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Where to go for the GREAT British Christmas foods?

Where to go for the GREAT British Christmas foods?

Old Aug 24th, 2007, 02:45 PM
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ira
 
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>"Why would any person eat that, which is fat?"<

Because that is where the flavor is.

>"What do yanks eat at Christmas"
As noted, depends on where you live.

In the South, we have country ham, turkey, collard greens, mashed sweet potatoes, mashed potatoes, biscuits, pimento cheese sandwiches, lots of cakes and pies, sweet tea.



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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 10:23 PM
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Why would any person eat that, which is fat?"

Also - our bodies do actually need to consume fat, something we tend to forget in these days of general over-consumption versus dieting food weirdness. It's an essential for health.

A balanced diet gets around 30% of its calories from fat (which is not the same thing as saying 30% of everything you eat should be fat).

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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 10:24 PM
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Yule logs - my favourite! I always used to make one every year as a kid, admittedly starting with a shop bought swiss roll.

Also - roasted chestnuts!
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 11:16 PM
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I have successfully blotted out all memory of the horrors my sweet mother served us at Christmas in my youth. I remember only the candied carrots. Otherwise, I'm afraid it was another gigantic bird.

The most important Christmas food tradition in the states is expressing contempt for fruitcake, which is a shame, because I'm one of the few and the steadfast who actually LIKE fruitcake. Not nine-year-old fruitcake that still bears the fingerprints of dear departed Aunt Marge, but a nice compact, boozy fruitcake beats any kind of fluffy cake all hollow.

But your talk of trifles and puds and mincemeat makes me very sad and lonesome. For us, Christmas has always meant tragic meals with the vegetarian nieces, who inspect every spoonful of mashed potato to ensure that it is absolutely pepper- or salt-free before daring to consume it. Tales of the face-flushing heat of the excitement of the formation of the lamb glaze are met with blank stares or worse.
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Old Aug 25th, 2007, 01:32 AM
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Memo to self - avoid America at Christmas - no suet puds.

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Old Aug 25th, 2007, 01:48 AM
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PrimeRib for Christmas with roasted potatoes. Dear mother always served Yorkshire Pudding and Plum Pudding for dessert. I served Yorkshire Pudding until the past few years (getting lazy evidently) but Plum Pudding ended when mother stopped cooking for all of us ungrateful people. Veggies are always honey glazed carrots. No brusselsprouts, my silly family won't eat them. But we always have a great green salad with lots of avacados..living in California we live on avacados.
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Old Aug 25th, 2007, 04:58 AM
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Oh yes - Christmas Cake, home made of course, with lashings of marzipan and icing, and topped with a plastic Santa, Robin and Snowman

Christmas afternoon we would all pile into our Nan and Grandad's house with aunties, uncles and cousins. The food my nan prepared used to be dried up ham sandwiches if you were lucky!! The adults were too busy downing Snowballs (advocaat)and beer to care

The good old days of Christmas *sigh*
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Old Aug 25th, 2007, 07:09 AM
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Back to that "consuming fat" argument, I very recently saw a report about the "dangers" of the amazing numbers of mothers who only buy skim or 1% milk and that's what many kids are getting from about age 1. VERY BAD. Yea, fat is good.
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Old Aug 25th, 2007, 02:24 PM
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The best Christmas dinner we ever had was in 1999, when we had wonderful neighbors from France for the year: parents, two boys, one girl, joined for the holidays by papa's parents. We were invited for dinner out on the deck (the weather was nearly 70 in the Sacramento Valley that day) and treated to foie gras and Sauternes, brought by the grandpère. Yum! Then came beef fondue, accompanied by 7 different sauces, followed by grandmère's bûche de Noël, which tasted nothing like the commercial versions. We began with Champagne and had a good red Burgundy (our contribution) with the fondue. What a great meal!
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Old Apr 2nd, 2008, 12:55 PM
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In Cajun country (Louisiana), Christmas is usually a turducken, stuffed with rice dressing (or a honey glazed ham for the lazy), corn macques chow (sauteed corn with onions and spices) or corn souffle, spinach madeline (creamed spinach with onions and garlic), various yeast breads, mashed sweet potatoes (with brandy), pumpkin pie, pecan pie, and ambrosia. All of this served with plenty of wine.

Mmmm good!
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