What is a Council House?

Jun 27th, 2005, 01:33 PM
  #21  
 
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The council rents can in theory be the same as commercial rents: the council's have to analyse the costs of running the property, so it could come out much the same, but it is usually cheaper.

The income of the tenants is not assessed for rent purposes, the rent is set according to the property size/type/facilities only. Presumably your relatives used to receive some housing benefit, which is means tested but nothing to do with them being in a council house, and when their daughters started earning the means-tested benefit is naturally reduced as the income of the entire household is taken into account.
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Jun 27th, 2005, 02:57 PM
  #22  
 
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When Labour were last in government they built council housing in expensive residential areas, namely Hampstead, and Primrose Hill. This was absolutely disgusting, and utterly Labour.

Prime residential area should never have had these monstrosities, and their inhabitants inflicted upon them. Utter madness, disgusting!
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Jun 27th, 2005, 04:32 PM
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I talked to DH's aunt this morning, and she said it was the amount of rent that was increased/decreased based on income, and they don't receive any other benefits. This is in N. Ireland, which often has its own quirky way of doing things differently than the rest of the UK.
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Jun 28th, 2005, 12:44 PM
  #24  
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m_kingdom2,
were some of these home on adelaide road in Primrose hill? If so they stood out. they had green signs descriping the complex.
yeadonite is offline  
Jun 28th, 2005, 04:53 PM
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Precisely. Most of that area - Swiss Cottage - is council. Interestingly enough, they're in the process of building a luxe block of flats in the middle of all of this, with prices up to 5m for a penthouse. Some mad person will have to buy it I suppose.
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Jun 28th, 2005, 05:04 PM
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I lived in Council accommodation until the age of 18 and at no time did my parents receive any kind of benefit.

Once you live in a rented house of any kind it’s hard to save enough money for a down payment on a house, especially once you start a family.

They actually bought their first house at the same time as DH and myself bought ours, now my mother lives in an Ex-council house. Most of her neighbors own their own homes and what was once a ‘dodgy’ neighborhood is now sought after – go figure!
alya is online now  
Jun 28th, 2005, 05:50 PM
  #27  
machin
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I think it means, like our mixed housing, where so many are allowed that are in a certain low income. The rest rent like anywhere.
 
Jun 28th, 2005, 06:09 PM
  #28  
 
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Machin

I don't really know what the term 'mixed housing' means, all I know is that I understood Gardyloo's first post and what he was saying to US posters.

From experience I would say that Barbara also sums it up very well.

Flanneruk, so true about the doors - but wasn't that a time and a place, and now they are all white vinyl


alya is online now  
Jun 28th, 2005, 06:13 PM
  #29  
 
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Council Houses do indeed equate to projects and, on the whole, are blue-collar residences. Your typical council house dweller will use far more services than they pay for (often they pay nothing) and, as such, they treat what they've been given accordingly.
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Jun 28th, 2005, 06:50 PM
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stellarosa

I would assume - from personal experience - that you are talking innercity and highrise. Thankfully I was raised in a small estate of 90 flat/apartments with 9 flats per block (our flat/apartment had 2 floors) and out of town.

I remember in the early 70s walking carefully over the the communal area floors that were being cleaned by our neighbors - we all took it in turns.

However I think that the 60's/70's were the high point of council houses and I don't think that would happen now - my mother and her contempories took good care of our surroundings, My father planted outside the building even though we lived on the third floor
alya is online now  
Jun 28th, 2005, 06:59 PM
  #31  
 
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having re-read that I don't think I made myself clear.

Our flat had 2 floors, not the block, that had 4 floors (3 communal) - we went upstairs when we went to bed. Any clearer?
alya is online now  
Jun 28th, 2005, 07:42 PM
  #32  
 
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Yo Tony - lurking, are we?
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Jun 28th, 2005, 07:46 PM
  #33  
 
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gardyloo

explaination?
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Jun 28th, 2005, 08:53 PM
  #34  
 
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Stellarosa is Fodorite of yore who emerges from self-imposed posting exile now and then. If we're lucky one of these days he'll resume his former posting habits, which are missed.
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Jun 28th, 2005, 09:14 PM
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Paranoid? Moi? Only on a Tuesday

thanks for the explanation Gardyloo, I just wanted to make sure your post wasn't directed at me.

ttfn
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Jun 29th, 2005, 02:27 AM
  #36  
 
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Interesting to see how some of our UK posters view social housing; having been involved in the sector for the last 20 years or so, I have seen many changes, some forced, some not. The fact is that the right to buy legislation prevents councils from replacing the properties that are sold, so, not surprisingly, they find themselves left with all the "less nice" (shall we say) stock in hard to let areas. At the same time capital allocations from central government reduced substantially, leaving them with poorer stock and less money to spend. What a surprise that council housing is now in a parlous state.
Registered Social Landlords (housing associations) have grown to fill that gap, and now have some of the nicest housing around (in London anyway), usually on mixed tenure developments.
I bet that's either confused or upset most of you, but that is an insider's perspective.
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Jun 29th, 2005, 07:28 AM
  #37  
 
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Alya

I also speak from experience. Brought up in a very working-class area of Labour-loving Scotland and spent a dozen years working for a number of local authorities throughout the UK.

Council housing was a great post-war idea however, as we found out, when people are given things for nothing (or very little) they tend not to look after things particularly well.

However, I'd agree that it was different in the 1960's and 1970's but certainly, from the 80's onwards, the Utopian dream of council housing estates has sadly, for many, turned into a nightmare. The Housing Associations have claimed all the decent stuff and left the dross.

I think it came home to me one day when I was told that the roads construction crew I was supervising were refusing to enter an estate (Niddrie, Edinburgh) without a police escort.

Gardyloo, do I know you by another name?

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Jun 29th, 2005, 08:03 AM
  #38  
 
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Nice to hear from you Tony! Do stop by more often.
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Jun 29th, 2005, 08:58 AM
  #39  
 
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Hallo Barbara, I think I may.
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Jun 29th, 2005, 09:46 AM
  #40  
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thanks so much for the information. I did see many areas with signs that said estates, now I know why.

The price of real estate was so high, are the salaries higher than in the US?
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