Have you ever eaten at a domestic chain while abroad?

Aug 17th, 2019, 04:42 AM
  #41  
 
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Meant to say large Phillipino “population” in the area.
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Aug 18th, 2019, 12:53 AM
  #42  
 
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I didn't think Filipino was spelled differently in US English but I see that it is.
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Aug 18th, 2019, 02:05 AM
  #43  
 
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Originally Posted by Odin View Post
I didn't think Filipino was spelled differently in US English but I see that it is.
You assume my spelling represents the US. It represents me only. Sorry if it was misspelt.
Regards.

Last edited by jacketwatch; Aug 18th, 2019 at 02:14 AM.
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Aug 18th, 2019, 08:46 AM
  #44  
 
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Are Nicholson pubs considered a chain now?
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Aug 18th, 2019, 01:36 PM
  #45  
 
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Ok mentioned above is Pret A Manger which google tells me there are some in NYC. I don't go there often so not sure I've ever seen one as I've never eaten at one.

I haven't heard of Jollibee before.

Are there anymore that are international with a presence in the US?
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Aug 18th, 2019, 01:46 PM
  #46  
 
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Originally Posted by sassy27 View Post
Ok mentioned above is Pret A Manger which google tells me there are some in NYC. I don't go there often so not sure I've ever seen one as I've never eaten at one.

I haven't heard of Jollibee before.

Are there anymore that are international with a presence in the US?
https://www.jollibee.com.ph/chicken-joy/
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Aug 19th, 2019, 09:46 AM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by jacketwatch View Post
I know of only one. Its a Phillipino chicken franchise called Jollibee.
They're in Los Angeles as well (what isn't?), and I assume they're doing well -- they just purchased the Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf company.
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Aug 19th, 2019, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by ibobi View Post
They're in Los Angeles as well (what isn't?), and I assume they're doing well -- they just purchased the Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf company.
I did not know about that acquisition. Thank you.
There must be a large population from the Phillipines there to support them,
When they first opened here the lines were two hours long initially. Its a taste of home for so many
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Aug 22nd, 2019, 01:04 AM
  #49  
 
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Starbucks. I have a friend who collects the mugs. Also, itís nice to know what Iím getting when Iím half asleep.oddly, in Japan, itís actually better. I liked the specialty Japanese cold drink far more than the US ones. There are probably other coffee chains Iím not thinking of. 7-11, if that countsóI donít think it does I wouldnít touch the food at home.

Hard Rock Cafe, in Tokyo. I was curious if it was significantly different than the US, and I wanted to sit down in the A/C for awhile. Not worth the price but I donít remember loving Hard Rock at home either.
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Aug 24th, 2019, 11:08 PM
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Eaten at - no. Bought a bottle of water, because I wanted to use the toilet- yes, a couple of McDonalds.

For the same reason, and out of curiosity about Americansí apparent love of ď StarbucksĒ, I ordered a coffee in one of their NYC outlets. Two sips were enough. I tipped the remainder down the toilet & tossed the container in the rubbish bin.

Iím not a fan of chain foods in my own country & not sure which, if any of the Australian chains have a presence overseas.

If Iíve eaten at a ďdomesticĒ ( indigenous to the country I was visiting) chain, I donít recall it.
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Aug 31st, 2019, 05:00 PM
  #51  
 
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In London in 1989, with our teenage sons, went to McDonald's. Extremely hot weather and we were craving drinks with ice, but as I remember, the drinks didn't have much. Came back to the small hotel and discovered a big ice bucket in the lobby for the Americans...
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Sep 1st, 2019, 05:05 AM
  #52  
 
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I don’t travel much to the US these days but if I happened across a Tim Horton’s I might stop in for a cup of tea or quick lunch. It ’s the Canadian thing to do.
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Sep 5th, 2019, 05:48 AM
  #53  
 
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Ate at the Popeyes in the Hanoi airport. I was just shocked to see it there and I hadn't had it since moving to Australia 10 years ago. (it's pretty good chicken!)

