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Which London neighborhood is most like New York's Upper West Side?

Which London neighborhood is most like New York's Upper West Side?

Dec 10th, 2001, 06:30 AM
  #1  
jpg
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Which London neighborhood is most like New York's Upper West Side?

Hello,

Planning my first trip to London and am looking for neighborhood advice. I've read and webbed and can't really seem to zero in on the answer to this question, though.

I'll be by myself, so people, bars, shops, restaurants and good access are important. In short, I'd love something that feels "neighborhoody" because it is, like the Upper West Side. (My old neighborhood.)

Thanks in advance!
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 07:19 AM
  #2  
JOdy
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HAven't been to UWS in ages, but from what you describe, I'd pick, and I always do, the area from south kensington tube to Glouster rd tube stations. All kinds of shops, pubs, all price ranges in restaurants, private home, a few larger hotels and many small boutique types.There are all kinds of service shops available too, dry cleaners, laundry, pharmacy and grocery shops. Left from Brompton Rd you can walk to Fulham Rd with designer shops, flower shops and market and to Kings rd with all sorts of neigborhoody things. Going to your right from Brompton, you are in walking distance to harrods, Beauchamp Pla and several museums.

We never would even think of staying anywhere else
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 07:19 AM
  #3  
Jean Valjean
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St. James?
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 07:47 AM
  #4  
Ursula
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Knightsbridge, maybe?
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 08:23 AM
  #5  
david west
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I have no idea what the NY neighbourhood you're describing is like so this may be pretty useless advice....
but from the description I wold say a few places jump out.

1) Notting Hill, it is just like the film (but not all white in real life!). Can be pricey though. Is somewhere that people actually live (rich people)

2) Putney: Cheaper with great night life and about a milion restaurants bars etc. Good tube access.

3) Hampstead/Highgate: Villages in London (expensive)

I would avoid South Ken and Bayswater if you want to feel a part of an area as these are dominated by tourists. South Ken also has the worst selection of pubs in London, bar none.


 
Dec 10th, 2001, 08:31 AM
  #6  
Grasshopper
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JPG, I also don't know what the NYC equivalent is like (being a West Coaster) but I agree with the Glouster Rd. suggestion. And if you're looking for a couple of hotel suggestions try either the Strathmore or Millenium Baileys. That's where I stay when I go by myself and I love the neighborhood feeling. Plus it's an easy walk to Harrods, Kensington Park, anywhere really.
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 09:33 AM
  #7  
janis
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Highgate/Hampstead, Pimlico or Nottinghill. You may be able to tell by the responses to various threads that a LOT of American tourists recommend S. Kens. That is why I avoid it like the plague. Every third voice you hear has an American Accent. If you want to stay in a "comfort zone", South Kensington is fine, BUT I much prefer Pimlico and Highgate. The only downside to Highgate and Hampstead is they are in zone 3 so your tube passes would cost more.
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 10:30 AM
  #8  
jpg
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These suggestions help so much. Thanks to each of you!
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 10:48 AM
  #9  
david
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I prefer The South Ken area. There are few hotels so I don't hear that many tourist voices and I live there. We have some lovely green areas and many conveniences. It is certainly closer in than Hampstead, which could mean a 40 minutes tube ride to get to some of the areas you will want to see. I personally find the Nottinghill area slightly tacky. Pimlico is also nice but not nearly as lively for a single person.
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 11:01 AM
  #10  
egg
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Shoreditch
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 11:18 AM
  #11  
elaine
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Hi jpg
It's hard to translate one city to another, and each person's impressions of a place are different.
I'm a Manhattanite. I've been to London a few times, but obviously I don't know it as well as I know NYC.
If you're looking for a neighborhood in London where you're just as likely to see middle-class parents pushing strollers as you are to see museum-goers, I immediately thought of
Bloomsbury and South Kensington
(which like the Upper West Side doesn't have a great selection of bars, as noted). South Kensington is where I like to stay, and Tube access is excellent.
 
