (formerly Neibaum Coppola) - Francis Ford Coppola has a fabulous winery, gift shop and grounds. It is a beautiful historic building with some of the movie memorabilia from his films on display.

Hess Winery and museum- if you like modern art, Hess has a wonderful collection and great wine tasting. There is also a beautiful short film on the seasons in the valley.

SAnParis May 11th, 2007 11:32 AM

If you do go to Beringer, I would suggest heading straight upstairs for their better wines & skipping the downstairs tasting.

LLindaC May 12th, 2007 05:16 AM

Also be aware that Rubicon charges $25 just to park...very pricey for what you get

razzledazzle May 12th, 2007 03:03 PM

Awwww LLindaC you are being kind about Rubicon-it's simply a gouge to the wallet for mediocre wine. As for the movie memorabilia, if that is what you want to see, visit soon ! FFC's 5 oscars have already been relocated to his Sonoma winery-newly named Rosso & Bianco-and the rest of the movie goodies
are to follow oscar over to Sonoma.

The money would be better spent on a tour & tasting at del dotto or jarvis,
IMHO.

R5


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