Costa Rica Pacific Highlands and Coast-Feb 2015

Old Mar 2nd, 2015, 11:47 AM
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I look forward to your report on Carara. I'm thinking about going there from our cruise which docks in Punta Arenas for a day, 7 am to 7pm. Or to take an excursion to Monteverde.
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Old Mar 2nd, 2015, 02:21 PM
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More photos:

Uvita and South Pacific:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/312673...57648775391644

Rio Tarcoles:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/312673...57651051959776

(Check out the croc with his lower teeth sticking out through his nostrils!)
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Old Mar 3rd, 2015, 06:59 AM
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February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Feb 20, 2015, 10:12 AM

We spent 10 nights in Costa Rica in February (our 6th time) exploring parts of the country we hadn’t seen before. It was a combination rest/relaxation plus birdwatching trip.

I'll provide a brief summary and then follow with more detailed posts on how the trip went. Will be working on photos for a while--took about 2000 of them. Will post a link when they are up.

Bullet point summary:

Itinerary: Fly into San Jose, followed by a ‘loop’ that begins with a drive to Bosque del Tolomuco (2 nights) (15KM north of San Isidro), stopping for lunch and a tour in Cerro de Muerte, followed by three nights at Rio Magnolia (about halfway between San Isidro and Dominical), then drive to Tikivillas in Uvita (three nights) stopping at Los Cusingos reserve first, then back up the coast to Cerro Lodge near Tarcoles for two nights) then back to the airport.

Purpose: Rest, relaxation, and birds. Lots of birds.

Air travel--Copa: RECOMMENDED but be advised that coach class on the red eye isn’t great for sleeping.

Costa Rica Discount Card—RECOMMENDED. It got us discounts with both Vamos and Bahia Aventuras—two quality outfits. More than paid for itself. Just be sure to have a printout or electronic file of the actual card image with a card number they send you.

Car rental—Vamos. RECOMMENDED Great service, looked for ways to save us money even.

Lodging:

Bosque del Tolomuco—RECOMMENDED for people who love nature and willing to rent their own vehicle and are looking for a spring-like, not summer, climate. Good location to explore the entire valley and highlands area. Especially recommended for birders.

Rio Magnolia—RECOMMENDED for people (especially couples—no small children allowed)wanting to get away from it all for a few days and enjoying some nice creature comforts while in splendid isolation with great views and experience nature. The owners are great hosts. Great place for birds.

Tikivillas: RECOMMENDED for just about everyone who can deal with heat (especially couples—no kids allowed). Amazing views, chic, romantic ambiance, just lovely. And it’s got enough nature for those who appreciate such things.

Cerro Lodge—RECOMMENDED for nature lovers, especially birders, who aren’t in need of a full service lodging option and can organize things themselves.

Tours:

Paraiso Quetzales lunch plus quetzal tour—RECOMMENDED. We had a hearty lunch, saw great hummingbirds and other birds on property, and then had a tour where quetzals flew over our heads.

Andres Chinchilla (bird guide): RECOMMENDED for birding in the San Isidro/Valle General area—he was our guide at Bosque del Tolomuco, Rio Magnolia, and Los Cusingos. Good guide, great at spotting and recognizing vocalizations.

Los Cusingos: RECOMMENDED for anyone who’s into birds, this not only has great birds, but also the home—perfectly preserved—of the most prominent and important ornithologist in Central America, Dr. Alexander Skutch.

Bahia Aventuras: RECOMMENDED for boat tours leaving out of Uvita to do whale/dolphin watching or Mangroves. Great service.

Rancho Merced Night tour: AVOID AT ALL COSTS. Terrible, worthless experience. They apparently do pretty nice horse riding tours and take good care of the animals, but their night tour is a night mare (see what I did there).

Fantastic Birding (affiliated with Cerro Lodge) boat tour: RECOMMENDED. It doesn’t seem like much when you start—only a captain, no other guide, but man can he spot birds. He picked out three pygmy kingfishers hiding in mangrove tangles.

