What to Pack for Italy in January?

Old Jan 18th, 1997, 12:01 PM
  #1  
S.R. Dozier
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What to Pack for Italy in January?

Have spent much past five years in Italy. Depending on the area, you will find it cold and damp. Would never go without my silk undershirt and longjohns. Layering and one basic color are the key for efficient packing. I usually have black jeans, black wool slacks and black wool skirt with white dress blouse, turtlenecks and 2 sweaters of different colors (one casual, one dressier). Prefer to take black walking shoes and black lined boots that will go under skirt or slacks. Have also keyed of navy. Remember that heating is not used much so take wool socks and warm pajamas/gown--may have to add silks underneath. As for eating out, in trattorias in more touristic towns you can eat in jeans or slacks. In nicer restaurants and in smaller towns, I prefer to dress better. If you tell me your destinations, I'd be happy to share more tips. Have advised many friends before.
 
Old Jan 18th, 1997, 12:09 PM
  #2  
S. R. Dozier
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Forgot an essential. VERY warm gloves. Also, a coordinating scarf to wear tied around your neck. Italians dress more formally, an with better color coordination and fashion consciousness than most Americans. They also take care to protect against the cold. If you're traveling alone, as I usually do, it's good to blend as much as possible. If you will be traveling in a group of Americans, you needn't worry. Just take care to stay protected and healthy. Italy is mostly mountains, and the central and northern areas tend to be tougher climates than many Americans live in.
 
Old Jan 19th, 1997, 12:40 PM
  #3  
Vanessa Powell
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Hello! You posted an answer to my question about what to wear. Thank-you very much! You mentioned that you packed in colors (navy and black) so you could save on space. Good thought. You also mentioned long johns, are they really neccessary? I wasn't going to bring them along, but if they are a necessity I will. I have a London Fog rain jacket with a wool liner, will that be warm enough with a sweater beneath it? Any information you give would be exceedingly helpful as I have never been there.
 
Old Jan 19th, 1997, 12:48 PM
  #4  
Vanessa Powell
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Opps! I forgot to mention...I live in Alaska, so there isn't much in the way of cold weather to surprise me! We just got through 2 weeks of -60 temps so I am ready with the winter clothes to bring. My only concern is packing light. I will be going on a tour with my Grandmother...Perillo Tours. It's 2 weeks, Milan, Venice, Florence, Rome, Naples...and little stops in between. Hope that helps. Thanks for your advice, I look forward to hearing from you.
 
Old Jan 19th, 1997, 01:42 PM
  #5  
S. R. Dozier
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I still do advise taking the silk undershirt and leggings, for nights if nothing else--and especially for your grandmother. They take up practically no space or weight and are great insurance. Even in Alaska, I'd bet you have heating at night. The quality of cold you feel in a thick-walled, stone-floored Italian building with no heat in the dead of a wet winter is not to be forgotten. That's another good reason for one pair of wool socks. You might get lucky and have heating all night, but I doubt it. Italian's have laws about how much heating can be used in a day. In the more southern cities, you probably won't need them and, based on Alaska, may wish for shorts in 50 degree weather! Take a lighter weight t-shirt for Naples area, just in case.
For you, anything heavier than silk underclothes probably would be overkill. However, it's easy to underestimate Italian weather because most of the literature speaks of sunny Italy, but remember that ROME (south) is even with New York City.
On a tour, you can get away with more casual clothes. Be guided by their suggestions. The MOST important thing on a tour is to wear comfortable walking shoes with good arch/ankle support and traction. You'll be walked to pieces at the end of each day and those stone streets/stairs can be slick and treacherous in wet weather. If you have any more questions, feel free to ask. I love Italy and enjoy sharing the travel tips I've learned.
Buon viaggio!
 

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