UK Cuisine Q?- SPAM Fritters?

Mar 11th, 2007, 05:40 AM
  #21  
 
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We had them at school but the only place I've seen them since, bizarrely, was when I worked for a regional health authority - although that was over 20 years ago. I loved them then, although not enough to want to make my own now ! So they are a recognised 1950s British dish, yes, but very rare now. I can imagine them being on the menu in an ironic way, somewhere like Monster Mash in Edinburgh, but not being requested very frequently.

It has to be admitted that 1950/60s British food was, in the main, horrible - but please don't add to the misconception that it's all still like that !
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Mar 11th, 2007, 09:09 AM
  #22  
 
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Yikes! It was the sixties, how old do I feel?

Apparently the Monty Python "spam" sketch is the origin of the use of the word "spam" in modern internet terms.
waring is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 03:20 AM
  #23  
 
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If you have Gmail, when you open the spam foolder the sponsored link is ionvvariably for some truly vile spam recipe.

THis is what I got today:

http://www.recipesource.com/main-dis...0/rec0025.html
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 03:21 AM
  #24  
 
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If you have Gmail, when you open the spam folder the sponsored link is invariably for some truly vile spam recipe.

This is what I got today:

http://www.recipesource.com/main-dis...0/rec0025.html
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 03:34 AM
  #25  
 
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You know that spam fajitas recipe would work just as well (OK: perhaps "well"'s not the right word, but just about the same) with a tin of the tomatoes that odd Texan bloke was on about instead of the peppers and salsa, and Dairylea replacing the Monterey Jack.
flanneruk is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 03:54 AM
  #26  
 
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The Texan geezer wanted to use that bright orange American plastic cheese, not Monterey Jack.
Like the rest of you, I haven't eaten spam since the 50s.
Josser is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:05 AM
  #27  
 
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I managed to find this article from last year
http://tinyurl.com/hdkx6

It's about items that still survive on supermarket shelves although most of us assume that they've been dead for ages.
It mentions among others spam, Angel Delight, Camp Coffee, Bisto, Izal loo paper (remember that from school?), Fray Bentos steak and kidney pie in a tin, Heinz sandwich spread and Smash (that dried potato stuff!)
Somebody must still buy it!
MissPrism is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:07 AM
  #28  
 
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I seem to remember my brother making a sort of poor man's bacon butty with grilled spam. It was a looong time ago...
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:10 AM
  #29  
 
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MissPrism - I remember Angel Delight as an "upmarket" version of Instant Whip - used to love the butterscotch flavour one...
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:16 AM
  #30  
 
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I got taken to a shop in New York - Greenwich Village ? - which sold this sort of stuff (and only this sort of stuff). So it's popular with somebody.

BTW 'Spam' is of course the proprietary name - the generic name is luncheon meat & that's what he had when I was young, whether as fritters (good) or as it comes (bad) with the almost equally horrible old-stylee British salad of lettuce, tomato & cucumber (no dressing except salad cream on the side).
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:26 AM
  #31  
 
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Talking about stuff that's still on sale, but you wouldn't expect it to be - I've seen powdered egg in supermarkets quite recently. I always remember my mother saying it was actually quite useful for baking, rather than being just another symbol of rationing and shortages.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:33 AM
  #32  
 
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Caroline - I too remember those insipid salads - Sunday teatime at my grandmother's house with boiled ham, if you were lucky and tinned pears or peaches with evaporated milk for dessert!

Do they still sell Vesta (dried) meals - my first introduction to beef curry and other exotic dishes such as chow mein?
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:48 AM
  #33  
 
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There is a company who do indeed buy up all the brands of our childhoods - and they're doing very well out of it. They even make salad cream.

They're relaunching Blue Nun. Apparently it's seen as sexy - something to do with Ann Summers. The mind boggles.

Spangles anyone?
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:50 AM
  #34  
 
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>>>>>
I got taken to a shop in New York - Greenwich Village ? - which sold this sort of stuff (and only this sort of stuff). So it's popular with somebody.
>>>>>

it had kind of a cult following for a while...part of both the retro and 'trailer trash' trends that have come and gone. kind of a 'so uncool it's cool' kind of thing. when i was on a project in the US, we went to a spam-fest...full of young hipsters thinking that it was cool to eat spam. that was circa 1998-99.
walkinaround is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:54 AM
  #35  
 
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If you Google Vesta ready meals, they seem to be available through those websites that cater for ex-pats.

I remember them.
You have to remember that all those ready meals that you find in supermarket chiller cabinets just didn't exist in the 50s and early 60s.
Do you remember all those "gourmet" recipes using concentrated soups?
MissPrism is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:58 AM
  #36  
 
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Those recipes are still on Campbells soup cans.

The thing that I would find incredible now is Libby's frozen concentrated orange juice which you had to thaw out and dilute.

Even the Galloping Gourmet couldn't cope with that. (The Galloping Gourmet is still around on the outskirts of sattelite land)
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 04:59 AM
  #37  
 
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p.s I love Fray Bentos tinned pies - they're gorgeous.
audere_est_facere is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 05:02 AM
  #38  
 
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Last time I trawled outdoor shops, comparison-wearing walking boots, I'm sure I saw a cache of Vesta meals in one camping section.

Just the job for singing Ging Gang Goolie Goolie round the fire you've made by rubbing two sticks together.
flanneruk is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 05:02 AM
  #39  
 
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"Do you remember all those "gourmet" recipes using concentrated soups?"

yes - I seem to remember a concoction using Campbells condensed mushroom soup, tinned tuna and pasta - delicious
Maria_H is offline  
Mar 12th, 2007, 05:19 AM
  #40  
 
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Back in the days when I helped flog groceries, the head offices of US-owned brands always had an obsession with using their products in recipes - things like Pringles casserole promotions.

The only people less interested in this nonsense than UK marketeers and retail buyers were UK housewives. Convenience food meant opening the tin and tucking in. If they wanted fancy, they'd go down the takeaway.
flanneruk is offline  

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