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What would you absolutely NOT take on your trip next time?

What would you absolutely NOT take on your trip next time?

Apr 7th, 1999, 04:52 AM
  #21  
karie
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They make great bags, soft-sided, with wheels and a pull-up handle, and also a carry handle on the side, like a regular suitcase. I found this works great, as you can pull it through the airports, etc., yet carry it over cobblestone street and up stairs. I agree with not carrying a large bag...and only one. I did not take a lot, but did not use most of what I had. I used the "wash it out at night" method, and it was great. Oh, I also took a soft-sided, fold-up duffle inside my luggage, to carry-on my purchases on the trip back home.
 
Apr 7th, 1999, 06:15 AM
  #22  
Brian in Atlanta
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I agree with Juan. After trying to roll my small carry-on through the streets of London and Amsterdam to and from the train station (we're too cheap to take a cab), I've come to realize that those things are not designed for even the smoothest of sidewalks.
What I'd like to find is a suitcase like I saw on a Rick Steve's show once. It's a nylon suitcase with a normal suitcase handle, but it also has attachable straps so that it can be carried like a backpack. If the straps are properly adjusted and the weight is properly distributed within the pack, it should be very comfortable to walk resonably long distances with. Any one know where I can get such a thing?
 
Apr 7th, 1999, 07:44 AM
  #23  
Kristy
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Brian - You can order the bag you described directly from Rick's website (www.ricksteves.com). You might also want to check out the bags at a hiking/outdoors store (REI, for example). I have an Eagle Creek bag that I LOVE! It is carry-on size, has a handle on the side, a shoulder strap, backpack straps AND wheels. So you can carry it comfortably a number of ways, and still be able to wheel it through the airport. It's great! I just can't believe it took me 5 trips to Europe before I bought it....
 
Apr 7th, 1999, 10:03 AM
  #24  
Brian in Atlanta
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Thanks so much Kristy!
 
Apr 7th, 1999, 09:00 PM
  #25  
Dayle
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I also tried out the soft sided backpack style at REI, but when I loaded it with weight (as if it were a backpack) and tried it on, I found it very uncomfortable. I think they are a great idea, but I wouldn't want to count on wearing it that way very far.
 
Apr 8th, 1999, 03:11 AM
  #26  
Juan
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I too have one of those Eagle Creek backpack convertable bags (the straps are hidden behind a flap so it looks like a normal bag when checking into a nice hotel or on planes....no worry about torn straps). Yes, it is not as comfortable as a regular external frame backpack but it has many advantages. I bought mine in 1989 and it has held up very well on many dozens of long trips now. It has a small daypack that zips onto the front too which is helpful when day hiking. I just want to say again that packing light is the #1 thing to learn about comfortable travelling. I had a companion in 1994 once who did not belive me and took *three bags* for himself for our 9 week trip. And I don't mean small hand bags. I told him I would not carry any of his extra bags as I was 100% against him taking them all. So he struggled and struggled with these bags when we went to Paris. After only one difficult (for him) trip from the airport to the hotel he ended up *leaving 2 of the bags* for the whole 9 weeks at the hotel in Paris and traveling on to Spain, Israel and Jordan with just one bag anyways. Then he had to lug those damn bags back across Paris when we left at the end. He learned the hard way. And he never used all those clothes in the 2 extra bags anyways...how silly!
 
Apr 8th, 1999, 11:50 PM
  #27  
Joanna
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I too thought a backpack would be a good option too, but even before I had put anything much in it the bag seemed to weigh a tonne! (ended up buying a trolley to put it on). I have had intermittent back problems, so find the bags with wheels the easiest option - no back strain at all with these. I would take fewer clothes next time, no brolley and forget about pyjamas.
 
Apr 9th, 1999, 03:40 AM
  #28  
Nancy
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I know some Aussie slang like eskies and costume and mozzies but what is a brolley?
 
Apr 9th, 1999, 04:55 AM
  #29  
covadonga
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Umbrella. Itīs also used (sometimes) in Ireland and the U.K.
 
Apr 9th, 1999, 04:59 AM
  #30  
Kerry
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Happy to oglige Nancy. A brolly is an umbrella. By the way - a costume is more commonly known as a cozzie.
 
Apr 9th, 1999, 05:52 AM
  #31  
Andria
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I took way too many clothes on my semester abroad, im usually a really light packer too, but when i was leaving france to come back home, i realized all the clothes i didnt wear....pretty sad. the best thing i learned out of this is that it's ok to leave a lot of stuff behind because you can find it overseas, it's not like travelling in the outback or something.
 

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