Carara Birding tours (booked via Cerro Lodge): YOU CAN DO BETTER BY BOOKING YOUR OWN. The owner Federico is not the most organized guy, and despite us asking for a bird guide for Carara several times MONTHS before our trip and then immediately before our arrival, the day we arrived he had not booked a guide for us. He managed to scramble and find us a naturalist (but not a bird specialist) guide (Vic Tours) who took us on a tour of Carara with some first time visitors to Central America. He was very good for that kind of tour, and we enjoyed it, but still we were hoping for a more specialized tour, that we had asked for, that was the entire purpose of staying there.
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Racandee
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31. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Feb 26, 2015, 11:33 AM

I should have taken a photo when there were 10 green honeycreepers on the feeder at the same time..
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32. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Feb 26, 2015, 11:34 AM

Cool
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33. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 02, 2015, 11:44 AM

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34. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 02, 2015, 11:48 AM

Day 8: We have an early breakfast (specially arranged by Pablo) and head off to our tour of the Sierpe-Terraba mangroves with Bahia Aventuras. Our boat speeds us up to the Coronado river mouth, which is a bit bumpy with the tides, but eventually we settle in and enjoy a lovely boat tour of the mangroves. We see a lot of birds, though nothing we haven’t seen before (we’re a bit hard to please after having seen so many mangroves in past travels), and a small crocodile. But, no monkeys or snakes or anything like that. Still Bahia Aventuras does a very good job and it’s an enjoyable half-day trip. We then head back, grabbing pizza at a small place off the Costanera. (We tried to eat at Pizzeria La Fogata in Uvita, but while they have signs in town and on the highway pointing in their general direction, the restaurant itself is apparently unmarked/unsigned, and we weren’t about to do an Indiana Jones routine for pizza). We spend the rest of the day in the pool at Tikivillas, where sights include a toucan in a tree just off the pool (like 4 feet away) calling very loudly and a king vulture (!) circling high but nearby (my wife told me I was probably just seeing what I wanted to see until I swam over to her with binoculars). Another delicious dinner and we called it a day.

Day 9: For the first time, a bit of sadness knowing that our vacation was almost over. Also, Tikivillas is such a perfect place to be, sigh. I get up early and walk up the road from the hill looking for birds, with some success, and then head back down so we can pack and change. We enjoy our last lovely breakfast, settle our account there, and start driving up the coast towards Tarcoles and our last destination, Cerro Lodge. The drive between Uvita and just south of Quepos goes very quickly, as there is not much development on this stretch of the road. After that, however, it goes a bit slower but we still make it to Cerro Lodge in just about 2 hours flat. (The turnoff for Cerro Lodge is about 5km north of the Crocodile bridge on the western side of the road. Our Garmin GPS tried to make us turn off 150 meters past the bridge onto a private, locked driveway).

We arrive and park, and check in. Cerro Lodge is a very lovely place with cute little cabins. However, service there is . . . an opportunity for improvement. Essentially they have the same 2-3 people washing dishes, cooking food, and running the front desk (with no one who spoke a word of English—we managed but beware). The person who checked us in had to direct our attention to a magic marker board with cabin numbers and names so we could point out my name and a cabin number. We had booked our mangrove birding tour with the lodge, but no one there knew how to get there or anything about this tour. Fortunately, we were able to find flyers/brochures for the tour on the unoccupied tour desk. Since one has to make advance reservations for lunch (something we learned on the spot) we headed to El Guacimo soda across the highway from Cerro Lodge’s entrance. Food there was quick and good, and from there we headed to our 3:00 PM boat tour. We found the place without much problem, thanks to my wife’s navigation skills. The company, Fantastic Birding, provided a very good tour. I have to admit I was a little skeptical at first when we saw that there was only a captain, not a separate guide. But, we started seeing birds right away before even getting on the boat, and our captain was a very good at spotting wildlife, and we saw a ton of birds and at least 20 crocodiles along the river banks. We then headed into the mangroves where the boat captain again wowed us with his ability to spot very small birds inside tangled mangroves. Late afternoon is a great time for photographers as well, as the light in the Tarcoles mouth area is for some reason especially sublime in the late afternoon, both on the water and up in the hills.

