Your Top Ten English Cities?

Apr 6th, 2007, 06:41 AM
  #1  
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Your Top Ten English Cities?

How about rating English cities outside London you've been to - criteria is not necessarily gorgeous places but how much you liked the place, for whatever reason. (Not Scotland or Wales, just England.) And rank in order from #1 to #10 please.

MY TOP TEN
1-Blackpool
2-Oxford
3-Cambridge
4-York
5-Bath
6-Salisbury
7-Winchester
8-Lincoln
9-Chester
10-Shrewsbury
ALSO RANS
Stratford-upon-Avon, Liverpool, Durham
PalenQ is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 08:01 AM
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Technucally Blackpool and Stratford are towns not cities (sorry I'm being pedantic).
If I can include towns, and maybe villages too, then:
Oxford
Chester
Lincoln
Wantage
Shrewsbury
Hereford
Sandwich
Glastonbury
York
Ambleside
hetismij is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 08:12 AM
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"Technucally (sic) Blackpool and Stratford are towns not cities "

Neither is Shrewsbury, but I think Bob's writing in his local dialect, in which "city" is a less precise term than in English . And in which, unlike Standard American, "criteria" appears to be a singular noun.
flanneruk is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 08:41 AM
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so shouldn't you say 'criteria' appear to be a single noun?
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Apr 6th, 2007, 08:52 AM
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1. Oxford
2. Bath
3. Winchester
4. Glastonbury
5. Wells
6. Windsor/Eton
7. Stratford
8. Canterbury
9. Salisbury
10. Liverpool
11. Reading
12. Basingstoke (!)

Villages:
1. Turville ("Vicar of Dibley" and Windmill House from "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" are both in this small village between London and Oxford)
2. Bourton-On-The-Water
3. Lower and Upper Slaughter
4. Bibury
5. Kent countryside (Leeds Castle, Hever Castle, Chartwell)
6. Chedworth
7. Chawton/Alton
8. Old Basing
KE1TH is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 09:29 AM
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Pedantry is Perfectly Permissible, Pal.

Criterion, as in Criterion Place, a redevelopment site in Leeds (not on my list BTW) that will feature enormous erections.
Gardyloo is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 09:52 AM
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So glad you all are ranking Oxford above Cambridge!

I haven't been to very many English cities, but here is what I would say.

Oxford
Bath
Canterbury
Bristol
JoeTro is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 09:57 AM
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If towns and villages are acceptable, then:

1) York
2) Harrogate
3) Whitby/Scarborough/Robin Hood's Bay
4) Keld/Muker/other Dales villages
5) Glastonbury
6) Broadway/Chipping Campden
7) Helmsley
8) Hay-on-Wye
9) Windermere/Bowness
10) Kenilworth (my home town!)

TaniaP is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 09:58 AM
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I love pendantry and that's in part why i love flanner's posts so much.

I graduated with a major in English language from one of the top U.S. colleges but still don't know standard American! That said though i think most of us would say, incorrectly, the critera is when should be criterion is or critera are - criterion is rarely used in any case no matter what the criteria are.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 10:57 AM
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Unranked:

Hull
Newcastle
Liverpool
Manchester
Wigan
Wolverhampton
Sheffield
Birmingham
Bristol
Stoke

Not really; I just wanted to be the only person nominating Stoke, Wolverhampton, Hull, etc. And I prefer my cities decayed and industrial, not half-timbered and twee.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 11:13 AM
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Actually i may have in retrospect put Bristol on my list - was there last year and great restored docks area plus cathedral, university on hill - surprisingly nice albeit industrial heritage city.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 11:39 AM
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Okay, I’m (happily) surprised at how many times Liverpool pops up…I’ve been to England a few times, 7 or 8 I reckon, but have never gone to “Lidypool” because I've never heard anyone, particularly the English people I’ve known, say much nice about it. Actually, I’ve never heard ANYTHING nice about it. In fact one lady actively advised me against it, saying, “there’s nothing much to and I’m afraid that in the end you’ll find it quite depressing…”this was a bit of a disappointment to me because I had always harbored a desire to go there, if nothing else because of it’s history in the world of pop music.
So, tell me someone what I’m missing…I will post this as a new thread and see what folks have to tell me.
DiAblo is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 11:48 AM
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And in which, unlike Standard American, "criteria" appears to be a singular noun.

so shouldn't you say 'criteria' appear to be a single noun?

Regardless of the potential charm of pedantry, the first sentence is indeed correct. The subject of the sentence is 'criteria' as a word: "Unlike Standard American, the word 'criteria' appears to be a singular noun."

Thus you have:
Oceans are full of water.
but:
'Oceans' is spelled 'o-c-e-a-n-s.'
noe847 is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 12:36 PM
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Sorry for the typo in my first post.

fnarf999 - I would put Hull in my also rans, I love it for the Land of Green Ginger if nothing else!
And Manchester and Oldham hold fond memories - DH comes from Oldham. (Well someone has to..)
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Apr 8th, 2007, 10:05 AM
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Oh hell - just to add to the pedantry on here. The OP made it clear that it was England only, and Hay-on-Wye is most certainly not in England (despite what the Rough Guide may think!).
AR is offline  
Apr 8th, 2007, 12:14 PM
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Y Gelli (Hay-on-Wye) is indeed Welsh, though the Post Office as well as the Rough Guide may beg to differ.
hetismij is offline  
Apr 9th, 2007, 05:58 AM
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Back to what is a city in the English sense - Shrewsbury is not a city surprised me - must have little to do with size - perhaps Milton Keynes could boom into a million or so place and would never be able to call itself a city?

Is a city in the English context simply one that has a cathedral - thus St Davids (in Wales, however) and Wells would be cities but bigger Shrewsbury would not be?

What does the word city mean in England?

Thanks
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Apr 9th, 2007, 10:22 AM
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These days it's granted by the government (technically the crown): here's some official info: http://www.dca.gov.uk/constitution/city/cityhome.htm
Nonconformist is offline  
Apr 9th, 2007, 01:43 PM
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AR
 
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Nonconformist's link answers the question succinctly.

However, St David's (Tyddewi) in Wales wasn't a city merely because it had a cathedral but was only given city status by the Queen in 1995. It is the UK's smallest city.
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