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What's the Most Adventurous Thing You've Eaten While Traveling?

What's the Most Adventurous Thing You've Eaten While Traveling?

Aug 18th, 2019, 01:51 PM
  #41  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 9,587
Oh I did have kangaroo jerky in Oz once. gamey but pretty good.
Eugenes team thank you for interesting topics that can generate discussion.
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Aug 18th, 2019, 03:59 PM
  #42  
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
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Montalayo, here in San Miguel. Goat or sheep stomach stuffed with other organs chopped up with various spices. Not a fan.
Cui, or guinea pig in Perú. Not terribly uncommon but it's like eating a family pet.
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Aug 19th, 2019, 02:47 AM
  #43  
 
Join Date: May 2004
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"Goat or sheep stomach stuffed with other organs chopped up" sounds very much like the Scottish staple, haggis or West Country faggots - delicious! Sorry I missed that when in San Miguel.
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Aug 19th, 2019, 05:31 AM
  #44  
mms
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
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Some things that are adventurous for one person is normal for another, as shown on here.

Haggis in Scotland was new to me. It was fine, but I just couldn't think about it.

Escargot in France we loved, as did our kids who ordered it every chance possible.

Alligator in Georgia and Louisiana. Not a fan of it.

Many varieties of game I really enjoy. I come from a family of hunters, so this was totally normal, everyday food for us. I remember dad hunting rabbits on the land next to our house and making rabbit stew on Sundays. He also made venison sausage, and I can still remember helping him grind the meat, etc. The deer that would hang in our garage until ready to process. Caribou is my favorite game. Moose is really good too, and we are actually headed to Alaska in a few weeks to join family on the annual moose hunt.
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Aug 19th, 2019, 08:09 AM
  #45  
 
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"Caribou is my favorite game. Moose is really good too"
Do they really taste any different from say venison (as in deer)? I ask only because I remember visiting the Carnivour Restaurant in Nairobi years ago and they were serving up game meats like Eland, Wildebeeste, Buffalo and even Giraffe - they all seemed to taste like venison though!
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Aug 19th, 2019, 11:23 AM
  #46  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Cuy and croc--not a big fan. But loved Sicilian sea urchin and Zimbabwean warthog---to die for.
I am done. The plate.
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Aug 19th, 2019, 01:47 PM
  #47  
mms
 
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crellston--Yes, they taste totally different. Venison is just ok for me, and moose is very good, but caribou is hands down my favorite!
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Aug 22nd, 2019, 09:08 AM
  #48  
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
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Deep fried grasshoppers..
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Aug 22nd, 2019, 11:59 AM
  #49  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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In his autobio, TV traveler Josh Gates talks of eating red army ants during one of his jungle tribal expeditions. They apparently burnt the inside of his mouth.
I am done. The impossible-to-refuse-offering.
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Aug 22nd, 2019, 01:47 PM
  #50  
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
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Though not too adventurous....many/most African antelope, crocodile, U.S. alligator, rock mountain oysters, most parts of a pig and who could forget haggis in Scotland and blood sausage in the UK.
One the most interesting was sauteed Mopani worms in Namibia. They were quite good.
We are looking forward to our trip to Southeast Asia next year and trying some of the insects.
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Aug 22nd, 2019, 03:59 PM
  #51  
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
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I had an opportunity to have great green gobs of gooey grimy gopher guts. Unfortunately, I forgot my spoon.
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Aug 26th, 2019, 02:04 PM
  #52  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Bourdain apparently got sick sick sick after eating the ____ of a warthog, if memory serves. Namibian bushmen had served it up as a delicacy out in the desert and he could not refuse. He ended up having literally months of medical attention after returning to NYC.
Those rascal bushmen and their Trojan Horse offerings.
I am done. The sound of
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Aug 26th, 2019, 10:15 PM
  #53  
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
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There are many adventures think while traveling like,Moonshine, Appalachia