We then head to dinner at the time of our dinner ‘reservation’ which is odd because it’s a buffet. The food is all right, nothing special. We then made an attempt to confirm our guided bird tour of Carara national park for the next day. Which we had asked Federico the owner to book for us months in advance. Well, as it turns out, they hadn’t booked our tour. We attempt to ask the waiter/cook/dishwasher about this, and he has a woman who we presume to be the manager, who asks us whether we want a generalist or “un especialista en aves.” We reply that it’s the latter, and eventually we they bring us a phone with Federico who tells us we are on a tour in Carara beginning 8:00 the next morning (park opens at 7:00 which is when the best birding is). He also suggests that I explore the road outside Cerro Lodge’s grounds before leaving for our tour. I thank him and we set our reservations for the breakfast buffet the next morning. We try a bit to look for an owl that is known to hang around the lodge grounds at night, but it’s way too windy, so we turn in.
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pam_redboots
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35. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 02, 2015, 1:00 PM

thank you for the latest installment! i love your photos too.
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36. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 02, 2015, 1:40 PM

It is always nice to hear about other people have also enjoyed the great pool at TikiVillas!

As for Cerro Lodge, it must be that all those birders, which are mainly the guests of this lodge, are so keen on spotting birds that the staff just don't bother anymore, thinking spotting their cabin or table would be a pice of cake, hahaha! Anyway, grounds are lovely, and the road outside can provide for nice surprises.

No owls?! He, we have seen them, two!

Would you be so kind and post the link to Fantastic Birding tour company?! I have had it but lost it already.
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37. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 02, 2015, 1:46 PM

Here's their link:

http://www.fantasticbirding.com/

We booked and paid through the hotel (paying the tip to el capitan of course).

Didn't get the black-and-white owl at Cerro Lodge (too windy for them to get bugs). But we got the crested owl in Honduras in December, so our owl karma is still pretty good.
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38. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 02, 2015, 3:53 PM

Wonderful report and pictures, thank you for sharing!
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39. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 02, 2015, 5:17 PM

More photos:

Uvita and South Pacific:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/312673...57648775391644

Rio Tarcoles:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/312673...57651051959776

(Check out the croc with his lower teeth sticking out through his nostrils!)
Edited: 5:17 pm, yesterday
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40. Re: February trip report (Pacific highlands and coast)
Mar 03, 2015, 9:58 AM

Day 10:

Our last full day in Costa Rica. I get up around 6:00 and start exploring the road as Federico suggested. I walk down the road for about 30-35 minutes, seeing nothing of interest, and start grumbling to myself about how this really wasn’t a good birding place at all. I turn around and head back towards the lodge when I see a bird with a chestnut body and pure white head land in a nearby tree. This is one of the most prized birds in Central America—the three-wattled bellbird. He quietly checks out the area, and I snap a bunch of photos, then he flies off, and then a very cool hawk (crane hawk) lands three trees over, not more than two minutes later and I snap a bunch of photos of that bird. So, the day is already a success as of 7:12 am, and the scheduling snafu has turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Pura vida, sometimes ya gotta just roll with it.

We have a decent breakfast and then head out to Carara to meet our guide, Victor of Vic Tours. We share him with an older Israeli couple who’ve never been to Costa Rica before as well as a Canadian woman. Victor gives a very good tour and knows his stuff (but does explain that “I am not a bird specialist” which at this point just makes me laugh a little inside). We see some very cool things, birds, bats, etc. We hike the main “Quebrada Bonita” loop as well as the wheel-chair accessible loop near the visitor center. Overall, a very good morning.

