Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

What to wear for tea and church in England?

What to wear for tea and church in England?

Jul 6th, 2014, 09:59 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 52,812
i agree, cowboy, but why not take the opportunity to dress up when you get one?
annhig is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 10:04 AM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,306
I honestly don't know why people stress about this. Smart in London = smart in large cities in North America. For afternoon tea you will see people in dresses and people in jeans. As long as you aren't wearing jeans with holes, shorts and tank tops or trainers you will be fine. Same with church.
jamikins is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 10:05 AM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,306
Meant to add - if you want to dress up and use it as an occasion to dress up that is perfectly acceptable as well!
jamikins is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 10:33 AM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 20,751
If it were I, I'd use the occasion to buy a gorgeous hat and wear it both to church and afternoon tea. Great opportunity!
Underhill is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 10:51 AM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 17,337
"Smart in London = smart in large cities in North America."

Not in St Pauls and not in a "posh" tea shop
bilboburgler is online now  
Jul 6th, 2014, 11:31 AM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 280
I thought C of E churches were just grateful to get anyone through the doors these days. Many, many years ago, when I used to go to church as a teenager (nothing much else to do round our way), I wore jeans and no-one batted an eyelid. Old ladies might dress up, and old men wear ties, but I bet younger folk don't. If she's under 70, she'll stick out like a sore thumb and feel dreadfully embarrassed wearing a hat to an ordinary service . Weddings, christenings and other occasions, maybe, evensong no. I really doubt there'll be a bouncer on the door enforcing a dress code.
anicecupoftea is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 11:49 AM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,060
For tea, just look tidy and decorative. I see that F & M do high tea as well as classic afternoon tea, so we cha
Josser is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 11:51 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,060
..before I was rudely interrupted , we chaps can have Welsh rabbit or beef Wellington while our better halves nibble dainty little sandwiches.
Josser is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 12:05 PM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 10,306
Well I have been to many high end 'posh' afternoon teas in London and jeans and a nice top are perfectly acceptable. Even in 2star michelin Sketch afternoon tea jeans were perfectly acceptable...
jamikins is offline  
Jul 6th, 2014, 02:44 PM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 19,912
As far as St Paul's is concerned, I wouldn't have thought it worth worrying whether or not what you're wearing (as opposed to how you behave) will cause a raised eyebrow among the regulars. It's not as though you're trying to get on the flower rota or the coffee morning committee, is it?
PatrickLondon is online now  
Jul 6th, 2014, 06:48 PM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
Those three walking down the street are classic "don't"s - unless they plan to spend the day working on their extremely off vehicles.

Would not send anyone to church like that (the Church ladies in some of our baptists churches would bar them at the door) or to a nicer eating place. Fine for Mickey Ds or a dive bar.
nytraveler is offline  
Jul 7th, 2014, 01:18 AM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 19,912
>>(the Church ladies in some of our baptists churches would bar them at the door)<<

They might perhaps benefit from a re-reading of the bit about "whited sepulchres"....
PatrickLondon is online now  
Jul 7th, 2014, 01:58 AM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 17,337
We are really not helping the OP here. Honestly "smart" in England does not mean jeans. God really will not care and turning up in St Pauls, which is not just a church, dressed incorrectly is not correct.

It is almost unbelievable that any Brit would admonish the OP's daughter, but that is not the Brit way. There will be a raised eyebrow or two until they hear the accent at which point their prejudice will be reinforced.

F&M is clearly showing that standards are declining, that they have to write "smart" on their website means that people have been letting the side down and turning up in jeans.

Rules only need to be writen down when they start being broken.
bilboburgler is online now  
Jul 7th, 2014, 04:23 AM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,580
I think you're right, Bilbo.
Somebody on TripAdvisor complained that standards were slipping. They mentioned jeans, but seemed to think that the rules were being relaxed in deference to people from the East
MissPrism is offline  
Jul 7th, 2014, 05:11 AM
  #35  
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 35,438
Apparently this no jeans stuff applies only to women. I'm IN Europe at the moment and I cannot begin to tell you how many MEN over here, as usual, are wearing jeans, a dress shirt with or without a tie, and a sports coat for doing business. And please don't begin to say that F+M is not going to let them in dressed as such.

As to the raised eyebrows, who the hell cares?
Dukey1 is offline  
Jul 7th, 2014, 05:22 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,760
Judging by this there may not be a strict dress code in F&M
http://www.motherofalltrips.com/2010...num-mason.html
pan down to the photo of the boy drinking a cup of tea. Then look at the footwear of the man in the background! eeeek
ribeirasacra is offline  
Jul 7th, 2014, 05:26 AM
  #37  
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 4,464
there are different restaurants and in the Diamond Jubilee, they specifically state 'We kindly request that guests dress smartly'.
OReilly is offline  
Jul 7th, 2014, 05:49 AM
  #38  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,035
The problem with discussing the appropriate dress for taking tea at F & M, or attending a service at St Pauls is that these are not authentic British experiences, as the vast majority of local people never do them. The other people there will be tourists like yourself, not sure what to do or wear, and not sure if they will actually like it.

You will all be attending a performance, not taking part in an everyday event. The blogger describing the tea with her sons at F & M had deliberately chosen the most expensive (the best?) example, although her son had never drunk tea before. They had probably never eaten sandwiches with the crusts cut off, or scones with jam and cream, plus sweet fancy cakes. I like all of those, but would never expect to have all of them at the same meal. Do they box up what you haven't eaten?
chartley is offline  
Jul 7th, 2014, 09:02 AM
  #39  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,760
*** Do they box up what you haven't eaten?***
Yes sir of course we can provide one with a....ahem... "doggy bag".
ribeirasacra is offline  
Jul 7th, 2014, 09:08 AM
  #40  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,760
*****that these are not authentic British experiences, as the vast majority of local people never do them.*****


I know what you mean.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/pict...n.html?image=6


http://allaboutkatemiddletons.blogsp...am-salute.html
ribeirasacra is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:45 AM.