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Why Do Europeans Call It "MacDonalds" ???

Why Do Europeans Call It "MacDonalds" ???

Old Aug 30th, 2013, 02:38 PM
  #21  
 
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"Europeans" = at least 50 languages, each with their own pronunciations.

The French will usually pronounce "Mac" in full, and even spell it as a separate word, even where the customary spelling might be McWhatever (e.g., the actor Patrick McGoohan). I guess most of the others would follow suit, because, in the languages I have any familiarity with, it probably wouldn't be obvious or logical to them to pronounce it the way we do in Britain: which, as hetismij says, is usually with at most a "schwa" between the M and the C, whether the a is there or not.

There may be variations in different parts of the country, though as far as I know, nothing distinctive to Cornwall in particular (where they have completely different sorts of names, but that's another matter, best discussed over a cream tea).
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Old Aug 30th, 2013, 05:00 PM
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in the us it is mick donalds - or mickey d. never mac anything.

is there no difference in pronunciation between mc and mac?
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Old Aug 30th, 2013, 05:02 PM
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oh - and there was jut a tv spot - mick clearly.
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Old Aug 30th, 2013, 08:11 PM
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Oh, who cares already?

Just go to Little Chef for a prawn sarnie.

You "French" son would call it Petit Chef.

I never eat at Mickey D's because they don't have a bar.

Thin
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Old Aug 30th, 2013, 10:25 PM
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>>Just go to Little Chef for a prawn sarnie.
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Old Aug 30th, 2013, 11:56 PM
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In Australia we call it Maccas
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 12:48 AM
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Saffyrose is right, we Australians can create slang out of almost anything.
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 12:50 AM
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So Americans call the burger a Big Mick instead of a Big Mac?
I don't think so.
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 01:25 AM
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I have always wondered this myself. As a Canadian I pronounce Mc as mick and Mac as mack. The restaurant is spelled McDonalds and so Canadians (well everyone that I know) pronounce it MickDonalds. Big Mac is therefore a Big Mack.

The first time I heard MacDonalds was in the movie About a Boy and it has confused me ever sense haha...
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 01:26 AM
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Ever since...stupid autocorrect!
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 01:32 AM
  #31  
 
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So you go to MICK Donalds to eat a big MAC. Where does the Mac come from then?
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 01:41 AM
  #32  
 
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Yup! No idea where it comes from, that's just the way it's spelled haha...never gave it much though before!

Guessing it does come from the name McDonalds, but there is no such word as Mc so they went with Mac....?
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 01:55 AM
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I'm Australian and pronounce Mac and Mc the same - Mac, with the "a" soft/ blurred. M'c if you will.

"Mickey D" or "Mic Donald's" is not something you'd expect to hear here. And it would be quite rare to hear "Starbucks" at all.
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 02:03 AM
  #34  
 
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What they can at least be relied on for is the (usually clean) presence of a McToilet - that is one of the few reasons to seek them out in a culturally and gastronomically diverse and exiting region!
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 02:59 AM
  #35  
 
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I know a song about this:
In German and original: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEeaED5bq-4
And there there is the dance:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3aXzMkJlgs
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 03:47 AM
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It's a bit like the Chunnel discussion; I have never ever heard a European refer the the Channel Tunnel as Chunnel. But apparently Americans call it that and some fodorites insist it's the name everyone uses.
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 04:32 AM
  #37  
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So Americans call the burger a Big Mick instead of a Big Mac?
I don't think so>

very interesting point - very very interesting!
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 04:54 AM
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What I find them best for while traveling in europe is a relible large diet coke with a tone of ice. I don;t need a burger or fries or whatever - but after about a week I'm dying for a really large, icy diet coke.

As for Big Mac - yes - that's how it;s spelled so that's what it's called - Mack.
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 06:11 AM
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Mc and Mac are indistinguishable. Pronunciation is regional, even in the US, so one hears both "Mick" and "Mac", depending on where one happens to be.

There used to be a lot of nonsense about Scots named McDonald being Roman Catholic while Prods were MacDonald. It isn't true.

In US newspapers of the 19th century, these names were usually abbreviated with an apostrophe (e.g. civil war general M'Llelan) since even members of the same family spelled it differently.

Not to worry.
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Old Aug 31st, 2013, 06:29 AM
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>>So Americans call the burger a Big Mick instead of a Big Mac?
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