My wife isn’t feeling the food at our lodge, so we eat a big lunch at Guacimo and then head back to the lodge to make our dinner buffet reservation. We cool off in the pool, and then off to the road for a late afternoon walk down the road outside the lodge, which provides some lovely views and sightings. We get through dinner, and turn in for our final night.

Day 11: I get up early for another walk, joined by a Canadian brother and sister (I believe both are biologists) which produces some more interesting stuff, but mostly it’s just a lovely experience to be outside, walking in warm, comfortable weather, made all the more special by knowing that we are about to return to the cold. I head back to the lodge, hearing the “rawwwkk” sound of macaws echoing very loudly through the parking area of the lodge. I look up and there’s a pair of scarlet macaws in the trees directly above where I’ve parked our car. I alternately snap photos and summon my wife as well as my hiking companions from the morning, and we engage in the appropriate amount of gawking. (at one point, there were also two very colorful male trogons, of different species, in a tree with one of the macaws—sensory overload!) After that, we make it through breakfast, then pack up our stuff and drive back to return our rental car and fly home.

The drive back goes fairly smoothly, with only one missed turn thanks to the GPS (at one point we had to take a double roundabout to get on the road back). We discovered that there’s no easy-off, easy-on gas station between Orotina and the airport, so we resigned ourselves to getting stuck with a healthy refueling charge for the car. But, when we returned the car, Vamos said that when they’d drive us back to the airport, they’d just use your vehicle but first stop by a gas station on the way so we could fill it up and avoid the charge. Great people at Vamos, highly recommended. With that, we paid our exit tax, did the usual airport stuff, and were off on our way back home, connecting again through Panama City (where, since it was a US-bound flight, had the additional TSA-style security theater at the gate). We wound up carrying out boots onto the plane instead of wearing them. We landed at JFK where the immigration/customs situation was a royal pain with long lines despite the automated passport machines. After waiting in the LONG customs line, we weren’t even asked for the customs form we had filled out. Long live bureaucracy.

Overall, another great trip to Costa Rica. Besides the birds, fondest memories include watching the sun rise over Mt. Chirripo from Bosque del Tolomuco, hiking the rainforest at Rio Magnolia with nuestro amigo Palomo, drinking a banana colada while looking at the Pacific ocean in the infinity pool at Tikivillas, and looking at the sunbathed hills and valley around Tarcoles in the late afternoon sun.
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Old Mar 3rd, 2015, 09:33 AM
  #24  
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Final photo set: Carara and Cerro Lodge

https://www.flickr.com/photos/312673...7648813632613/
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 02:36 PM
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RAC, this is a wonderful report - what a fun read; your pictures are gorgeous. Thanks for posting all this good info. I especially love the wonderful quetzal photos. A guide pointed out an ornate hawk eagle to us in the Arenal area - they really are amazing. If you had to pick just one spot, which one was your favorite for birding?
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Old Mar 4th, 2015, 04:33 PM
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Oh jeez, that's a tough one. Part of it depends on what a person has seen before.

I would probably say that Rio Magnolia was the best place to bird by itself (really can't argue with ornate hawk-eagle, white-tipped sicklebill, white-crested coquette before lunch) but I'd say Bosque del tolomuco would make a better place to see for birds-oriented trip, since from there you're an hour away from Los Cusingos, from Cerro de Muerte, from Chirripo, from Las Quebradas, about 75 minutes from Hacienda Baru, in addition to having the Mirador about 3 minutes away. I got great birds at that specific site too--red-headed barbet (main target bird), bare-shanked screech owl, black-breasted wood quail, spotted wood quail, bicolored hawk).

We saw a lot of stuff at Cerro Lodge/Rio Tarcoles/Carara--but the vast majority of the birds we had already seen before.

