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Warm weather in France - you bet! Now what?

Warm weather in France - you bet! Now what?

Jun 2nd, 2011, 12:07 AM
  #1  
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Warm weather in France - you bet! Now what?

Anyone who has been to France in the last two months will have noticed they had great weather. The Meteo has now confirmed that April and May were the warmest since 1900. And the driest in 50 years. The water table is very low and much of France is now officially suffering from drought.

Now that we're into June the temperature has dropped considerably the last few days, and we've had clouds - but virtually no rain still in the Dordogne. This month is considered to be critical in terms of what happens to crops, which obviously are suffering.

The immediately obvious result in the Dordogne,where I live, apart from normally green areas turning brown, is that the river is VERY low. There just isn't very much water coming down, especially since it was quite a dry winter. It's hard to believe that there will be much canoeing during the summer - the level already looks like mid-August.

So if those of you coming in the next month or two receive some rain, try not to complain too much.
Carlux is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 12:59 AM
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That is a terrible situation and it is about the same in Burgundy. We had a rainy day 2 days ago and I even took photos to put on my FB page. Still a bit grey today with warmer temperatures but no more rain I'm afraid... At least it makes happy guests!
cocofromdijon is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 03:00 AM
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The warmest weather since 1900 and a near-total lack of rain do not make for "great weather," quite the contrary. I don't understand why so many people think hot and dry equate to "beautiful" weather. Go live in the desert for a while and you may feel differently.

In any case, it's getting hotter everywhere (but especially in Europe), so enjoy cool weather, snow, and rain while you can.
AnthonyGA is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 03:17 AM
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Will start the rain dance now. We want the Dordongne green and healthy.
Italyagain is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 05:41 AM
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Thanks for the update, Carlux, I'd been wondering about this just this morning. We're heading to your neighborhood the first two weeks of July.

I grew up in California, and I hate the thought of drought. I hope things improve soon.
pavot is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 05:53 AM
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I hate to ask this -- since it smacks of insensitivity -- but if water restrictions are in place ... are people allowed to fill their swimming pools?
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Jun 2nd, 2011, 06:41 AM
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'I don't understand why so many people think hot and dry equate to "beautiful" weather.'

I agree - although having spent a month in Australia not far from the flooded areas, I can attest to how quickly one can tire of torrential rainfall.

In fact I am surprised every night when the weather forecaster talks about 'good weather' and sun coming back. Normally there are news items about how bad the drought is, and then the forecast has virtually no recognition of the fact that we need rain. Last night was the first night anyone mentioned how lucky it was that in the next few days most of France would get badly needed rain.

Regarding pools, it depends where you are. There are various restrictions. The following map shows know the regions where restrictions are in force - the most strict shown in red.
http://www.developpement-durable.gou..._eau_01_06.pdf

Most pools would already be filled and in use for weeks, what with the hot weather, but owners may not be able to fill them.
Carlux is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 09:03 AM
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Carlux
What do the water restrictions mean for the normal tourist? Are hotels, gites, or B&Bs going to limit the amount of water their guests can use?

Stu Dudley
StuDudley is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 09:29 AM
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Stu I don't think hotels etc are concerned about that. Here is some info here : http://www.dossierfamilial.com/restr...erne-5484.html
cocofromdijon is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 10:05 AM
  #10  
sap
 
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I feel guilty about this, but I'm dreading seeing rain in the forecast for France. We have had a cold, gloomy spring here in California (well, cold for us, as the solar hasn't even been able to warm up our pool yet) and I was so-o-o looking forward to the unusually sunny weather in Paris and beyond. Looks like rain is in the forecast soon for you, though! I guess I'll be bringing the clouds with me. So much for picnics and walking tours. I guess we'll be enjoying a lot more time indoors in our apartments & gites instead. After 18 months of planning, it looks like I should have picked May instead of June.

All that selfishness during my vacation aside, though, I do sympathize with your drought situation as it is ever a problem here, too.
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Jun 2nd, 2011, 11:53 AM
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We have had so much rain here in upstate New York, after a winter of much snow, that we are starting to resemble a rain forest. My garden is out of control already and there are mushrooms under the roses.
I am waving my rainstick now to send it to France as we arrive there June 24th and I really want to canoe the Vezere and Dordogne, not walk them!
Italyagain is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 01:09 PM
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Paris is lucky to be sitting on a huge water table, so anybody planning to visit just Paris probably doesn't have to worry about anything.

