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What's near this location in Rutland, England?

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Nov 24th, 2003, 03:04 PM
  #21
 
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Susanbr /> The REAL surprising thing about Eyam is that it WASN'T decimated by plague (well technically yes in the pedantic meaning of the word - but not nearly as badly as should have happened).

When the villager realised the plague had been introduced into the village they held a meeting and decided to cut all ties with the outside world. Effectively they sealed themselves off... any food or trade was done by leaving goods at a marked point where neighbouring visitors could collect them from. And they lived like this for some considerable time - maybe 3 years or so, you'll have to search the internet for details - expecting to have signed their own death warrants, ie to all succumb over the months to the bubonic plague.
Oddly they didn't... some families singularly failed to catch the disease. In the end the plague died out in the village before the village died out of the plague.

Fast forward a few hundred years and global terrorism coupled with the threat of biological warfare and maybe some lunatic somewhere has plans to spread bubonic plague everywhere.

Academia remembers this odd little story about a Derbyshire village and suddenly you can't move down the village high street for researchers tracking down decendants of the original famillies, some still in the vilage and some now as far afield as Australia or the US. And what do they want? DNA samples.... maybe somewhere, mixed up in Eyam is the secret to genetic immunity from Bubonic Plague... and, the REAL Holy Grail, maybe a lot more besides.

This is an ongoing research project with real application to our times and has attracted considerable commercial and governmental backing.

Thyra's right - go to Eyam, I seem to remember there maybe a small museum and maybe books/pamphlets available in the village shop with an interesting notated history walk around the village.

(a quick draw of breath)

As for Nottingham Lace... there is a lace museum and Nottingham Lace centre close to Weekday Cross on the edge of The Lace Market (the traditional area of warehouses and factories where Lace was produced by hand - remember the Luddites originated in Nottingham when one Ned Ludd smashed up one of the new fangled lace making machines which was destroying the livlihood of hundreds of Nottingham Lace artisans) - anyway there's more info in the Lace Centre than you can shake a Lace Doily at. At more than enough to tempt your credit card out of your purse.

Dr D.
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Nov 25th, 2003, 03:07 AM
  #22
 
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Hi
Glad you liked the Newstead Abbey suggestion. Hope I am not being presumptuous but are you a reader? If so there's 2 cracking biographies of Byron out at the moment. One by Benita Eisler, one by Fiona McCarthy. They are both fascinating - and if you read them you will DEFINITELY want to go to Newstead!
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Nov 25th, 2003, 08:43 AM
  #23
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Wow, Dr. D, thanks for that great history lesson! I did do a google search on Eyam and got a site that gave the history of it, but it didn't include much more than what you covered. I appreciate it.

Morgana, yes, I am a big reader. We recently moved to a smaller house. Even though we got rid of ten tons of stuff, I told my husband I wouldn't get rid of my books! I put together bookcases covering a 24' wall to hold them all, and they didn't quite fit...
I may have to check out those books. Do you have an opinion on which is better? Thanks!
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Nov 25th, 2003, 11:00 PM
  #24
 
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Hi
The Byron books are both great but I think I would go for the Fiona MacCarthy one (Byron, Life and Legend). It's a bit of a doorstep but I am sure you will be hooked - and any trip to Newstead will be enhanced!
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Nov 26th, 2003, 08:18 AM
  #25
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Thanks, Morgana, I'll check it out.
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Feb 19th, 2004, 09:44 AM
  #26
 
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Topping for Sherriow and her Queniborough questions!

Dr D.
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Feb 19th, 2004, 10:05 AM
  #27
 
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The food at Hambleton Hall is terrific, and the location (with view) is hard to beat.
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Nov 27th, 2005, 10:38 AM
  #28
 
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I know this is an old post, but we will also be going to Barnesdale in May 2006. My question... the shakespere plays in Stamford mentioned, do not start until June. Is there any where else we could see one while we are in that area? We will also be in London for 4 days, so could catch one there. Suggestions?
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Nov 27th, 2005, 10:54 AM
  #29
 
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It has been a long time but I remember going to a couple of plays when I lived in Norwich. (The w in Norwich is silent by the way.)

The plays we saw were more late 1600s. They were quite good but not London level productions.
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Nov 27th, 2005, 11:21 AM
  #30
 
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It is a shame Tolethorpe does not start performances until June as it is a great venue.

You could try asking Stamford Theatre, they probably will not have any Shakespere on at that time, but they may know somewhere locally that does.
Below is the link-

http://www.stamfordartscentre.com/ph...e=about_us.htm

Not far away is Leicester which has a large theatre-

http://www.lhtheatre.co.uk/FLASH.html

Hope this is of some use.
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Nov 27th, 2005, 11:43 AM
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ttt
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Nov 27th, 2005, 07:15 PM
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travel52: depending on your actual dates in London - the season at the Globe starts in May so that would be my first choice for Shakespeare.

Also - the open air theatre in Regent's Park starts around the end of May and usually has a couple of Shakespeare plays running in rep.

Plus there are usually one or two Shakespeare plays running somewhere in London just about any time
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Nov 29th, 2005, 12:35 PM
  #33
 
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Thanks Janis. We will be in London May 3-6. What is the best way to book tickets at the Globe? In advance? Thanks for your expertise !
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Nov 29th, 2005, 01:12 PM
  #34
 
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I think the Globe's season starts on May 5 next year - usually starts around the first weekend in May.

Normally You wouldn't need to book much, if any ahead. But since your available window is so small before you leave London, I'd probably pre-book.

The Globe's website will have all the season/details, cast announcements, etc after the first of the year.

http://www.shakespeares-globe.org
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