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U.S.-made gifts for Britons and Europeans?

U.S.-made gifts for Britons and Europeans?

Apr 2nd, 2004, 01:26 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
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Not wishing to be a wet blanket, but:

Isn't the first rule of present-giving that you think about the recipient?

And the sad downside of all this travelling and globalisation is that you can get pretty much anything anywhere. European shops are stuffed with Yankees memorabilia, for instance. Even relatively obscure US magazines are now in all Borders branches.

Now I don't know a single grown-up European who'd ever wear a cap of any description, and precious few (almost all with Dorian Grey complexes) who'd wear a shirt emblazoned with a sports team name. Most of us are mystified by maple syrup, and the concept of "premium" syrup is as odd as premium Coke. But each to his own taste - and in this case, the best judge of Sandykins' chums' taste is Sandykins.

Sandykins lives roughly as close to Britain as to California. The likelihood is the Britons Sandykins is visiting go to the US about as often as Sandykins goes to California (yes I know that, in this case, it'll turn out that Sandykins is in LA twice a week, but you all understand the general point).

So the answer isn't to scratch your head about what Brits or Italians might like. It's to think about what Charlotte or Piero might like. And to buy for them in the same frame of mind as you'd buy for Chuck or Mary-Beth if you were visiting them in California.

The resultant present might not be typically American. But it would be typically gracious, and symbolic of a friendship, not of nationalistic pigeon-holing.

Sandykins' friends are looking forward to seeing their friend Sandykins, not some stranger from America.
flanneruk is online now  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 01:55 AM
  #22  
 
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Oh Siobhan, thank you! I came here just to see if somebody has shed some light to my Depression Glass, and you did. I knew they were rare because the person who gave them to me said that she bought them from an antique shop. But she did not tell me about coupons!

But I think that is something you can give only if you know the person's taste.
elina is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 01:58 AM
  #23  
 
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I do know a couple of German men in their 40s who wear baseball caps when they're doing yard work or hanging about, etc. And I may not know them personally, but I have seen more than a few men in Brussels wearing them (and I live in arguably one of the "nicer" communes, Woluwe St. Pierre).
But I would only give them if you think a) they are likely to wear them and b) the team is currently in the news for a good reason (i.e., because the team is in the championship playoffs, not because their top player has been indicted for rape or brawling)
BTilke is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 02:35 AM
  #24  
 
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Elina,
They are usueally more abundant in 2nd hand shops and "antique" shops in the mid west from what I remember. There are specific colours (Rose, yellow and another). People would get a piece each week and eventually have the set. I believe they went out of fashion because of their link with the depression. I can't for the life of me think of the whole story behind them. I will ask my mother for you.

They were not hugely expensive 10-15 years ago but they get more valuable over the years and having a set i.e sugar and creamer with cups makes it more valuable. I think its quite quaint looking glass. It was considered cheap at the time but now looks pretty good to some of the junk we make these days.
SiobhanP is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 02:39 AM
  #25  
 
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Found this about depression glass on the web. It was given out in Cinemas not fairs!
_______________________________
Depression Glass

What is it?
Depression Glass is colorful or clear, machine-pressed glass made during the 30's and used as premiums in dime stores (chain emporiums where most things cost originally 5 or 10 cents). On slow nights, movie theaters also offered it to entice audiences through their doors..

Who used it and why?
Because it was cheap and available, almost everyone used it. We know of one "restaurant" where it was used exclusively. The glass is very brittle, so many odd pieces have not survived.

Why should I want it now?
The colors offered--red, blue, pink, green, and amber and clear-- fit somewhere into everyone's color scheme and are perfect for today's casual dining. Patterns range from the stylish Art Deco "Manhattan" to simpler, homey floral designs.