Tomorrow I'll post lists of the most interesting birds at each spot and people can make up their own minds.
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Old Mar 5th, 2015, 09:52 AM
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Okay, that sounds great. Glad you got some good stuff checked off your life list.
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Old Mar 5th, 2015, 10:05 AM
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In terms of wildlife/bird sightings (305 species of bird total):

Paraiso Quetzal (lodge plus tour):

Ruddy pigeon, green violet-ear, magnificent hummingbird, fiery-throated hummingbird, volcano hummingbird, resplendent quetzal, black-billed nightingale thrush, sooty thrush, mountain thrush, clay-colored thrush, black-and-yellow silky-flycatcher, long-tailed silky-flycatcher, Wilson's warbler, collared redstart, slaty flowerpiercer, large-footed finch, rufous-collared sparrow, sooty-capped chlorospingus, bronzed cowbird

Bosque del Tolomuco/Mirador del Valle General/Centro Biologico "Las Quebradas":

Black-breasted wood quail, spotted wood quail, turkey vulture, black vulture, white hawk, short-tailed hawk, broad-winged hawk, swallow-tailed kite, bicolored hawk, scaled pigeon, ruddy pigeon, short-billed pigeon, white-tipped dove, ruddy ground dovegray-necked wood-rail common pauraque, squirrel cuckoo, bare-shanked screech owl, green hermit, long-billed hermit, plain-capped starthroat, white-crested coquette (female only), magenta-throated woodstar, white-throated mountain-gem, scintillant hummingbird, green-crowned brilliant, violet sabrewing, stripe-tailed hummingbird, white-tailed emerald, snowy-bellied hummingbird, rufous-tailed hummingbird, collared trogon, blue-crowned motmot, rufous-tailed jacamar, red-headed barbet, black-mandibled toucan, sulphur-winged parakeet, slaty antwren, red-crowned woodpecker, spotted barbtail, buff-throated foliage-gleaner, slaty-capped flycatcher, scale-crested pygmy-tyrant, white-throated spadebill, yellow-bellied flycatcher, mountain elaenia, bright-rumped Attila, dusky-capped flycatcher, paltry tyrannulet, social flycatcher, golden-bellied flycatcher, great crested flycatcher, great kiskadee, tropical kingbird, white-ruffed manakin, yellow-winged vireo, brown-capped vireo, Philadelphia vireo, rufous-browed peppershrike, brown jay, blue-and-white swallow, scaly-breasted wren, ochraceous wren, white-breasted wood wren, gray-breasted wood wren, black-faced solitaire, ruddy-capped nightingale thrush, orange-billed nightingale thrush,clay-colored thrush, white-throated thrush, golden-winged warbler, black-and-white warbler, Blackburnian warbler, Tennessee warbler, tropical parula, townsend's warbler, golden-crowned warbler, slate-throated redstart, cherrie's tanager, blue-gray tanager, golden-hooded tanager, speckled tanager, spangle-cheeked tanager, plain-colored tanager, bay-headed tanager, silver-throated tanager, scarlet-thighed dacnis, slaty flowerpiercer, variable seedeater, bananaquit, buff-throated saltator, chestnut-capped brush-finch, white-naped brush-finch, rufous-collared sparrow, common chlorospingus, hepatic tanager, summer tanager, flame-colored tanager, white-winged tanager, red-crowned ant-tanager, Baltimore oriole, great-tailed grackle, spot-crowned euphonia

plus a spider monkey on the trails and (probably) an olingo on our cabin's roof

Rio magnolia nature lodge:

