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-   -   what to eat in BRUSSELS (https://www.fodors.com/community/europe/what-to-eat-in-brussels-147743/)

MABLE Jul 20th, 2001 08:54 PM

what to eat in BRUSSELS
 
PLEASE RECOMMEND SOME SPECIAL FOOD THAT I MUST TRY IN BRUSSELS. SINCE I CAN READ ENGLISH ONLY, ANY PROBLEMS TO ORDER IN THE RESTAURANTS? I READ FROM SOME ARTICLES ABOUT A TYPICAL DISH CALL "STOEMP", ANYBODY KNOWS WHAT IS IT? THANKS.

Babs Jul 20th, 2001 10:50 PM

Hi Mable. Brussels is well known for mussels. Very popular. Also chocolate, but I have a feeling that wasn't what you were thinking. When I was in the Netherlands a dish called "stomppot" (sp) was considered a traditional dish; might be the same. If so it was a meat, beef or whatever, cooked with other vegetables, mashed potatoes blended with sauerkraut - real "home cooking" dish. My description doesn't sound so good, but really delish! Hope someone else will post who can do a better job of answering your question than I.

Myriam Jul 21st, 2001 12:56 AM

STOEMP is mashed potatoes mixed with vegetables like endive, or spinach, or some other vegetables. When I make it (like my mother and grandmother make it) we do not put meat in it. <BR>MOSSELEN/MOULES (mussels) are of course a MUST when you're in Belgium. Officially the season starts on August 8th (14 days late because of the bad growing!) but you can find them in many restaurants already. <BR>GEGRATINEERD WITLOOF/CHICONS AU GRATIN is also typical food. Chicory rolled in ham and served in a cheese sauce "au gratin". <BR>GENTSE WATERZOOI is another one: the original waterzooi is a creamy kind of soup made with chicken and vegetables. It is a one-pan dish served as a main course. <BR>Smakelijk/Bon appétit!

Liz Jul 21st, 2001 05:14 AM

And of course, Frites, and waffles! Don't worry about language - we had no trouble in Brussels and Brugge using just English, and most menus had english translations on them. All the waiters, etc. seemes amazingly mult-lingual, I was VERY impressed.

ihateteenagers Jul 22nd, 2001 12:27 AM

Your English isn't good enough to pass for a native English speaker. <BR> <BR>Your native tongue is probably German or Flemish; your syntax is a dead giveaway. Why are you trying to pass as an English speaker?

Jerry Jul 25th, 2001 07:01 AM

Mable, <BR> <BR>Also consider going to a sandwich shop, sometimes they are called just 'snack' and try one of a dizzying array of salads that you can order on a sandwich. <BR>3 tuna salads, 4 chicken salads, shrimp, <BR>white cheese, and the list goes on. Avoid something with a logo that looks like a chain. The small independents are the best. <BR> <BR>I find this variety and sense of experimentation with food typical of Belgium. I have not found the same variety in France, Italy, Germany or <BR>the Netherlands. <BR> <BR>In my opinion, for a great sandwich, Brussels is the place to go. Order 'cressonettes' (watercress sprouts) on the sandwich as well. It adds green and eye appeal. <BR> <BR>Also consider matjes (young raw herring). They are good with diced onions. <BR> <BR>You just made me hungry. Enjoy your trip. <BR> <BR>Jerry <BR> <BR>

sandi Jul 26th, 2001 07:45 AM

Well, Brussell Sprouts, of course!!!


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