What are the must try French food?

Aug 9th, 2009, 06:08 AM
  #21  
 
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I think annhig and JeremyinFrance offer good advice.

Rather than trying to remember all this stuff (though I really like Cathies list), go to a local neighborhood restaurant or a brasserie and order from the "menu" or "plats". What we call a "menu" is called a "carte" in France, and "menu" means a multicourse daily "special" and a "plat" is like a "special". You will be eating the food designed to appeal to local eaters, hence pretty French.

Don't worry about it being too much food, because the servings will be smaller than in the US. Consider eating your big meal at lunch, when it is likely to be less expensive and more typical of what people eat. Then have a sandwich or salad in a cafe for supper, or get one a emporter (takeout_) at a cafe or supermarket or traiteur (deli).

It is best if you are with another person because you can share and get to taste more things, though the French wouldn't generally do it.

I agree with JulieVikmanis on tripe and andouillete. I am not prejudiced against organ meats and will pack away the boudin noir, museau, and rognons with the best of them, but after repeated attempts, I find that I just don't like tripe and andouillette. So it goes.
Ackislander is offline  
Aug 9th, 2009, 06:14 AM
  #22  
 
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I too am slightly taken aback that you have never had French food. Does that simply mean this is your first time to France? Or you have never even had French cooking at home, at local restaurants where you live? Am curious to know a bit of your back ground.
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Aug 9th, 2009, 06:18 AM
  #23  
 
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JulieV that was kind of you to list/translate all those foods.
I cook and have hundreds of cookbooks but still there are some foods that I've come across reading Fodor posts or "googling" Paris restaurants that I was not familiar with. I will copy this and put it with my restaurant list for our up coming trip. Thanks!
decee is offline  
Aug 9th, 2009, 06:19 AM
  #24  
 
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I highly recommend that the OP get a French food glossary. You can go to Patricia Wells' site and download one. Many/most restaurants will have the menu in English, but should it not be, a regular dictionary will not suffice for translating food terms.
I do love all the suggestions, and think I will save the lists for my own amusement and possible cooking. Such good stuff.
Gretchen is offline  
Aug 9th, 2009, 06:21 AM
  #25  
 
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Coquilles Saint Jacques..this dish is very popular in Provence and South France.

Ratatouilles, Salad Nicoise,Pissaladiere, bouillabaise, etc.., you will find that the most tastiest and fresh food are in South France..
kismetchimera is offline  
Aug 9th, 2009, 06:27 AM
  #26  
 
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> Ratatouilles, Salad Nicoise,Pissaladiere, bouillabaise, etc.., you will find that the most tastiest and fresh food are in South France..

OP will be in Paris for 1 weeks but I guess there are restaurants that serve good South of France specialities...
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Aug 9th, 2009, 08:52 PM
  #27  
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Thanks everyone for their feedbacks expecially JulieVikmanis for the detailed descriptons of the French food, this will definitely help me in the future.

I agree with Gretchen that I should probably get a French food glossary to help me get familiar with the food. Wouldn't want to order something at the restaurant without knowing what I ordered.

I guess I've had some of the French desserts and bakeries before, so my questions was mainly for the main dishes.

Yes, this is my first time to France and I've actually never been to a French cuisine restaurant before so I'm not very familiar with the food.
xsandiax is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 04:09 AM
  #28  
 
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I'm an American living in the French Alps, Savoie region. I've been experimenting with the local food and even putting some recipe videos on my blog for those who don't know the local cuisine. I don't know if you'll find these in Paris, but I recommend the Savoie fondue, definitely Beaufort cheese, and the Tartiflette. Of course, there's the Fondant Chocolate and Creme Brulee too. The Savoie red Mondeuse wine is an interesting wine - very peppery. Good luck. Cynthia, an American in France
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Aug 10th, 2009, 04:18 AM
  #29  
 
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stfc,
I have a alarm bell that goes off in my head when I go near a tourist restaurant area and can only remember a couple of bad meals in five years of living in France.
JeremyinFrance is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 04:56 AM
  #30  
 
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Horse meat. Not every restaurant has it, but it is available.
Paul1950 is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 05:16 AM
  #31  
 
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Ira or anyone who enjoys the 6thA too,
what do you think of La Rontonde? have you tried C'est Mon Plaisar in the 15th?
FrankS is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 05:43 AM
  #32  
 
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If a restaurant has a terrine, I have it. It's like a meat pate that is served as an appetiser.

I like the bread over there, yum. For lunch I will often have a sandwich mixte, which is ham and cheese on a baguette, yum. Restaurants often state that their bread is Poilane.

Croque monsieur, another lunch favorite.

Patisseries...your friend. You will see creations and works of art at a lot of these locations, it is not twinkies in a wrapper.

Ice cream...there is a controversy here over whether Berthillon or Amorino is best. Another travel project.
Michel_Paris is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 05:51 AM
  #33  
 
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Lots of lists, all useful in their way, but perhaps confusing and a bit too much for someone who has not experienced French cuisine.

Why not go to a French restaurant where you live and try some of the dishes before you head to France?
laverendrye is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 05:51 AM
  #34  
 
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To answer the question, I think there ares regional for what not to miss. Pour Moi
In Brittany or Normany- Mussels
In the South bouillabaisse
In Loire the Licorice Rabbit

But Paris really has the best of everything(it just will often cost you more)
FrankS is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 06:26 AM
  #35  
 
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"Their version of "steak" so you know how much better ours is in the US (just my opinion of course)"

rofl. American steak is overcooked, tasteless and tough. Now if you are talking about Argentinian beef or better still Kobe beef....
Vientianeboy is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 06:43 AM
  #36  
ira
 
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VB says,
>American steak is overcooked, tasteless and tough.<

May I suggest that one shouldn't order steak at a seafood house in Annapolis?

ira is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 06:45 AM
  #37  
ira
 
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Sorry, FS. I have no info on La Rotonde.

ira is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 07:00 AM
  #38  
 
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Patisseries and omelettes.

In Paris, I was so hungry for fruit salad so I ordered one. It came with sorbet that was so tart I couldn't eat it, figs and fruits I don't know plus a few I recognized.

So when you think you are ordering something you are familiar with, that may not be true. But then this is why we travel to learn about other countries - their food, people and customs.
bratsandbeer is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 09:12 AM
  #39  
 
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Jeremy - my case rests!
stfc is offline  
Aug 10th, 2009, 09:21 AM
  #40  
 
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Rotonde de la Muette in the 16th?
Michel_Paris is offline  

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