1st trip to europe from the US, item list needed

Nov 19th, 2018, 08:17 AM
  #1  
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1st trip to europe from the US, item list needed

Hello, heading to Belgium and Amsterdam in May 2019.
what will be our essentials, power adapters, raincoats, walking shoes ect......2days antwerp, 2days Bruges, 4days Amsterdam. We will be doing sight seeing, a rock concert and more sightseeing
:0)
and lotz of eateries
kgveteran is offline  
Nov 19th, 2018, 10:21 AM
  #2  
 
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Power: Forget taking anything that has a heating or motor function unless it is already dual voltage. A voltage transformer is heavy and things won't work anyway. For items that are dual voltage already (read the fine print on the device) you will want a plug adapter. Virtually all power blocks for charging and/or running computers, phones, and tablets are already dual voltage. If you need a hair dryer, the hotel almost surely has one for you.

Raincoat: Of course. Wear it on the plane. And the pockets hold things that don't make it into the carry-on. (You weren't planning to check a bag for just 8 days, were you?) A small collapsible umbrella can come in handy.

Walking shoes: Yes! And they must be fully broken in before you go. I learned the French words for "friction" and "blister" when I tried using new shoes on a trip.

Etc: Don't bring anything for "Just in case." Get free shampoo and soap from your hotel. Buy any other little things if you need them locally.

Medication: Carry prescription drugs on you (enough for the trip plus a dropped pill or two). Then pack an equal amount in your carry-on. Duplicate written prescriptions or a list of medications (by brand and generic name) will help if worst comes to worst.

A day bag for carrying the umbrella, phone, guide book, impulse purchases, etc. A few plastic bags from the grocery store for a multitude of purposes,

A color copy of your passport and a spare picture if you are forced to get a new one on your trip.

Your driver's license which works well if you need to prove your identity or signature without your passport.

No extra clothes. No one will care if you are wearing something that isn't pristinely clean. No one cares if you wore the same outfit yesterday.
AJPeabody is online now  
Nov 19th, 2018, 05:57 PM
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That will work.

If you keep your passport with you you need a money belt, which you need anyway if your hotel doesn't have a safe. I use this:

https://lewisnclark.com/waist-stash/

I wear it with the pouch at the back, but I'm female and it may work better the other way for males. It is NOT for items you will need to access in public during the day - i.e. the day's supply of cash goes elsewhere.

My packing lists are far more extensive than you need for this trip, but will give you an idea of what to think about. There are three packing posts, and one "leaving home" list, links at the top:

https://mytimetotravel.wordpress.com...take-part-one/
thursdaysd is offline  
Nov 19th, 2018, 07:23 PM
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Look at the iphone charger block. It will probably say something like 50-60 cycles 110-240 v. It may be in minuscule raised or sunken letters . It means all you need is a plug adapter.

https://www.padandquill.com/blog/201...h-your-iphone/
AJPeabody is online now  
Nov 20th, 2018, 12:41 AM
  #6  
 
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I've never owned a money belt and do not intend to and have lived and travelled all over Europe all my life without incident, so far. You might feel safer having one. I don't carry much cash at all, I use ATMs locally when I need it. I also like to have a clean set of clothes everyday and almost never pack light, I always check luggage in unless an overnight trip, I don't have time or inclination to seek out laundries (unless in Bangkok or such places where it's easy and cheap) nor wish to wash clothes in a hotel sink which I find gross. After a day of walking around sightseeing, I prefer a shower and a clean set of clothes daily. Shampoos and soaps provided by hotels are not usually very nice, esp the shampoo so take my own toiletries. I decant into smaller bottles for travelling. Travel insurance esp covering medical is important, I keep a photo of my passport on my iphone in case I lose my passport which I mostly leave in the hotel safe unless in a country that requires you to have your passport on you at all times.
Odin is offline  
Nov 20th, 2018, 02:54 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by AJPeabody View Post
Look at the iphone charger block. It will probably say something like 50-60 cycles 110-240 v. It may be in minuscule raised or sunken letters . It means all you need is a plug adapter.

https://www.padandquill.com/blog/201...h-your-iphone/
i get it now, i will need adaptors for my iphone charging bloc, we will have no other devices. Thanx for explaining :0)
kgveteran is offline  
Nov 20th, 2018, 05:05 AM
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There are also some mobile apps which offers a checklist for travels. Just search "travel checklists" and it provides you a full list. You can just add or remove manually.
helixspin is offline  
Nov 20th, 2018, 05:23 AM
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Odin >You might feel safer having one. I don't carry much cash at all, I use ATMs locally when I need it.>