We did eat at the McDs in Moscow once but we were there for like a month and had pretty much lived on Uzbek food otherwise. Russian food is ok but...
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Sep 5th, 2019, 06:09 AM
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Starbucks, even though I rarely go to Starbucks at home.
Cool A/C and nice, big, clean bathrooms.
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Sep 6th, 2019, 03:47 PM
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I also have no idea what 'domestic chains' is supposed to mean. The biggest chains (McDs, Starbucks, Dominos, Subway, etc, etc) are multinational companies regardless of where they happen to be domiciled. Maybe what the OP means is 'do you eat in chains abroad that you have at home?'
Probably much more simple if you are only asking Americans this question. But if you realise that american chains (i.e. ultimately domiciled in the USA) have been 'domesticated' in many countries for decades, the question, as raised, starts to make very little sense.
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Sep 6th, 2019, 10:40 PM
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Out go to in the US is Starbucks as we know we will get a hot cup of tea!! We will normally get a muffin as well. We never go to a Starbucks in NZ.
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Sep 7th, 2019, 12:24 AM
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I made a huge mistake the other night while in Dublin Ireland. After a tour so getting back at 7:30 pm, we walked by a TGIF. We thought we would just get appetizers after being in a bus all day. The food was not good, the server only took our order and payment. We were not asked about refills on drinks or even plates to put the apps on. I immediately thought of this thread so had to post it.
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Sep 7th, 2019, 12:27 AM
  #58  
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Is there a point at which further input will no longer benefit Eugene's Team?
Will we be notified at that time, or will the thread be closed, or will it be left open?
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Sep 7th, 2019, 04:13 AM
  #59  
 
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Originally Posted by janisj View Post
I took the question to be "Do you ever eat at chains from your own home country when traveling overseas?"

(But the question is not really fleshed out -- so its open to ALL SORTS of interpretations)
Originally Posted by suze View Post
That is the wording I was hoping for, janisj. For clarity in replies.
And especially if they are fishing around for material to use in articles or guidebooks. Questions should be more precise.
'From' is not really a clear and meaningful way to frame this topic either. We have Subway shops all over England but ultimately the franchiser for the independently (usually locally) owned shops is an American company (so I guess Subway would be 'from' America?). A couple of times I had a Subway sandwich in Paris (sacrilege, I know) when I was working long term there. If I need an excuse for this -- it was late and I just wanted a quick and no hassle source of calories to stay alive.

For the purpose of this topic, is there any difference in me (from England) eating Subway in Paris vs someone from the US eating Subway in Paris? That's why I think the question that will clearly illicit the responses desired is simply if you've eaten in chains abroad that you have at home. But, in fact, Subway is all over Paris too so it's really no more 'foreign' there than it is in England. For the purposes of this topic, I think chains cease being American (or whatever) when they truly globalise and just become part of the fabric of many countries. At one point Starbucks in Britain was considered to be American but no longer, at least among younger people in the target demographic. Referring to Starbucks as "that American coffee shop" will quickly make you look like a dinosaur. Is Microsoft Windows 'American software'? Well it is and it isn't. For most purposes, it isn't.

Often (here on Fodors and elsewhere) you will be slammed if you make reference to, for example, eating in a US based chain restaurant in Europe. The assumption is that anyone who would dare want to eat at a US chain in Paris, for example, doesn't know how to travel, is ignorant, and provincial. If you dare mention this, you'd better pepper your post with explanations and excuses or put your helmet on. A contrarian view to this would be that thinking that when in Paris you should be eating only 'typical French food' is rather parochial and quaint. Sure, if you spend a week or two in Paris every couple of years, most would want to get their fill of 'typical French food'. But for those who travel extensively all over the world, the most cosmopolitan people, there is much less fervent need to have 'typical French food' for every meal if you're visiting Paris several times per year. French food will always be there in Paris so when you spend, for example, 100+ days in France per year, you will eat a variety of things. Just like it's quaint to think that visitors to NYC should be eating bagels and the best NY pizza (or whatever) every day. Is it shocking if a French person wants to eat at a French restaurant in NYC?

Perhaps related to this topic, I once was visiting a friend in South Africa and he started describing this 'amazing' chain in South Africa that he wants to take me to. He starts describing how it serves this thing called "peri-peri chicken" (some will know where I'm going here). "It's called Nandos". "Ummm....dear friend....I appreciate your desire to show me something 'local' but we have Nandos all over England"

Maybe it would be cool to visit a Nandos in South Africa, even if they are all over England and, in England, very well 'domesticated' there to the point that it's not really thought of as 'South African'. Leading to an interesting related question: Do you feel more inclined to visit chains that originate in the country you're visiting, even if you are not big fans of them at home?

For example, the much hyped dumpling chain Din Tai Fung is found in many major cities around the world, including in my hometown of London. When in Taiwan, I visited the original restaurant where it all started.

Just my perspective, for what it's worth.
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Sep 7th, 2019, 02:29 PM
  #60  
 
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My last McDonald’s hamburger was in Delft in 1973. I do still eat at McDonald’s for the chicken nuggets.

I ate at a KFC in England during the Charles/Diana wedding in 1981. I as the only customer!

One of the best burgers I ever had was at the Burger King at the Munich Hbf in 1973. Ate at a a BK in Tuebingen bf in 2016
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