What Book to Read in France

Jun 16th, 2004, 08:35 PM
  #41  
 
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Underhill: What seeds? Did seeds come with the book? I've had it for years and years, and if indeed it came with seeds and I planted them, they are on someone else's property now!

Cigale: your spelling of both the title and the author name make it impossible for anyone to look it up - hence redgale's correction. It's not rude - it's practical. I'm sure Gerald would be horrified that someone who "KNEW" him misspelled his name.
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Jun 16th, 2004, 08:41 PM
  #42  
 
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If one Googles Laurence Durrell, it comes up as Laurence.
If one Googles him as Lawrence, it also comes up.
Gerald is always spelled the same.
Which one is it then? Does it matter?
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Jun 16th, 2004, 08:44 PM
  #43  
 
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StCirz,

My copy of "French Dirt" came with a packet of seeds stuck inside the front cover. I never got around to planting them--basil, I think.
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Jun 16th, 2004, 08:54 PM
  #44  
 
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WAAaaa! my French Dirt did not come with seeds~! And I bought it when it first was published.
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Jun 16th, 2004, 09:00 PM
  #45  
 
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St Cirq, I did not deliberately mispell Tegales name as you copied my typo. I have physical problems and am not going to spend my time on corrections when there are no edit options. Those who know me know that. Nor will I criticize anyone's over use of indeed.
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Jun 16th, 2004, 09:09 PM
  #46  
dln
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned Joanne Harris' two books, Chocolate, and Five Quarters of the Orange. The latter book takes place in a small town in post WWII France; the former was made into a popular movie with Ingrid Bergman's daughter (sorry, forgot her name; I'm sure one of you will know).

Years ago I read the bodice buster Mistral's Daughter but I don't know if it's still in print. Mimi, I know you've read it--who was the painter?
 
Jun 16th, 2004, 09:12 PM
  #47  
 
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dln, Isabelle Rossalini ~
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Jun 16th, 2004, 09:14 PM
  #48  
 
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sorry-IsabellA Rossallini
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Jun 16th, 2004, 09:17 PM
  #49  
 
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It was fiction but based on Picasso who did some of those nasty things. The hotel I stayed in for almost three weeks. is part of the action.
I didn't like the mini series they did on the book with Stephanie Powers, so miscast and Stacy Keach (ugh) the painter. If on a remake I can pcture Ben Kingsly (sp) playing the painter's role.
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Jun 16th, 2004, 09:19 PM
  #50  
dln
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Merci, you two lovers of all things French, Mimi and Scarlett!
 
Jun 16th, 2004, 09:45 PM
  #51  
 
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Ah, the Alexandia Quartet! You've just
brought on a bout of nostalgia! Justine
was my absolute fav. novel for years
and the mere mention of it brings back
a whiff of being 19 again #39;(

I'm suggesting Ina Caro's The Road from
the Past - I know, I know, it's non-
fiction and a travel guide but it's
so well-written and readable that I
think it would enhance any visit to
anywhere in France.

If anyone cares <) I'm in the anti-
DVC camp in a big way!
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Jun 16th, 2004, 09:56 PM
  #52  
 
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llamalady, did you see the awful film they made of Justine, of the Alexandia Quartet? I think it was Anouk Aimie who starred.
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Jun 16th, 2004, 11:59 PM
  #53  
 
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Henry James:
* The American
* A Little Tour in France

I was reading some short stories by Mavis Gallant (modern Canadian writer, output is probably mostly from the 50s and 60s) lately, some of which are set in Paris.
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Jun 17th, 2004, 01:45 AM
  #54  
 
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Maybe thrillers on the aftermath of war are not your thing (and maybe these are hard to get now), but two by Anthony Price are

Other Paths to Glory: set as a modern re-investigation of an event along the battle lines of WW1, which turns up some secrets people in modern times are heavily trying to keep quiet.

'44 Vintage: A 'pre-quel' in which the central characters of his books set in the present day have their first adventure together in the aftermath of D-Day
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Jun 17th, 2004, 03:10 AM
  #55  
 
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60 million Frenchmen can't be wrong.
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Jun 17th, 2004, 06:17 AM
  #56  
 
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Suzy Gershman who has written an awful lot of "borne to shop" books, wrote another entitled "C'est La Vie" about moving to Paris after she was widowed... I enjoyed that.
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Jun 17th, 2004, 06:51 AM
  #57  
 
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"Dear Theo"....Irving Stone
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Jun 17th, 2004, 07:06 AM
  #58  
 
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I just returned from 2 weeks in SW France. Just before going, I picked up a book in Barnes & Noble called "60 Million Frenchman Can't be Wrong (why we love france but not the french)" by a Canadian couple Nadeau and Barlow. Not fiction but a pretty good look at the "French Way". Even explained why they go on strike so often. This last was brought home to me when leaving CDG airport--my flight was delayed 3/4 hour because the crew that cleans the plane suddenly went on strike!

Viva the French!
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Jun 17th, 2004, 07:16 AM
  #59  
 
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Just printed up this great thread. NOW, if I can just tear myself away from Fodors (and my obsessive-compulsive "trip planning") and get back to the days of reading (before computers)! Some of these book titles bring back wonderful memories, especially The Alexandria Quartet (I loved those books SO long ago). I'm in the middle of reading "A Distant Mirror" a second time - fantastic!
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Jun 17th, 2004, 07:17 AM
  #60  
 
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Margo's suggestion of "The French Way" was hilarious. My daughter Honore' and I had a lot of fun with that one. Thanks for that!
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