What American foods do Europeans love?

Old Feb 10th, 2012, 12:33 PM
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"I've heard there are American families who eat fast food every night."

I am aure there are. But then I have heard that English actually like Marmite, the Germans have beer for breakfast, and the French wear the same clothes for weeeks at a time.
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Old Feb 10th, 2012, 02:17 PM
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It's so funny to just now come across this thread; I just bought a bottle of NY maple syrup 30 minutes ago to take to someone in Iceland (on the recommendation of a colleague). I actually wondered if it would be too sweet for non-American taste buds, but oh well, it's the thought that counts, right? Leaving tomorrow with a bottle of maple syrup in my suitcase...
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Old Feb 13th, 2012, 09:28 PM
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Chicken wings are mostly loved by Europeans
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Old Feb 13th, 2012, 09:51 PM
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And they entered Europe through Chinese and African immigrants. The American version arrived considerably later.
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Old Mar 19th, 2014, 08:16 AM
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@Chartley

"Waitrose, an upmarket U.K. grocery store. Their price is £1.67 per 100g.

The Walmart bottle is $7.48 per 12.5 oz."

Neither of those prices you mentioned in both the UK and US were for maple syrup - even though they may be "listed" as that. its mostly corn syrup in both cases.

Even grade B syrup is twice the price you listed. That weight of pure syrup in the states averages $20 USD.
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Old May 8th, 2014, 03:11 PM
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I'm American born and raised in California. I'm going to Germany in October to meet my great Aunt for the first time. I was looking for ideas as to send as gifts that she may like that can't be found in Germany. I was reading all of these posts and I have to say it's very interesting what people from other lands think about our food.

Americans do not eat fast food every day for every meal and not all of our food is loaded with additives and corn syrup. Do we love our fast food and junk food (cookies, cereals, soda) Speaking for myself, yeah I love those things but there is so much more to our cuisine. Just in California alone you can experience some of the best Mexican food (Mexico is our neighbor), BBQ, fresh seafood, and if you are a serious heath nut....well then California is definitely the place for you. Tons of vegan and vegetarian restaurants, organic grocery stores and restaurants.80% of the produce in the US comes from central California. Fresh and healthy is a huge deal in Cali. Every part of the US has their specialty I guess you could say. You want a deep dish pizza Chicago is the place, you want the best lobster then you need to go to Maine, you want it greasy and fried any where in the South will do.

We aren't all fat pigs over here. If you ever come to the US ask a local for a recommendation. You might just be pleasantly surprised.
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Old May 8th, 2014, 04:39 PM
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And if you'd read the dates you'd find people had given it up two years ago. Not that there won't be something similar next month.
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Old Jul 1st, 2014, 06:01 PM
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i still can't believe peanut butter pretzels
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Old Feb 23rd, 2015, 07:07 AM
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peanut butter pretzels are really loved here in Sweden, added with maple syrup
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Old Feb 23rd, 2015, 07:44 AM
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That is because people stopped eating two years ago.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2015, 11:16 AM
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Necro post.
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Old Feb 23rd, 2015, 11:51 AM
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Greasy spoon breakfasts including that perfect combo of sweet and salty
Breakfast served after the bars close
Pecan caramel rolls
Chocolate malts
Bagels
Beautiful steaks
Unusual salads served as a meal
Chipotle
Real Maple syrup in large bottles like they sell at Trader Joes
The incredible choice of breakfast cereals
Bloody Mary's
Sunday Brunch with made to order omelettes
Key Lime Pie
Real Mexican or Tex Mex
Cereal choices galore-Puffins, Barbara's Oat Squares, Quaker Instant Oatmeal packets
Coffee topped off at your table
Ice cubes in all cold beverages!
Jamba Juice
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Old Feb 25th, 2015, 12:08 AM
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There are two answers to this question. What foods which can only be found in the USA are available in Europe, and what American food do Europeans like when they go to the USA?

Looking at our cupboards at home (my wife is American and I am English), there are only two items which only come from the USA, namely maple syrup (though most of this is imported from Canada) and Grape Nuts. There are of course foods which one associates with the USA, but which now come from many countries, for example peanuts (and peanut butter), and corn. We generally have corn on the cob with our steaks. When we go to the USA, we find the food very similar, the main difference is the way the food is cooked or prepared. Chicken is chicken.There are, of course foods which are only found in the US, my wife's parents lived in Virginia, and her grandmother in Alabama,where they ate such things as hominy grits (Ugh), catfish and collard greens. Seafood is often different from that found in the UK, no clams or abalone, and there are many different varieties of fish.
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Old Feb 25th, 2015, 04:31 AM
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I love hominy grits. Think of it as pale polenta.
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Old Feb 25th, 2015, 05:16 AM
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This is a HILARIOUS post to read through. Never in my life would I have guessed maple syrup would be regarded as such a valued secret currency in the treat world. (Will Ferrell's elf, anyone?). We housed a German exchange student for a year, and she became addicted to Cheetos. She also gained about 20-pounds during her stay with us, but I pass no judgment...I too am a shameless cheeto bandito. I wish the U.S. didn't load everything in the grocery store with corn syrup and additives, but when you've grown up on it, it's tough to get away from. Excited to see what things I fall in love with food-wise on my trip to Europe!
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Old Feb 25th, 2015, 04:53 PM
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Siren6214, try Sticky Toffee Pudding.
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Old Feb 25th, 2015, 05:46 PM
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Not to pile on - but we have colleagues from europe visit our office fairly frequently. And the only foods 2 people have asked for (me to bring from a supermarket since they are staying in a hotel in midtown) is real maple syrup. Apparently most of that in europe is the fake stuff - 2% maple syrup in a large bottle of sugar water.

No one has ever asked for any other specific foods - except real bagels while they are actually in NYC.
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Old Feb 26th, 2015, 02:25 AM
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I didn't know there was so much difference. My locally bought pot of maple syrup (in Belgium) says 100% pure Canadian Maple syrup from organic agriculture grade C, Terrasana brand. Is that any good? Unless there's a huge difference in taste, I wouldn't want to pack maple syrup in my suitcase.
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Old Feb 26th, 2015, 07:29 AM
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Grade A is the finest (and mildest) and grade B is the most common.
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Old Feb 26th, 2015, 08:57 AM
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Look for pure Vermont Maple Syrup, categorized by quality,a letter grade. I am lucky to feceive Cat A as a gift every year.
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