But we Parisians are still worrying, because this can't go on indefinitely. The vegetation is already looking like late July, so some of the trees will begin yellowing soon.
kerouac is online now  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 01:17 PM
  #13  
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'What do the water restrictions mean for the normal tourist? Are hotels, gites, or B&Bs going to limit the amount of water their guests can use?'

For those who can't read Coco's reference in French:
http://www.dossierfamilial.com/restr...erne-5484.html

The prefect of each department has the right to levy restrictions, depending on individual circumstances. Even within the department some areas may be more severely affected than others.

Then there are various levels of severity. At some point people will be forbidden to fill pools, and if the situation becomes more severe, forbidden to fill existing pools, wash cars, water gardens, etc.

But for the normal tourist you shouldn't face restrictions in hotels, etc. You'll just see a lot of brown grass and low rivers. But please don't leave the water running while you brush your teeth!

(While we were in Australia in January, staying in a house exchange, we actually had to contact the owners to see if their pool had ever overflowed, it was raining so hard. Turns out there are overflow pipes on pools, but it really seemed likely that this one could - we were actually out in the garden trying to decide whether it would reach the neighbours first, or us. It didn't but then the veranda 'sail' blew off in the high winds and rain!)
Carlux is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 01:39 PM
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Thanks for the translation Carlux and sorry for the French link I thought everyone used something like http://translate.google.fr/#fr|en| to translate a page.
cocofromdijon is offline  
Jun 2nd, 2011, 10:29 PM
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My experience with computer translation into English is that it's often easier to read the French!

This one isn't bad, but it still has clunkers like:
There are four levels: the level of vigilance, the alert threshold, the alert threshold and increased the seizure threshold.
Carlux is offline  
Jun 3rd, 2011, 12:58 AM
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Better than nothing when you can't understand a word. I used it to translate some Chinese websites and I found it quite accurate (at least I could get a global meaning) Tripadvisor uses it too to translate reviews.
cocofromdijon is offline  
Jun 3rd, 2011, 06:16 AM
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I live in Florida and we are in a drought and the fire danger is very scary. I know tourist want hot sunny days for the beach and hate hearing them complain if we get a small shower. We need rain! I hope you get your much needed rain.
flpab is offline  
Jun 3rd, 2011, 06:47 AM
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Carlux, contrary to your experience, here on the west coast of Australia we had yet another record-breaking dry spell and this trend, which seems to be world wide, is ver alarming.

Having endured a very long hot ssummer, now that cooler weather has finally arrived, I'm about to set off for more hot dry weather in France. Now this will be interesting because usually whenever I travel to places for the scenery (as opposed to big city museums galleries, shopping etc where weather isn't such a factor) it manages to rain. So although i can't make it rain here, maybe I'll be able to do it for you.

Not sure why I thought it would be a good idea to miss Perth's all too brief winter - not a fan of hot,hot hot.
Like others above, it irritates to hear weather men and radio announcers raving about "yet another lovely hot day" when rain is so desperately needed.
eigasuki is offline  
Jun 3rd, 2011, 07:31 AM
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Hi Carlux, I would assume the Vezere is in the same situation as the Dordogne River...is that correct?
wren is offline  
Jun 3rd, 2011, 07:31 AM
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We do need rain although just had a good soak over the past three days. A help but it won't erase the very dry winter and hot and dry April and May.

I love hot, dry weather which is why I moved here but not at the expense of the farmers. It isn't supposed to be like this until July and August when it's expected.

My department is in the second highest restriction zone but difficult to find exactly what restrictions the prefecture has put in place. The newspapers aren't clear other than to say the prefecture would communicate the specifics. Maybe I missed them.

Lacking specifics, we are being prudent, watering sparingly. We have mostly drought-resistant plants and no lawn so mainly focusing on two new trees we planted in March.

I hope conditions improve worldwide, some areas expect yields down 50% from last year.
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