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Where to go for the GREAT British Christmas foods?

Where to go for the GREAT British Christmas foods?

Old Aug 24th, 2007, 02:44 AM
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Great, so our family is normal about the trifle obsession

I really didn't know that Christmas mince pies used to contain meat, I learn something new everyday.

audere, there is NOTHING healthy about our trifle, I promise. The half bottle of sherry has nuked any trace goodness
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 03:07 AM
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Trifle's got fruit in it and no suet. That practically makes it a health food at Christmas.

What do yanks eat at Christmas? I know they have turkey for Thanksgiving. Surely they don't eat another one a month later?
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 03:23 AM
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Actually a great number of people do eat another turkey a month later.

For Thanksgiving, another "tradition' for many is pumpkin pie; some serve sweet potato pie. There's also macaroni and cheese, the ubiquitous cranberry sauce, and how could I possibly forget green bean casserole, the dish everyone says they hate but it is inevitably the first thing completely eaten up, particularly at holiday office parties.

Some prefer baked ham at Christmas and others will serve roast goose.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 03:44 AM
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We're normally still eating the turkey a month later anyway.

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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 03:53 AM
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This American has Turkey for Thanksgiving, roast beef for Christmas and roast pork with sauerkraut for New Year's day
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 05:02 AM
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Audere, all depends on the American family. Could be turkey, could be ham, could be prime rib, could be Italian. At my brother's in-laws, it's all pasta, all the time. My husband's aunt always has chili Christmas Eve, it's their tradition.

Whatever the family tradition, you do NOT want to mess with it. My mother once made quiche on Christmas Eve. That did not go over well.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 05:28 AM
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Well we're practically having Christmas tonight. I got a gammon, and took last years Christmas pudding out the freezer and invited some friends over. Maybe if I scratch around in the cupboard I'll come across some paper hats too.....

I have to keep busy because I'm getting so excited about our upcoming trip 15th Sept. Can't wait
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 05:49 AM
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And then for some of us there is Hoppin' John on New Years Day.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 05:52 AM
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Weirdos.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 06:25 AM
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You wanted to know, so we told you.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 06:46 AM
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Christmas meals in the UK for me have consisted of cadburys selection boxes and Boddingtons for breakfast. Throughout the day more goodies such as mince pies and the chocolates with the liqours filled with them.
For dinner a roast or turkey of some sort with all the good stuff the MIL makes. Yorkshire puddings, stuffing, brussel sprouts(gross) ...

Its usually great fun at the in-laws house! Beer and chocolate for us 'kids' during the day.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 06:50 AM
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My "Mrs Beeton's Household Management", 1888 ed, has 3 mincemeat recipes.

Lemon mincemeat (1348) has lemons, apples, suet, currant, sugar, candied lemon peel.

Mincemeat (1365) has raisins, currants, beef, suet, sugar, citron, candied lemon peel and orange peel, 1 pottle of apples, lemon rinds and juice, brandy.

Excellent Mincemeat (1366) has the above, without meat and the addition of orange marmalade.

It is suggested that all mincemeats should be made early in December.

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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 11:56 AM
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How can there be a thread on Christmas food without Quality Street being mentioned?

Also, why are there only about 2 purple ones, but 400-500 minging plain toffes per tin?
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 12:09 PM
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Did you try those mega purple ones they launched a year or two ago?

I almost ran home with one, after seeing them covering the checkout. Like eating pure sugar, only nastier.

I spat the second half out, more disappointed than when I saw what my first girlfriend looked like once she'd become a grandmother.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 12:09 PM
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Has anyone mentioned satsumas? Peeling satsumas in front of a roaring fire on Christmas Day. Lovely!

Boxing Day: Roast ham and left over cold turkey with pickle (proper 'Branston' pickle), picallilli, and salad.

Mums home made trifle
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 12:15 PM
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'Did you try those mega purple ones they launched a year or two ago?'

Yes - they looked like purple foiled cornish pasties! Too big for me I'm afraid. Thank god they never made the vile red cracknels in that side.

What about brazil nuts that you can't get into,not even with a sledgehammer, pickled onions and yule log. Not all in one meal, obviously.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 12:15 PM
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This has nothing to do with Christmas foods, but while you're there, you might check to see if the BBC has it's Christmas Crackers concert, or any other concert that might be on at that time. We were there in early December several years ago and found that the concert really put us in the holiday spirit.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 12:16 PM
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'Did you try those mega purple ones they launched a year or two ago?'

Yes - they looked like purple foiled cornish pasties! Too big for me I'm afraid. Thank god they never made the vile red cracknels in that size.

What about brazil nuts that you can't get into, not even with a sledgehammer, pickled onions and yule log. Not all in one meal, obviously.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 12:43 PM
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"Why would any person eat that, which is fat?"

Umm. Maybe for the same reason a person would spread butter (fat) on their bread, or eat FATTED duck liver called foie gras. Or anything cooked in bacon grease, or "larded". In fact most cuisines have a lot of food in which fat is a major ingredient.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 02:02 PM
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"What do yanks eat at Christmas"

I guess it depends on which part of the US you're from. Down here in SE Texas, it's not unusual for us to barbeque a brisket, or a fried turkey is also very popular. Also a turducken, which is a chicken inside of a duck, inside of a turkey, and then roasted. (all bones have been removed). Pumpkin, sweet potato pie, and ambrosia for dessert.
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