Great tinamou, little tinamou, crested guan, black vulture, turkey vulture, king vulture, gray-headed kite, swallow-tailed kite, ornate hawk-eagle, roadside hawk, broad-winged hawk, short-tailed hawk, gray-necked wood-rail, scaled igeon, ruddy pigeon, short-billed pigeon, ruddy ground-dove, white-tipped dove, common pauraque, white-collared swift, Costa Rican swift, white-necked Jacobin, white-tipped sicklebill, green hermit, white-crested coquette (male), violet-headed hummingbird, scaly-breasted hummingbird, violet crowned woodnymph, rufous-tailed hummingbird, blue-throated goldentail, slaty-tailed trogon, black-throated trogon, black-mandibled toucan, golden-naped woodpecker, red-crowned woodpecker, bat falcon, brown-hooded parrot, white-crowned parrot, crimson-fronted parakeet, black-hooded antshrike, russet antshrike, black-faced antthrush, wedge-billed woodcreeper, streak-headed woodcreeper, lesser elaenia, paltry tyrannulet, eye-ringed flatbill, golden-crowned spadebill, dark pewee, yellow-bellied flycatcher, rufous mourner, great kiskadee, boat-billed flycatcher, social flycatcher, streaked flycatcher, rufous piha, masked tityra, northern schiffornis, rose-throated becard, Philadelphia vireo, house wren, plain wren, clay-colored thrush, worm-eating warbler, buff-rumped warmbler, black-and-white warbler, Tennessee warbler, chestnut-sided warbler, gray-headed tanager, white-shouldered tanager, white-throated shrike-tanager, cherrie's tanager, blue-gray tanager, palm tanager, golden-hooded tanager, bay-headed tanager, silver-throated tanager, green honeycreeper, variable seedeater, bananaquit, yellow-faced grassquit, buff-throated saltator, sreaked saltator, orange-billed sparrow, summer tanager, black-thighed grosbeak, blue-black grosbeak, great-tailed grackle, spot-crowned euphonia

Also saw: two sloths

Los Cusingos:

Great tinamou, little tinamou, black vulture, turkey vulture, swallow-tailed kite, roadside hawk, short-tailed hawk, ruddy quail-dove, white-tipped dove, squirrel cuckoo, long-billed hermit, long-billed starthroat, violet crowned woodnymph, charming hummingbird, rufous-tailed hummingbird, slaty-tailed trogon, gartered trogon, black-throated trogon, fiery-billed aracari, black-mandibled toucan, olivaceous piculet, smoky-brown woodpecker, pale-billed woodpecker, crested carara, brown-hooded parrot, white-crowned parrot, crimson-fronted parakeet, black-hooded antshrike, dot-winged antwren, black-faced antthrush, cocoa woodcreeper, plain xenops, ochre-bellied flycatcher, paltry tyrannulet, common tody-flycatcher, eye-ringed flatbill, yellow-olive flycatcher, golden-crowned spadebill, ruddy-tailed flycatcher, social flycatcher, turquoise cotinga, rufous piha, blue-crowned manakin, red-capped manakin, orange-collared manakin, yellow-throated vireo, lesser greenlet, green shrike-vireo, riverside wren, white-breasted wood wren, long-billed gnatwren, tropical gnatcatcher, clay-colored thrush, Tennessee warbler, chestnut-sided warbler, buff-rumped warbler, gray-headed tanager, white-shouldered tanager, cherrie's tanager, blue-gray tanager, palm tanager, golden-hooded tanager, speckled tanager, bay-headed tanager, silver-throated tanager, blue dacnis, shining honeycreeper, red-legged honeycreeper, green honeycreeper, bananaquit, yellow-faced grassquit, buff-throated saltator, orange-billed sparrow, rufous-collared sparrow, summer tanager, yellow-crowned euphonia

Tikivillas/Uvita/south Pacific boat tours:

