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Where to go for the GREAT British Christmas foods?

Where to go for the GREAT British Christmas foods?

Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 03:27 AM
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Hang on, everyone.

Robert A Lee (any relation?) leaves these shores December 4. And says he wants "any good restaurants besides Rules? Something in that price category.
"

Now most of us wouldn't include Rules in any list of places we'd be seen in. And although that's a good time of the year for game, what's the point of going to a restaurant when they practically give it away at most butchers and when Mrs F's a great deal more reliable than any chef at cooking the odd bit of partridge, or one of those pheasants who throw themselves at our car? Or if we're really lucky, one of Mr Marlborough's self-destructive muntjacs?

However, it's clear that some people are less interested in who's just got his third Michelin star than in finding restaurants auditioning for a place in the next Merchant Ivory production.

So where, if he thinks he's going to like that sort of thing, will Robert A Lee find the sort of thing he thinks he'll like?
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 03:34 AM
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"what's the point of going to a restaurant when... Mrs F's a great deal more reliable than any chef at cooking the odd bit of partridge, or one of those pheasants who throw themselves at our car" Sounds like an invitation, flanner ?!
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 03:38 AM
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If The Boss invites people here who threaten to shoot humans for walking dogs in Central London, I'll have a thing or two to bark about it.
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 03:52 AM
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Flannerpooch:

you can come to MY house any time you want and nobody is going to shoot you, that's for certain. The worst that will happen is you'll get spoiled rotten.

Audere_est_Facere: I'll have a meal with you, anytime. What fun <G>!!
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 03:54 AM
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Apparently the Savoy do a nice Christmas Dinner - and you get all the bumfluffery as well.

Needless to say i've never been, as my family are still just about on talking terms with me.

The pub local to my office is now advertising its Christmas menu and taking booking - but that's for pissed people in paper hats.
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 04:34 AM
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That does it then..Flanners place it is..all invited !!!

If you can't get to Flanners, then I suggest M&S who sell every delicious chrissie food known to man.(and woman of course)

M
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 04:40 AM
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>We will be in London from Nov.24-Dec.4.<

Ummm, I'm not a Christian, so I'm not really sure, but isn't Xmas around Dec 25?

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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 04:58 AM
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In English shops Christmas starts in September.

If you want to do something uniquely British and Christamassy on your trip - go and see a Panto - most of the London ones have been announced.

Behind You!
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 05:35 AM
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You are too early for any decent hotel/restaurant Christmas dinners and the ones available will be catering to office booze-ups and the food is nearly always rubbish. You might find the odd place serving mince pies but Christmas pud is really reserved for Christmas day itself. Trifles aren't really a special Christmas thing so you might find them around anyway, but they aren't exactly trendy these days, so you might not.

Best thing would be to stock up on some stuff to take home. Buy a small Christmas pudding (it is very rich and I think rather an acquired taste; unless you've grown up eating it you are not likely to enjoy it much). Most these days microwave very well so you don't have to faff about with steaming etc. Buy a jar of mincemeat (it doesn't actually contain meat these days, it's just dried fruit etc) and bung a dollop on a small circle of pastry in a shallow muffin type tin when you get home, or buy a pack of ready made ones. They are ok, not as nice as really good home-made but nicer than most of the home-made ones I get thrust under my nose. I'm not a huge fan though, one just for the sake of Christmas is plenty for me, and a lot of people don't like them, so again, think small amount.



Buy some Christmas goodies to take home with you.
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 05:37 AM
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What else do I associate with Christmas food nibbles?

A big pack of nuts in their shells and struggling through the walnuts with my wimpy nut-crackers (nice though).

Everyone seems to buy a pack of dates but I never see anyone eating them.

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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 07:44 AM
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lol Nona, your right, and every xmas my parents would make this small table appear from nowhere, we never did find out where it came from. On the table would be every conceivable type of nut and date. No one ever ate them lol but every year they returned.

The mysteries of Christmas !!

M
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 07:57 AM
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The dates my parents used to buy were callled "Eat Me" dates. Never has a food product been less aptly named.
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 07:56 PM
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>>If you want to do something uniquely British and Christamassy on your trip - go and see a Panto - most of the London ones have been announced.<<

Audere, you should post a link to your brilliant pantomime post from Travelers to Go - or copy and paste it here.

Lee Ann
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 08:25 PM
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I have a recipe I found in my grandmother recipe box for making mincemeat. It calls for suet and venison. I'm sure mincemeat originated as a way of preserving scraps of meat. I love mimcemeat pie and make it every Christmas or Thanksgiving..eithe one or the other, but I make it every year. I have not tried to make the mincemeat myself.
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 08:56 PM
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Crefloors, Christmas mincemeat pies are not made from meat!!! And definitely not venison, although they do have suet in them if they are not vegetatian. They are made from fruit mincemeat.

I always thought that sherry trifle at Christmas was a very British thing, am I wrong? My family and my husband's (British grandparents) would never think of having Christmas dinner without trifle (swimming in sherry).
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 09:29 PM
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Mischka - in my (Scottish)family we have always had sherry trifle and Christmas pudding. I think for me the point is to have lots of both left over to enjoy the next day and the day after that. (When I typed this I typed "padding" instead of "pudding" - just about sums it up really!)
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 09:51 PM
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My mother always made a trifle for boxing day, so it's definitely something I associate with the Christmas season.

We used to get those 'Eat me' dates too. I always thought they looked like cockroaches lined up in that little box!
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Old Aug 23rd, 2007, 10:45 PM
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We ALWAYS had trifle on Christmas Day.

But, otherwise, I have nothing to add to the above postings, Robert.
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 12:25 AM
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Mischka, although modern day mincemeat doesn't contain meat, it did in "ye olden days".
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Old Aug 24th, 2007, 02:15 AM
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I've never had trifle at Christmas - it's far too light and healthy.

I've had:

Christmas Pudding (yum)

Mince Pies (double yum)

Brandy Snaps (meh)

Christmas Cake (yum)

All of the above would be eaten with cream, custard or brandy butter while wearing a paper hat.

And of course a tangerine in my stocking. Which would be accompanied by my parents/grandparents telling me that you couldn't get tangerines/bananas during the war.

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