I rarely use cash when traveling to Europe as most countries are going more cashless. I have traveled in Norway and England and never used an ATM machine or the countries currency. I only used my Visa card plus you get a better exchange rate. I used my credit care for cab fare, public transit, restaurants, shops, hotels, etc.
nanabee is offline  
Nov 20th, 2018, 06:41 AM
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Originally Posted by helixspin View Post
There are also some mobile apps which offers a checklist for travels. Just search "travel checklists" and it provides you a full list. You can just add or remove manually.
thank you !
kgveteran is offline  
Nov 20th, 2018, 08:35 AM
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I've never owned a money belt and do not intend to and have lived and travelled all over Europe all my life without incident, so far
Lucky you. One data point does not alter the fact that pick pocketing is common in a number of cities in Europe. I have traveled to over 70 countries, but I was still pick pocketed in Rome. However, all he got was a day's cash. And living somewhere is very different from traveling there.
thursdaysd is offline  
Nov 20th, 2018, 09:10 AM
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>>I have traveled in Norway and England and never used an ATM machine or the countries currency<<

Really?? There are many times especially for small purchases, tipping a guide, pay toilets, etc etc etc, when cash would not only be preferable, it would be the only option. I travel to Europe frequently - both of those countries and others and never (ever) had a trip where I didn't use some currency/cash.

>> . . .plus you get a better exchange rate <<

You really don't get a better exchange rate -- typically you get the same rate with a cc and using an ATM. Plus many merchants will give a discount for cash because they have to pay visa/mc/Amex a % of each transaction. But if your bank soaks you with fees for using foreign ATMs, that is a consideration. Mine don't.
janisj is online now  
Nov 20th, 2018, 09:38 AM
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I would not take an actual raincoat for travel in May. "Layering" is the way to go. I like a cotton shirt, w/ option for a sweater or fleece over it. If you feel the need then a rain-shell type jacket or small travel umbrella in addition. TWO pair of comfortable walking shoes (just in case).
suze is online now  
Nov 20th, 2018, 09:44 AM
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https://www.ricksteves.com/travel-ti...s-packing-list

Rick Steves has good basic packing lists. I think they are a perfect place to start.
suze is online now  
Nov 20th, 2018, 06:25 PM
  #15  
kja
 
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Originally Posted by Odin View Post
I've never owned a money belt and do not intend to and have lived and travelled all over Europe all my life without incident, so far..
I haven’t had the time or money to travel all over Europe, and I never will. For me, my most valuable asset when traveling is my time – and the very last thing I want to do with my time when traveling is to deal with an unnecessary problem due to theft or loss. For me, using a money belt is a simple and convenient way to give myself peace of mind. YMMV.
kja is offline  
Nov 22nd, 2018, 09:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Odin View Post
. I also like to have a clean set of clothes everyday and almost never pack light, I always check luggage in unless an overnight trip.
The average EU washing machine is 6kg.
Most low cost carriers have a 10kg carry on limit.

That means you can almost fit two full machines of clothing into a carry on. Plus I assume you wear something onto the plane.
Traveler_Nick is online now  
Nov 23rd, 2018, 05:25 AM
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I also like to have a clean set of clothes everyday and almost never pack light, I always check luggage in unless an overnight trip
You must take short trips. My last trip was six weeks and most of mine have been longer. I don't even own enough clothes for that to work for a trip of any length even if I wanted to haul them around, and I don't travel with more than I can carry. I do check my bigger bag, but I don't have to.
thursdaysd is offline  
Nov 26th, 2018, 10:21 AM
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Even for shorter trips (!!) there's no way I have or could pack enough clothing to have a brand new fresh outfit (or two) every day. Plus that's really low on my priority list. And yes I do use local laundry services where they are affordable, and also wash stuff in the shower or sink as well.
suze is online now  
Dec 10th, 2018, 04:47 AM
  #19  
 
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The trend in Sweden, Norway and England is going cashless.
For me it was possible (really) to travel completely cashless. It is far more convenient for me than going to an ATM machine or carrying around cash for whatever discount. According to Bloomberg, “no cash accepted” signs are becoming a common sight around the country.

Here are a few articles
https://www.businessinsider.com/norw...society-2018-4

https://www.verdict.co.uk/europe-cashless-society/There is an increasing trend in Sweden of shops, restaurants and museums refusing to accept cash payments. Sweden’s transport system also, for the most part, only accepts card or mobile payment in a bid to improve the safety of transport staff.
https://www.theguardian.com/money/20...tless-payments

Last edited by nanabee; Dec 10th, 2018 at 04:50 AM.
nanabee is offline  
Dec 10th, 2018, 05:07 AM
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Cashlessness, besides discriminating against the marginalized poor, will eventually lead to situations where things cannot be bought by anyone. Power failures? Hacking of a major electronic exchange system? Solar flare? Cyberwar? Or something as simple as loss or damage to my financial token (phone, chipped card).

Cashless purchasing also means one cannot be "off the grid" or avoid legal or extralegal tracking.

Paranoia or legitimate concerns?
AJPeabody is online now  

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