Dec 10th, 2001, 08:12 PM
  #12  
John G
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It is Islington, of course. I can't believe no one said it earlier.
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 12:03 AM
  #13  
amy
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jpg,

i had stated in your other post that i recommend south ken. i actually live here-as do countless other american and french people. i suppose some do think it can be a bit touristy-perhaps it's that you can walk to museums and harrod's. still, i think if you were to take some of the other's advice and locate yourself either nearer to gloucester rd. tube or wander around chelsea you'll find that it is really a residential area.

islington may be a good neighborhood but it may not be as central-perhaps someone else could respond to that.
hampstead is also lovely, but a bit farther out as well. notting hill would be a good choice as it is central and also has good boutiques and restaurants.
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 01:23 AM
  #14  
david west
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Islington:

In real life I work for Islington Council (and bless them but the ratepayers are paying me while I write this, but that's just between us OK?)

I wouldn't recommend that this is a place that a tourist would wish to stay. After dark it gets quite (very) hairy indeed with high levels of street crime and other anti social behaviour. It's also infested with Arsenal fans :0)

Having said that if you stick to Upper St with its collection of (chain) bars and restaurants you'd be fine, but why bother?

Come in the day, wander around Camden Passage antiques market, have a look around Clerkenwell and Smithfield, then get on the tube and go somewhere better!

david
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 05:58 AM
  #15  
Mel
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Let's keep in mind that jpg said this is his/her first trip to London--to me, that would mean keeping within zone 1 so they could use the tube quickly and easily to get everywhere a first-timer wants to go (the main sights). That leaves out areas like Highgate & Hampstead. S. Ken. will feel very familiar and comfortable to someone from the UWS and that will allow him to concentrate on activities instead of navigating.
Nottinghill, if you can find reasonable digs, would also work IMO.

Have a great trip!
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 09:54 AM
  #16  
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Hello, it's me, JPG again -- the original poster.

Thanks everyone, these posts are so very helpful. Indeed, Kensington looks like a safe bet, though many of you (here and elsewhere) seem to note that the pub scene is not optimal. I do spend a lot of time sitting in bars/pubs/restaurants eating, reading and writing -- usually by myself. This is doable in Kensington, no?

I'd love to check out Notting Hill more, as people seem to like it, though haven't had nearly the luck finding good information on it. Are the hotels fewer there?

I've been getting some great quotes from the Kensington-area reasonables in the 50-60# range: Rembrandt, Montana, Cranley, Strathmore...

Again, thanks so much.
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 10:00 AM
  #17  
Grasshopper
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JPG, walk down Glouster towards Kensington Park. You will find pubs, restaurants and even a comfortable Starbucks (yikes, forgive me! But I like it). Also a Partridge market full of fun things. Check out the Bath tub at the shop on the corner. About 3 blocks down from Cromwell is a little Italian restaurant called "da Mario's" ... very good. There's a small internet cafe just kitty corner from the restaurant. I recommend a visit to the Museum of Natural History, if for no other reason that to get a good look at this great building. The displays are very creative as well. I love this area.
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 10:10 AM
  #18  
hmm
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Uh, elaine... you mentioned "If you're looking for a neighborhood in London where you're just as likely to see middle-class parents pushing strollers as you are to see museum-goers..." I don't really think that is a very accurate way to describe the UWS of Manhattan, if indeed you were. If you were, you should make it a point to visit sometime. Things have changed. If you really resided in Manhattan, you probably would already know that.

RE prices on CPW are just as high or higher than those on 5th Avenue and we are certainly not a community of middle aged mothers pushing baby carriages. We have some of the best of what Manhattan has to offer. Therefore, I assume that you are offering to JPG the equivalent in London.
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 10:11 AM
  #19  
hmm
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Uh, elaine... you mentioned "If you're looking for a neighborhood in London where you're just as likely to see middle-class parents pushing strollers as you are to see museum-goers..." I don't really think that is a very accurate way to describe the UWS of Manhattan, if indeed you were. If you were, you should make it a point to visit sometime. Things have changed. If you really resided in Manhattan, you probably would already know that.

RE prices on CPW are just as high or higher than those on 5th Avenue and we are certainly not a community of middle aged mothers pushing baby carriages. We have some of the best of what Manhattan has to offer. Therefore, I assume that you are offering to JPG the equivalent in London.

Sorry for the rambling post, but I happen to be very proud of the UWS and how far it has come in such a short time. Now if only it were as inexpensive as the Upper East Side....
 
Dec 11th, 2001, 11:11 AM
  #20  
puzzled
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By middle-class parents with buggies, the poster meant a mixed residential and commercial area.
What do Americans mean by middle-class? Here it's people like teachers, doctors, lawyers etc.
I sometimes think that what we call middle, you call upper.
 

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