Fugu, Japan
Ithaa Undersea Restaurant, Maldives
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Aug 28th, 2019, 09:56 PM
  #54  
kja
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
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Proving (perhaps) that "adventurous" is relative to one's experience and preferences -- donkey.
And FWIW, it was delicious!
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Aug 29th, 2019, 10:16 PM
  #55  
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
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Travenix

EATEN WHILE TRAVELING
It's one of the greatest pleasures of life. And it's more than that for tourists. When you're traveling, food isn't just a matter of sustenance or pleasure. It's about culture, authenticity and experience. This is interaction with locals. Life is at its simplest and most interesting.

When I first started traveling, I didn't understand much about the food: where to eat, what to eat, or even what to ask to discover. As time passes, you learn these stuff. Still, I wish someone had told me about the food ins and outs before I took my first culinary snorkel.

Local foods are better (and safer):

It doesn't matter how strange or inedible the local food looks — there's a reasonable possibility that it's safer to consume than any local attempt at Western fare.
I once traveled through Laos with an English guy who wasn't very adventurous, insisting on eating ham sandwiches every day instead of noodle soups and stir-fries the rest of us were eating. We went fairly much unscathed through the whole journey. My friend was sick all the time.
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Sep 2nd, 2019, 02:37 PM
  #56  
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
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When in Athens, years ago, we ordered the chef's choice and had no idea what we would get. The first course was soup and described by the waiter as "ink of the squid." It was black as coal, had bits of some kind of fish in it, and was delicious! I would probably never had ordered it if I had read it on the menu, but since then have not been the least bothered by pasta cooked in squid ink. I've never since seen the soup on a menu though, but would order it.
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Sep 5th, 2019, 05:42 AM
  #57  
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
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The spiders in Cambodia, I guess. Not good. Rattlesnake, squirrel and gator when I lived in the US were kind of different but ok. I cook kangaroo all the time. Doesn't seem that adventurous, it's sold in the meat section of most Aussie grocers. It's a nice lean meat with good flavour, like venison

There is durian for sale at most stores here too but the smell is enough to put me off. Had crickets at a food show not too long ago. Kind of dry but otherwise not bad or good. Not something I'd buy by the bag.

I can't even look at balut and think of eating. Could not be bothered with trying the guinea pig in Peru. I'd really like to try the fermented soup and will look into that next time we get back to VN.
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Sep 5th, 2019, 09:35 AM
  #58  
 
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My buddy and I drove all over Portugal in '88. In one tiny town, we ate the stew boiling in the sole restaurant's cauldron. What made that remarkable was that the visible boiling body parts seemed to come from a hybrid creature. For decades we referred to that meal as 'the mystery meat'. Then someone over on Thorntree clarified what the stew likely was.
I am done. The I don't wanna know.....
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Sep 5th, 2019, 10:44 AM
  #59  
 
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Originally Posted by zebec View Post
My buddy and I drove all over Portugal in '88. In one tiny town, we ate the stew boiling in the sole restaurant's cauldron. What made that remarkable was that the visible boiling body parts seemed to come from a hybrid creature. For decades we referred to that meal as 'the mystery meat'. Then someone over on Thorntree clarified what the stew likely was.
I am done. The I don't wanna know.....
I do! Please
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Sep 7th, 2019, 08:39 AM
  #60  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 910
Yo JW,
That dish was the traditional goat stew known as 'chanfana'. Seems a key ingredient is wine, whether vino verde or not, I don't know. It was tasty, but now alas, the element of mystery has been lost.

Bonus--adventurous things eaten?
In India, it is not unusual to encounter foods so spicy that one's eyes water uncontrollably and a certain metallic taste engulfs the tastebuds. At least once, my driver and his rascal pals deliberately inflicted such dishes on my unsuspecting virgin palate, in order to test my reaction. They later made up for it by inviting me to their modest private party, where beer cooled down any burning sensations.
I am done. The tearing eyes.
Next?
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