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Why canít cantaloupes taste as good in the US as they do in France!?!

Why canít cantaloupes taste as good in the US as they do in France!?!

Old Jul 17th, 2018, 10:44 AM
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Why canít cantaloupes taste as good in the US as they do in France!?!

I just ate what may have been the best cantaloupe Iíve had in the last 10 years Those mealy, flavorless, barely orange excuses for fruit in the US should be banned as a crime against humanity!
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 10:54 AM
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No kidding! I didn't even eat melon in the USA. Here, I devour them. Have you tried the cavaillons or the long dark green ones? They're all amazing.

I think it's the horse manure and lack of pesticides.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 12:31 PM
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I think itís also because they ripen on the vine and not in a refrigerated truck 3000 miles away from where they are eaten
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 12:34 PM
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If you shop at farmers markets, you can sometimes get good varieties.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 12:38 PM
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It could also be the varieties that the local farmers are growing. If you are at a farmer's market, ask them. My dad is on a quest to find the best melon to plant. I'd love to hear what you find out. Of course, the seed may not even be available here but we'll cross that bridge later.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 01:43 PM
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My USA solution is only to buy melons marked down for a rotten spot. While all the other melons in its box were picked green, the one that later started to rot was accidentally picked ripe. Of course, in late summer and beyond, the local melons come in at the farmers markets, fully ripe and fully expensive. But worth every penny.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 02:06 PM
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Our local supermarkets (northern California) carry a decent variety of melons. Our favorites are the Galias, which can give a Cavaillon a run for the money. But Sugar Kiss are also good. Our favorite, though, is a nicely ripe Crenshaw. Unfortunately, those are usually monster size--but still fabulous. Serving a slice with a bit of prosciutto is a wonderful treat.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 02:07 PM
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We planted Cavaillon seeds once and got nice vines, but no fruit.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 03:26 PM
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We're growing Cavaillons this year. Will let you know how they turn out.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 03:30 PM
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Those mealy, flavorless, barely orange excuses for fruit in the US should be banned as a crime against humanity!>

Where you buying those melons from? Our local farmer's market has some sellers sepcializing in all kind of melons and can't compare with France but I assure you they don't taste at all like those melons you buy in U.S.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 09:41 PM
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Actually, quite a few of the Charentais cantaloupes sold in France come from Morocco and Spain -- but most of them are still picked at the proper time with correct ripeness and flavor. Nevertheless, when the French ones finally come on the market, there is a stampede to buy them.
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Old Jul 17th, 2018, 11:31 PM
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LOL! Iím happy that other people are also passionate about their fruit, and while I may have been using just a wee bit of hyperbole for effect in my original post ;-), the typical cantaloup one finds in a restaurant and the supermarket in the US bares litttle resemblance to what one finds here. I agree that in the US itís probably necessary to grow your own or go to a farmers market to find something decent, but I bought this from a typical supermarket with no extra effort and just grabbed the first one I saw. Good fruit is just more accessible and expected here. At the risk of sounding like my parents (it was bound to happen) thatís how I remember fruit tasting when I was a kid.
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Old Jul 18th, 2018, 05:02 AM
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We were served Cavaillon melon at an apero and the hostess ruefully said that the price never goes down, even when there's a glut of local melons in the summer.

The second best cantaloupe I ever had was at a French restaurant in the Catskills. I complimented the hostess and she said she always got them cheaply from the supermarket's overripe fruit cart, and we're not talking about a fancy supermarket.

The best ever was from Lancaster County, PA. A young Amish girl offered to pick a ripe one for us. And she did, handling every cantaloupe on the counter, sniffing them and gently feeling them. She picked a doozy and the fragrance was powerful. We had a two-hour drive home and could hardly wait to taste it. It was delicious.
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Old Jul 18th, 2018, 07:58 AM
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Cantalope were tasteless in all the hotel breakfasts I ate in Poland.
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Old Jul 18th, 2018, 08:30 AM
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It is not only cantaloupe. Tomatoes are on my list too. My theory is that so many people have never tasted good fresh fruit. They don't know the difference. The fruit has been
altered for thick skins (for shipping) and long shelf life. Taste doesn't seem to matter. And most people don't know how sweet corn should taste. I see it sitting in the supermarket with the dry husks and shoppers buying it.
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Old Jul 18th, 2018, 09:30 AM
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Like Gomiki said, so many fruits and veg in the US, especially melons (and strawberries) have been bred for shipping ease, shelf life, and appearance. Taste does not enter into the equation, except if all the rest has been met first. My US home has access to California's best summer production, so it's possible to buy fully vine-ripped heirloom varieties. The supermarkets generally benefit from that access, and I generally only buy the hybrid "tuscan-style" that was hybridized from Italian seed stock. Some of that original flavor is still there.
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Old Jul 18th, 2018, 10:53 AM
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Correction: we planted Charentais seeds.

Right now we have a big Crenshaw, a nicely ripe Galia, and a mystery melon that tastes a bit like a Tuscan. A Juan Canary is in line. I live for melon season!
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Old Jul 18th, 2018, 09:55 PM
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I was taught by a specialist that sniffing and thumping melons is not the best way to check for ripeness. I have learned that one of the most important details is whether the stem is withered a bit or not. A withered stem means that the melon had reached maturity. A non-withered stem means that the melon was not completely ripe yet when it was harvested.
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Old Jul 18th, 2018, 11:45 PM
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Itís the strawberries of my youth that I bemoan. They just donít taste like strawberries any more, even when I buy them st the farm. And the texture is not right. Ah well will just have to savor those delightful straw babies that we buy in Southern France. Looking forward to more this year.
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Old Jul 19th, 2018, 03:45 AM
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THanks for the stem tip!

I try to buy at local Farmers market if I can.But, I have tasted quite a few like you describe. I wonder if the rain makes at taste difference? ITs been a long dry summer here and I don't think the tomatoes are as tasty.
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