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what to order in rome that you can't get in florence or venice?

what to order in rome that you can't get in florence or venice?

Nov 4th, 2002, 11:06 AM
  #1  
oldorch
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what to order in rome that you can't get in florence or venice?

is there any specific dish or food that you look forward to when visiting these cities?
 
Nov 4th, 2002, 04:16 PM
  #2  
xxx
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topping
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 05:34 AM
  #3  
Eye Spy
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Spaghetti alla carbonara: this is a typical Roman dish -- you can get it elsewhere in Italy but nowhere as good as in Rome!

Filetti di baccala: fried codfish filets. There's a great place just off of Campo de'Fiori.

 
Nov 5th, 2002, 06:06 AM
  #4  
hmm
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Hmmmm... another identity revealed?

Author: Bob ([email protected])
Date: 06/12/2001, 12:25 pm
Message: Hi, Trish!

Regarding restaurants in Rome, they are all over the place.

...

One restaurant that we did follow up on is near Campo dei Fiori. It's kind of tucked inside a small piazza. It's recommended by Rick Steves and it is patronized by locals. It is Filetti di Baccala.
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 07:02 AM
  #5  
Roman resident
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-Bucatini alla Matriciana
Bucatini are spaghettis a bit thicker with a tiny hole inside, matriciana sauce is with tomatoe and bacon, it is to die for...

-Abbacchio al forno con patate arroste
Sheep meat cooked in oven with roast potatoes

-Carciofi alla Giudea
Fried artichokes

-Puntarelle alle alici
Puntarelle are a great vegetable salade that you only find in Rome, it is crunchy and a little bit sour and it is served with a sauce of anchovy, oil and vinegar (or lemon).
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 08:09 AM
  #6  
zootsi
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We also found the Roman 'house wines' to be very good, and different from Tuscany. The typical bread was also very good - crustier and saltier than the bread of Tuscany.
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 08:24 AM
  #7  
oldorch
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thanks
my wife is a chef and i am doing the planning so all imput is appreciated
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 08:31 AM
  #8  
Roma
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The real typical Roman dish would be Coratella alla Romana, fried artichokes with livers,kidneys,brains, delicious and my favourite is La pajata which is a pasta with a tomatoe sauce and the intestines of the suckling veal
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 01:20 PM
  #9  
Rex
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I agree that fried artichokes seem to be a Rome thing (but maybe Tuscany too?)

Baccala (or bacalhao, in Portugal where it is more common than hamburgers) is all over the Mediterranean. And certainly served in lots of places in Venice. As if it is a Venetian specialty.

Best wishes,

Rex
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 01:25 PM
  #10  
Patrick
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I agree with Roman resident about bucatini alla Matriciana. We have one small restaurant with outdoor patio here in Naples, Florida that recreates the dish perfectly. I order it, close my eyes, listen to the help chattering in Italian and pretend I'm in Rome. Last week I went for my fix one night and the waiter informed me they were out of bucatini -- GASP! I wanted to get up and leave. They offered to prepare fettucini or spaghetti the same way, but I didn't take it. It just wouldn't be the same. My favorite dish in Rome!!!
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 01:32 PM
  #11  
pam
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Enjoy the Frascatis.

I think that is 'all' Amatriciana.'
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 01:52 PM
  #12  
KT
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Pam's right. It is all'Amatrician, named after the inhabitants of a town in the Abruzzi.

If you live somewhere where you can get decent ingredients, it's quite easy to make, though you'll probably have to substitute pancetta for guanciale.

Gnocchi, while available all over, are also considered a Roman specialty, as is saltimbocca (veal with prosciutto and sage -- one of those things that make me sorry that I've stopped eating veal.)
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 01:52 PM
  #13  
KT
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Ack! Typo! "All'Amatriciana." Sorry.
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 01:54 PM
  #14  
KT
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Oh, no. I did it again. Another typo. It's "all'Amatriciana" -- I'll go home now and hide in shame.
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 02:35 PM
  #15  
mary kay
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The artichokes Roman style - don't know the Italian name for them. The ones I have in mind are baked, not fried, and seem to be in some sort of lemony, olive oily spicy broth. Would love to know the secret of their preparation, if anyone knows. Every now and then I have a craving for them...

Mary Kay
 
Nov 5th, 2002, 05:19 PM
  #16  
Ira
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mary kay wrote
>The artichokes Roman style - don't know the Italian name for them. <

Perhaps it's Carciofi alla Romana? See Foodtv.com
 
Nov 6th, 2002, 11:19 AM
  #17  
sandi
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Mary Kay, that's exactly what I was going to say! I have been wanting those incredibly wonderful Roman artichokes for 2 years! You descibed that "sauce" exactly. The preparation allowed you to eat every bit of it, including part of the stem. Incredible.
 
Nov 6th, 2002, 11:41 AM
  #18  
cirpi
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KT is incorrect. Bucatina Amatriciana is named after a town in Northern Lazio, not the Abruzzo.
 
Nov 6th, 2002, 11:46 AM
  #19  
cirpi
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Cirpi (yours truly) is incorrect. The correct name for the Roman pasta is bucatini all' amatriciana. Three lashes with a wet noodle.
 
Nov 6th, 2002, 12:31 PM
  #20  
KT
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I admit it, I was wrong. Amatrice is in Lazio, very close to Abruzzo. Just don't tell me that this means I can't have any more of the pasta!
 

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