S
SiobhanP is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 02:50 AM
  #26  
 
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When did European men stop wearing baseball caps? We saw them all over the place in Germany and Austria 2 summers ago--and, yes, these were Europeans (either that or Americans who spoke German or French really, really well to the point that they spoke nothing else). Not most men, but certainly quite a few who were sightseeing or vacationing.
RufusTFirefly is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 02:52 AM
  #27  
 
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Oh, forgot I wanted to add that I agree, and I thought a given, that the first criterion in choosing a gift is to consider the the individual recipient. Don't take Berger's cookies to a diabetic. Don't take a cookbook to someone who hates cooking.
RufusTFirefly is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 03:34 AM
  #28  
 
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Rufus, British men over the age of 20 do not wear baseball caps. Full stop. Or period, as you over there in the baseball cap would say.
Kate is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 03:48 AM
  #29  
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Flanneruk is right that I should consider the tastes of a "chum," but in this case I was looking for a gift for someone I hardly know at all. The Vice-Principal of the college I attended at Oxford is taking me and my family to lunch when we visit this week, and I was at a complete loss as to what to get her. I hardly know her at all but wish to present her personally with a gift in addition to the check I am presenting to the college. I would know what to get a close friend, but in this case I think something representative of my home state of Maryland such as Old Bay seasoning and a book on Chesapeake Bay would be just right.

As for baseball caps, I think they are terrific gifts. Even though I never wear them, my children are delighted to receive gifts of caps bearing insignia of sports teams, colleges, etc. Again, this is a case of knowing a little bit about the recipient, as in whether they have children that would appreciate the caps, cookies, candies, etc. even if the recipient might not.

Got to get MYSELF some Berger's cookies and try them!

Love and appreciate all your ideas!
sandykins is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 04:15 AM
  #30  
 
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Could some-one explain what a catnip is?
waterloo is offline  
Apr 2nd, 2004, 06:01 AM
  #31  
 
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Thank you, Siobhan! I look at my glassware with different eyes, I like them even more now. I have a bowl, three serving "plates", and the best one: this thing for cheese (with a lid). Say Hi! to your mom, I like her taste.
elina is offline  
Apr 11th, 2004, 05:07 PM
  #32  
 
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Waterloo said: 'Could some-one explain what a catnip is?'
Catnip is a plant which drives my cats crazy! They love toys stuffed with it, it makes them all gooey. Kind of marijuana for cats, but not illegal and very safe
EnglishOne is offline  
Apr 11th, 2004, 07:16 PM
  #33  
 
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Psst, EnglishOne

That sneaky Rendezvous sauce and dry rub mix is reminding you of the wrong town. The Rendezvous is here in Memphis (I remember the threads from your trip planning).

Just thought I'd point that out, in case you wanted to stand it in the corner of your pantry.

Clifton is offline  
Apr 12th, 2004, 12:00 AM
  #34  
 
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There are so much things to bring to Europe and it doesn't has to be that special. Let's see: BBQ sauce (from Hunt's), sweet relish, cinnamon sweets, soapy scrub things for pots and pans called "SOS" (a miracle product I learned to know in your country), magnets, funny gadgets... after all it's the intention that counts, no?
martinewezel is offline  
Apr 12th, 2004, 02:10 AM
  #35  
 
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Clifton: I am in the corner of my pantry now, hanging my head in shame!! Actually, as soon as I posted that I knew I had 'boobed' on which town it reminded me of, I just hoped no one would notice :8 I was waiting for a sharp eyed Memphisonian - It was a slip of the keyboard!!!
EnglishOne is offline  
Apr 12th, 2004, 04:36 AM
  #36  
 
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Ah, I knew it had to be something like that. I always do things like that, my mind ahead or behind my fingers. Every now and then though, we send out a bad batch that reminds people of New Orleans or Fargo.

No offense on my part! I'm a transplant. Mostly just teasing you a little. I think the idea of BBQ sauces and rubs is a very good one.


Clifton is offline  
Apr 12th, 2004, 04:38 AM
  #37  
 
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Clifton: ;-)
martinewezel is offline  
Apr 12th, 2004, 04:44 AM
  #38  
 
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Still,... I meant what I wrote!
martinewezel is offline  
Apr 12th, 2004, 04:51 AM
  #39  
 
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Oh, sorry Martin. My post was actually to EnglishOne. Apologies for any misunderstanding!
Clifton is offline  
Apr 12th, 2004, 05:08 AM
  #40  
 
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No misunderstandings at all! Jokes are always appreciated!
martinewezel is offline  

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