Gray-headed chachalaca, magnificent frigatebird, brown pelican, brown booby, masked booby, neotropic cormorant,great egret, snowy egret, great blue heron, little blue heron, cattle egret, green heron, yellow-crowned night heron, boat-billed heron, white ibis, wood stork, black vulture, turkey vulture, king vulture, broad-winged hawk, short-tailed hawk, osprey, mangrove black-hawk, American oystercatcher, willet, western sandpiper, whimbrel, spotted sandpiper, least sandpiper, black-bellied plover, laughing gull, royal tern, ringed kingfisher,short-billed pigeon, white-tipped dove, ruddy ground-dove, chestnut-collared swift, white-collared swift, Costa Rican swift, lesser swallow-tailed swift, rufous-tailed hummingbird, blue-crowned motmot, fiery-billed aracari, black-mandibled toucan, golden-naped woodpecker, red-crowned woodpecker, crested carara, laughing falcon, yellow-headed carara, peregrine falcon, orange-chinned parakeet, brown-hooded parrot, red-lored parrot, crimson-fronted parakeet, scarlet macaw, tawny-winged woodcreeper, southern beardless-tyrannulet, dusky-capped flycatcher, great crested flycatcher, great kiskadee, social flycatcher, boat-billed flycatcher, tropical kingbird, western kingbird, cinnamon becard, mangrove swallow, southern rough-winged swallow, bank swallow brown jay, house wren, plain wren, clay-colored thrush, Tennessee warbler, yellow warbler, chestnut-sided warbler, cherrie's tanager, blue-gray tanager, palm tanager, prothonotary warbler, blue dacnis, red-legged honeycreeper, variable seedeater, bananaquit, yellow-faced grassquit, black-striped sparrow, summer tanager, Baltimore oriole, chestnut-headed oropendola, yellow-crowned euphonia

also saw: white-faced monkey, American crocodile

Carara national park, Rio Tarcoles and Cerro Lodge:

Great tinamou, Black-bellied whistling duck, Muscovy duck, blue-winged teal, neotropic cormorant, anhinga, great egret, cattle egret, snowy egret, great blue heron, little blue heron, tricolored heron, yellow-crowned night-heron, bare-throated tiger heron, green heron, white ibis, black vulture, turkey vulture, osprey, mangrove black hawk, crane hawk, roadside hawk, purple gallinule, northern jacana, black-necked stilt, whimbrel, willet, least sandpiper, spotted sandpiper, double-striped thick-knee, red-billed pigeon, inca dove, common ground-dove, ruddy ground-dove, white-tipped dove, white-winged dove, squirrel cuckoo, groove-billed ani, smooth-billed ani, long-billed hermit, rufous-tailed hummingbird, purple-crowned fairy, cinnamon hummingbird, ruby-throated hummingbird, black-headed trogon, black-throated trogon, gartered trogon, turquoise-browed motmot, blue-crowned motmot, amazon kingfisher, green kingfisher, American pygmy kingfisher,red-crowned woodpecker, Hoffman's woodpecker, lineated woodpecker, pale-billed woodpecker, crested caracara, yellow-headed caracara, orange-chinned parakeet, orange-fronted parakeet, white-crowned parrot, red-lored parrot, crimson-fronted parakeet, scarlet macaw, black-hooded antshrike, dot-winged antwren, cocoa woodcreeper, black-striped woodcreeper, streak-headed woodcreeper, least flycatcher, bright-rumped attila, northern beardless-tyrannulet, northern bentbill, common tody-flycatcher, tropical pewee, dusky-capped flycatcher, nutting's flycatcher, panama flycatcher, brown-crested flycatcher, great-crested flycatcher, great kiskadee, boat-billed flycatcher, social flycatcher, tropical kingbird, western kingbird, red-capped manakin, three-wattled bellbird, masked tityra, yellow-throated vireo, northern rough-winged swallow, gray-breasted martin, mangrove swallow, barn swallow,riverside wren, rufous-naped wren, rufous-and-white wren, white-lored gnatcatcher, clay-colored thrush, prothonotary warbler, Tennessee warbler, worm-eating warbler, yellow warbler, blue-gray warbler, red-legged honeycreeper, cherrie's tanager, blue-gray tanager, white-shouldered tanager, bay-headed tanager, grayish saltator, variable seedeater, white-collared seedeater, stripe-headed sparrow, summer tanager, indigo bunting, red-winged blackbird, great-tailed grackle, bronzed cowbird, giant cowbird, Baltimore oriole, Montezuma oropendola, scrub euphonia, yellow-crowned euphonia, yellow-throated euphonia

also saw: bats and tons of crocodiles
RAC is offline  
Old Mar 5th, 2015, 04:14 PM
  #29  
 
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Wow, that's an amazing list - thanks for posting it.
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