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What can I expect to pay for "Un Cafe" in Paris?

What can I expect to pay for "Un Cafe" in Paris?

Sep 30th, 2000, 02:55 PM
  #1  
pdv28
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What can I expect to pay for "Un Cafe" in Paris?

Hi everyone. I have another question for you about cafes. I was just wondering today about how much, in general, can one expect to pay for a sit down cuppa joe in a cafe in Paris? I'm sure it will vary depending on how popular the cafe is?? Would you happen to know?

Will price differ whether you have a cafe au lait, vs espresso or whatever?

Thanks again!
Patricia
 
Sep 30th, 2000, 06:08 PM
  #2  
Donna
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Usually about 20F (price includes tax and tip). Sometimes more, sometimes less. Prices are lower standing up at the "bar" or counter than at a table.
 
Sep 30th, 2000, 09:55 PM
  #3  
pdv28
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Thanks Donna! Much appreciated!!

Patricia
 
Oct 2nd, 2000, 04:46 AM
  #4  
Bob
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This year we paid 35ff for coffee at a sidewalk table in a high rent area.
 
Oct 2nd, 2000, 07:12 AM
  #5  
Brian in Atlanta
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Patricia, if you're ever in doubt, it seemed that most cafes had a posted menu (price list) near the front door. It's divided in 2 columns - one for at a table and one for at the bar.
 
Oct 2nd, 2000, 05:59 PM
  #6  
btm
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Any softdrink, cafe, is 20F. I bought a Perrier at the grocery store 6F.

All cafe are like expresso. If you want light ask for cafe creme.
 
Oct 2nd, 2000, 08:01 PM
  #7  
Mellen
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I wouldn't fret over it. An expresso or "grande creme" in Paris is surely one of life's greatest pleasures just when you need a caffeine jolt and a rest. Why quibble over a dollar or two(or francs)? Just have a seat, order the beverage most appealing at the moment, and enjoy!
 
Oct 2nd, 2000, 08:40 PM
  #8  
pdv28
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To everyone--thanks for all your input. For the last commentor --
I believe you are reading more into my question than I implied....I am certainly not quibbling, only inquiring.

Thanks to all!
Sincerely,
Patricia
 
Oct 3rd, 2000, 07:34 AM
  #9  
more
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Re: cafe au lait vs. cafe creme, I assume the former is with milk and the latter is with cream, but do they also differ in terms of proportions? Is cafe au lait basically equal portions of coffee with hot milk, and cafe creme is coffee with just a little bit of cream?
 
Oct 3rd, 2000, 07:55 AM
  #10  
Myriam
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Café au lait and café crème is both coffee with milk, usually a large cup. If you want a small coffee with a little bit of milk, ask for "un petit crème".
 
Oct 3rd, 2000, 02:31 PM
  #11  
Christina
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Although one would think they are different by the names, in most cafes you will get the same thing whether you order a cafe creme or cafe au lait -- coffee with steamed milk. In some cafes, you will get the milk on the side in a little pot and can mix it yourself. Cafe creme seems to be the more popular name nowadays in cafes, rather than cafe au lait. I think that in *theory*, cafe au lait has more milk (it's mostly milk) than cafe creme, but in practice, as I said, I think you get the same thing which is maybe about half coffee, half milk. If the cafe doesn't give the milk to you on the side and you don't like a lot of milk, a "cafe noisette" has just a little milk added. Also, I think it's been pretty common in touristy/expensive areas to pay a little pay more than 20F for a coffee or other drink (beer, tea or mineral water), and prices may go up at night after a certain time (10 pm, as I recall) in some cafes. On the Champs-Elysees, I think 30-35F is pretty common. A grand cafe creme and petit cafe creme are the same drink just in two different size cups (as a double expresso or grand cafe noir is just twice as much). Finally, you can get okay coffee at fast food restaurants like McDonalds and Quick for around 5F; if you don't want to hang around a cafe terrace, it might be preferable as it's more like good strong American coffee than the real thick expresso; there is also a "discount" cafe chain called "Ah, Ca Ira" which is serve yourself by ordering at a counter and carrying it yourself(no waiters) but drinks are very cheap--about 5F there, also, for coffee. I think they have some desserts and stuff, also, and you get to sit in their outdoor table part for that price, which you can't do at a regular cafe if you pay cheaper standup bar prices. There is one just across the street to the west of place Bastille. It's sort of a halfway choice between a real cafe and a fastfood joint (leaning towards the fastfood joint part) but nicer than McDonalds which are too often claustrophobic and have few outdoor tables and lots of kids/teens.
 
Oct 3rd, 2000, 04:48 PM
  #12  
wes fowler
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Patricia,
Once you've mastered the intricacies of Parisian cafes and their coffees, head off for Vienna where you can indulge in a never-ending variety of coffees. Viennese coffee houses offer a real challenge for the caffeine connoisseur. Consider "Grosser Schwarzer" (large cup of black coffee), "Kleiner Schwarzer" (a small cup of the same), "Grosser Brauner" (large cup of coffee with a wee dram of milk), "Verlangerter Schwarzer" (black coffee weakened with water), "Einspanner" (black coffee served in a glass with whipped cream), "Fiaker (not the horse-drawn carriage but black coffee served in a glass with a shot of rum), "Franziskaner" (coffee mixed with pieces of chocolate), "Kaffee verkehrt" (reversed coffee with more milk than coffee), "Kaisermelange" (black coffee with [are you ready for this?] an egg yolk!), "Kapuziner" (black coffee with a small dollop of whipped cream and cocoa or grated chocolate), "Pharisaer" (coffee with rum, sugar and whipped cream) or any one of two dozen additional varied concoctions. Drink them in concert with a croissant (not a French pastry at all but one introduced to Vienna by the besieging Ottoman armies in the late 17th century then subsequently introduced into France).

One other bit of information. Be careful how you pronounce "beer" at a Parisian cafe if you feel the need for one instead of all that coffee. Order "beer" and you'll receive "byrrh" an aperitif type drink; order "bier" and you'll end up with a Kronenbourg, Paris' answer to Budwieser.


 

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