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What are your favorite cheeses in France and Netherlands?

What are your favorite cheeses in France and Netherlands?

May 25th, 2004, 07:51 AM
  #41  
 
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Siobhan, Epoisse reminds me of a young friend of mine, a musician who lives nea Versailles. I have never met anyone so crazy over one cheese. He's always nibbling on it. He also has the same passion for Genepi(an herbal drink) and makes his own, that'll knock your sox off!
cigalechanta is offline  
Jun 6th, 2004, 04:21 PM
  #42  
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ttt
ilovetulips is offline  
Jun 6th, 2004, 04:28 PM
  #43  
 
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I think for me, is the Banon, wrapped in chestnut leaves that were soaked in eau de vie. It does not taste the same here, as you who love brie and camberbet get to finally taste it art its source will notice.
cigalechanta is offline  
Aug 3rd, 2004, 05:00 AM
  #44  
 
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Okay, back at the market in Paris this summer and tried the same Cardinal cheese I was trying to find out about on this board. This time wrote down the full name:

Cardinal Cheese but in parentheses: "Nivernais demi sec"

sherry1 is offline  
Aug 3rd, 2004, 06:07 AM
  #45  
 
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Great tips, yes enjoy the FR cheeses there but don't try to bring 'em back. Remember that cheese shop owners will ripen those little guys themselves, in the optimal conditions, & sell/serve them at their peak . . . and let's just say that a transatlantic flight is not an optimal condition . . .

Only once did I try to bring something back to Ealing via Eurostar, and that's less than 5 hours door-to-door. The entire coach was *whifffy.* It smelled like something died! Never again.

So just don't do desserts, save yourself for the cheese course at lunch & dinner.

Now, NL kaas is another thing. They're easy to lump into a suitcase, and they travel well (even longhaul).

The boerenkaas (farmer's cheese) can be wonderfully tart. I have brought back a baby round (they look like little cannonballs) of edam or gouda, when I know friends will be entertaining & be able to use it. Mosterdkaas actually has little mustard seeds in the cheese, this is excellent for snackies with beer. But my favorite is nagelkaas (literally, 'nail' cheese), with whole cloves in it. No you don't eat the cloves but what a wonderful taste!! Could have some with my breakfast right now!!! (The best types of nagelkaas come from Friesland.)

Just ask for en klein stukje, a little bit to taste. Cheesemongers will also wrap your triangles up for you, first in paper then plastic.
HTH

ps - click on #3
http://www.ryc.be/nl/products/kaas/holland/nl_kaas.htm
ealing_calling is offline  
Aug 3rd, 2004, 07:21 AM
  #46  
 
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Epoisses? In the US??? Where oh where is a cheesemaker producing them? Got a website? I can't seem to find them. I made a big point of eating them in France because we can't get them here, unpasteurized milk and whatnot...
But that said, that's my favorite while in France. I can find everything else.
SuzieC is offline  
Aug 3rd, 2004, 09:41 AM
  #47  
 
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Here's my funny from the weekend:
I was standing in line at a deli with my friend from Japan. She was perusing the menu and the items that could be included in her sandwich. She said, "What is this--'American cheese?'" I turned to her with a sad face and sighed, "Crap."

(I hope I don't offend anyone with my funny!)
MelissaHI is offline  
Aug 3rd, 2004, 11:59 AM
  #48  
 
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SuzieC, you can get epoisses in the US. My local cheese shop carries it. I don't know how they manage to get it into the country, but there must be a distributor who does it. Keep looking and good luck.
shellio is offline  
Aug 4th, 2004, 06:47 PM
  #49  
 
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Reader- I am making my way through the cheese counter of my local Spanish/Portugues market. Over the weekend we served a soft, tangy white cheese over warm apples and berries. My current favorite tho is called queijo mussarela. It comes in a braided round, mild but flavorful, like a good provolone.
ninasdream is offline  
Aug 4th, 2004, 07:01 PM
  #50  
 
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SuzieC, if you can't get it locally, go to igourmet.com and order it there. Let us know how you make out. Good luck.
mvor is offline  
Aug 4th, 2004, 09:08 PM
  #51  
 
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There are just too many but I really enjoy an well aged quality gouda. There are several great shops in Amsterdam with great window displays. Ask them to provide you with a taste of the very very best goudas, select and justify the premium price with a smaller quantity.
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Aug 4th, 2004, 10:09 PM
  #52  
 
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I just want to officially post my protest of the omission of Belgium in this thread's title. It's as though the cows skipped over Belgium and went straight to France from the Netherlands. Harummph!

Chimay, without or without the beer added, is truly a delectable cheese.

usbeauty is offline  
Aug 4th, 2004, 11:19 PM
  #53  
 
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Now that is interesting - I drink the product frequently and particularly the Blue lable. Is the cheese a blue mould, washed rhind or....? We will also be in Bruges soon to walk the paths of the ancestors.
SydneySteve is offline  
Aug 4th, 2004, 11:32 PM
  #54  
 
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Hi Steve,
It's a yellowish, soft, sharp thing ;-
usbeauty is offline  
Aug 5th, 2004, 04:44 AM
  #55  
 
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LOL, Mvor ... yes I found it...!
Also, one of my other favorite sites
epicurious.com has a "cheese shop"...

AmexCard already got a "hit"...a got a blue, the epoisse and a calabres (Spanish spelling, not my best AT ALL!)
YUMMMMY... now for the good wines!
SuzieC is offline  
Aug 5th, 2004, 04:48 AM
  #56  
 
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When we visit Belgium in September I will definately follow up on the cheese. While we will not get down as far south as to where Chimay is produced, we will seek out the cheese variety. I will put a note in my book.
SydneySteve is offline  
Aug 5th, 2004, 06:06 AM
  #57  
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Sorry for not including Belgium. I guess I didn't know that they were known for cheeses. I definately want to try some chocolate there. Thanks for the tips.
ilovetulips is offline  
Aug 5th, 2004, 06:45 AM
  #58  
 
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Epoisse!
Besides chimoy, what other Belguim cheese, do you suggest? Do they make a goat cheese?
tondalaya is offline  
Aug 5th, 2004, 06:50 AM
  #59  
 
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OK you époisses freaks, check this

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/tr...073cheese.html

I would still say relax, don't do it. Bacteria! Cheese mites! Sounds like cheesemongers here somehow manage to import it Stateside . . .
ealing_calling is offline  
Aug 5th, 2004, 07:50 AM
  #60  
 
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SuzieC, thanks for the epicurious link, my husband, the cook, will love it. Here's a great link that shows what to drink w/your cheese:

http://www.frenchcheese.dk/gb/fixed/index1024.html

Sherry1, this is pure conjecture but I'm guessing that your cheese may be named for Cardinal Mazarin who bought the title to the duchy of Nivernais. The link above shows two cheeses produced in this region (Dornecy and Lormes) but, alas, no Cardinal.

Hopefully someone will ask their "cheese guy" and we can get to the bottom of this for you. Meanwhile, I'm off to have some aged Gouda, yum!

Maureen
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