UK Cuisine Q?- SPAM Fritters?

Mar 12th, 2007, 06:19 AM
  #41  
 
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Oh Maria, yes, Vesta meals were also my introduction to exotic food ! Only my Mum and I ate them though - my Dad & brother wouldn't eat "that foreign muck"

I recently came across a recipe for chilli con carne I used to cook regularly as a student - it would have been my next step into exotic cooking after Vestas. It involved mince, a small tin of tomatoes, a small tin of sweetcorn, a small tin of kidney beans - and a tin of baked beans !! Wondering if I ought to try it again for old times' sake

David, I'd forgotten all about frozen concentrated OJ ! Why ???

I always preferred Instant Whip to Angel Delight - butterscotch flavour was my favourite.
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 06:31 AM
  #42  
 
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My mother was quite adept at her version of "foreign" food. My father was Czech and she spent 18 months over there just after the war. We were brought up on Mum's stews - a cross between goulash and Lancashire hotpot, complete with dumplings and her version of spaghetti bolognese made with the remains of the Sunday roast beef. At least we never minded trying anything new.
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 06:50 AM
  #43  
 
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Sounds quite nice, Maria !
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 06:59 AM
  #44  
 
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These recipe cards from the 70s remind us how far we've come. Even if there are people who want to inflict tined cheese on harmless B&B owners.....

http://www.candyboots.com/wwcards.html
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 07:09 AM
  #45  
 
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They do look delicious

I think I'll stick with my mother's steak and cowheel - though perhaps not the tripe and elder (served cold with salt, pepper and vinegar) popular with her for Saturday tea.
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 07:21 AM
  #46  
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And in the States SPAM was also a staple for families in the 50s, when as a kid i was served this quick and then perceived as healthy even stuff which was it seems often smothered in baked beans.

Or fried as what i gather SPAM fritters in UK must be.

www.spam.com is the Hormel company's home page about SPAM. Unfortunately my computer currently won't let me on it. I had hoped to see where the word SPAM is dervied from - an abbreviation?

Also were they first popularized in WWII and a staple in army rations?

Anyway a fascinating, to me, discussion of out of fashion British foods!
PalenQ is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 07:27 AM
  #47  
 
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I had hoped to see where the word SPAM is dervied from - an abbreviation?>>>>>

I believe its a contraction of spiced pork and ham.

It became popular over here as it was shipped in during the war and we had rationing - so it was a luxury.

People of my parent's age still regard it fondly. My dad used to love it.
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 07:50 AM
  #48  
 
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Even if there are people who want to inflict tinned cheese on harmless B&B owners.....

You could make a comedy sketch of it.
The landlady could have been played by the late Les Dawson.

"Waal, ma'am, ah'll jest mosey into your quaint little kitchen and fix you a red-hot tinned cheese and tomayto delicacy from back home"

Yes, Miss P, I do remember that school bog paper.
As I remember, it didn't so much wipe as redistribute
Josser is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 09:18 AM
  #49  
 
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Right, children

I have found a recipe for spam fritters
http://tinyurl.com/yw2njb

As well as the standard recipe, it also has Mustardy SPAM fritters with tomato salsa. That might appeal to our Texan friend and his long-suffering landlady
MissPrism is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 09:31 AM
  #50  
 
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Just think of the dinner parties we could have, MissPrism

For anyone who likes a bit more spice, you could try this

http://www.spam-uk.com/info/blackpepper.asp
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 09:34 AM
  #51  
 
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You can even get your spam fritters ready made:

http://www.spam-uk.com/default.asp
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 09:45 AM
  #52  
 
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Spam goes haute cuisine - spam with stinky french garlic:


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main...04/nspam04.xml


audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 09:48 AM
  #53  
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gourmet SPAM? Oxymoron?
PalenQ is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 10:15 AM
  #54  
 
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Fantastic, MissPrism ! "the 'SPAM COOKBOOK' by Marguerite Patten", eh ? Bet she's not too keen on being reminded of that highlight of her career (if she's still with us ?).
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 10:17 AM
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The septics have found another use for the vile stuff:

http://www.planetshwoop.com/spam/intro.html
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 10:34 AM
  #56  
 
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The Spam Cookbook was first published in 2000. It wasn't a reprint of a wartime publication.

Ms Patten still pops up on the odd culinary reminiscence show.
flanneruk is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 10:57 AM
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Blimey !
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 11:27 AM
  #58  
 
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Well, I say that. The Spam Cookbook came out of Spam's modern - well whatever Spam has going for it these days.

Ms Patten was what we'd now call a home economist, working for Lord Woolton at the Ministry of Food during the war: she'd have been in her early 20s at the outbreak. The Ministry published lots of wartime recipe leaflets, and there are suggestions for things to do with Spam in some we've got. But nothing they did was ever formally attributed to her - or, I think, to anyone. Just The Ministry

In fact her first recorded book seems to be - wait for it - The Harrods Book of Pressure Cooking in the late 1940s.

Did she keep a file of all her recipes and recycle a few when the Spam company asked her to do the book in 2000? Who knows? I imagine most of the book's sales were to Monty Python fans and the like - few of whom probably belong to the generation for whom Ms Patten probably inspired more meals than E David and St Delia put together.

But I still dig out stuff from the near endless "500 Recipes for..." series she did in the 60s. As basic, tasty, fuss-free stuff goes, they're still jolly good.
flanneruk is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 11:34 AM
  #59  
 
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Absolutely. I still go back to Marguerite Patten's "Everyday" cookery book if I need a reliable reminder on basic techniques. I won't hear a word said against her - she's LOVELY.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Mar 13th, 2007, 04:02 AM
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Ms Patten was what we'd now call a home economist, working for Lord Woolton>>>>

Who achieved the ultimate accolade of having a pie named after him.
audere_est_facere is offline  

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