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U.K. Coronation Street Q: Like a Blackpool Maiden on Jubilee Day

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Sep 22nd, 2006, 08:20 AM
  #1
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U.K. Coronation Street Q: Like a Blackpool Maiden on Jubilee Day

I'm a Coronation Street junkie and like to know what they're talking about when using British only phrases... i thank the many Brits who've answered past questions "Corrie" questions.

Now - last night Jack and Vera were arguing - no news here - and Vera was wearing some gaudy dress she thought looked great but Jack said, disdainingly, "You look like a Blackpool maiden on Jubilee Day"

Whilst i know all about Blackpool and its tacky reputation the bit about maiden on Jubilee Day intrigues me?

Translation?

Thanks in advance.
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 08:25 AM
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Jubilee's only occur rarely - ie the 25th, 50th and 60th year of a monarch's reign so they are big events.

We celebrate these by having parties, street parties in particular and dressing up is a major part of this.

So what he is saying is that Vera is dressed up beyond the call of duty - ie very overdressed.
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 08:30 AM
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well that fits in exactly with the way he thought she was dressed. Thanks.

So Jubilee Day is really a big event all over England? When will be the next one, God willing?
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 08:36 AM
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If Her Majesty lives long enough it would be her Diamond jubilee in 2012.

Failing that Charles would have to reign for 25 years from her death. Then William 25 years from his succession etc. Like I said they're rare events.
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 09:20 AM
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If it's a real Salford saying, and not just dreamt up by the scriptwriters - as ''er indoors' was - I'd bet a stone of dressed tripe it doesn't refer to any Jubilee any of the Windsors were involved with.

No-one in Britain - apart from those a handful at the fringe of sanity as we know it - has got dressed up for any Royal occasion since the Coronation.

The odd street party for Brenda's 25th and 50th, sure. Rock guitarists playing the National Anthem on an electric guitar from the top of Buck House. But the last time people took a Jubilee seriously seriously and the entire population pulled out their best whistles (as the merchant bankers call them) was Vicki Battenberg's 60th, back in 1897.

Maybe Audere lives in some Lord Luv Yer Guv theme park. But no sign of any mass breakout of sartorial excess in Liverpool, London or the Cotswolds at the last Jubilee.
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 10:11 AM
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I think flanner might have forgotten 1935. Fair amount of dressing up, local parades and parties then.

Oh and BTW, not that it's of the slightest importance, Queen Victoria was never a Battenberg. They were the kind of people she married her grandchildren to.
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 10:20 AM
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We had a formal dance in our village for the Silver Jubilee but the women were all in tasteful posh frocks,
Nobody looked like a Blackpool maiden.
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 12:39 PM
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I can't help wondering if there's some reason why the word "maiden" is there. I suspect it may be the idea that a maiden may be rather rare in Blackpool. Especially after a Jubilee knees-up.
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Sep 22nd, 2006, 12:51 PM
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Patrick:

I can think of nothing more important than getting little Vicky's surname wrong. But Saxe-Coburg-Gotha just doesn't read as well, does it?

More relevantly, people didn't dress up in 1935. I wasn't there at the time: but my grandparents vividly remembered Victoria's jubilee, while no-one could remember George's. When pressed, the most my parents or grandparents could ever say was that there were a few civic processions.
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Sep 23rd, 2006, 03:10 AM
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I think we're all getting it wromg about maiden - and about dressing up.

I never heard the word 'maiden' used in the North of England except:
- in songs you were taught at school, or
- to denote an over where the bowler stopped the batsman from scoring, or
- to describe the contraption that hung over the stairs on the top landing, on which your clothes dried. People described this, when talking about local words, as "clothes maiden". But actually, you always put wet on just on "the maiden".

So IF PalQ's not making this up, and IF the scriptwriters weren't making it up either (and I wouldn't bet a thrippeny bit on either), then it's either about:
- racks flung up across Blackpool streets on Jubilee days to hang bunting off, or
- hookers in Blackpool all tarted up on Jubilee days to attract custom from the young lads with a day off. The real point about the 1887, 1897, 1935, 1977 and 2002 Jubilees was everyone got a day off. Unmarried men in Lancs and the west of Scotland would have gone out for the day (the married ones left at home to deal with he kids' street party). And Blackpool was noted for the young ladies offering a different kind of fun. It wouldn't be at all surprising if they were called "Blackpool maidens". Or if they were actually called "Blackpool whores" but the Coronation scriptwriters bowdlerised it: the programme does go out before the watershed.

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Sep 23rd, 2006, 03:45 PM
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One can't beat Jack and Vera's repartee!
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Sep 25th, 2006, 04:26 AM
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Since when has blackpool been famous for toms?

I can see that it has always had a fairly raffish air, in a Donald McGill postcard kind of way - but it has never had a reputation for tarts (as far as I know).

I suspect that the scriptwriters made it up (the phrase "gone pear shaped" was made up in the Sweeney for instance)

We had a street party for the jubilee on my manor - hard as nails SW19 - and the little kids dressed up. The adult just wore ordinary clothes and drank tooo much beer (well this one did).
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Sep 25th, 2006, 05:43 AM
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Must be a right bunch of poseurs in SW19.

We didn't put our best clothes on even at the street party for the Coronation. Nor did the kids on the N1 housing estate we were living not quite in in 1977. Nor on the Cotswold town archery ogreen in 2002

Prossies in Blackpool were a source of mild adolescent sniggering in early 60s Lancashire. A variant - normally respectable women making a few bob on the side when away from home - occurs in Woodruff's autobiographical "Road to Nab End"
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Sep 25th, 2006, 05:50 AM
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Must be a right bunch of poseurs in SW19. >>>>>>

Not arf guvnor! Haven't you heard of Henman Hill?

I had never heard of blackpool being well known for tarts. You learn something new every day.

It's full of gays these days you know. Sic transit gloria swanson and all that.
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Sep 25th, 2006, 06:10 AM
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Palenque, I saw the episode yesterday. It was actually a Blackpool LANDLADY (I assume of a B&B). I have this vision of large-breasted blousy lady of a certain age - think Beth Lynch
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Sep 25th, 2006, 06:52 AM
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O'Reilly - i saw same episode again yesterday on CBC and heard the same thing - oops close but no cigar. At least Flanner knows he would have lost his bet - i wasn't making it up, just got it a bit wrong. Don't know but some how when someone accuses me of lying or potentially lying it raises my hackles. The nerve!
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Sep 25th, 2006, 06:59 AM
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As if he had ANY reason to make such a charge - in my 100s of posts i would like him to point out one made up thing - mistakes maybe but no fabrication! It's like when Christina accused me of plagiarizing something once - the gall of charges like those! But then take the high ground and let it pass, that's the best solution.
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Sep 25th, 2006, 07:07 AM
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Blackpool has a red light district like any other place that attracts visitors, but I agree it's not a major thing in town, and never has been, though saucy sex shows became popular from 1950s on the Golden Mile. It's better know as a gay resort to rival Brighton, and second only to Manchester in the North.
What Jack D was referring to as 'Blackpool maidens' probably harks back to the heyday of tourism before the war, when the town attracted hordes of visitors. At that time there was social stratification at work, so the posh North Shore and North Pier attracted 'better' clientele of middle-class visitors, while the central (formerlly south) and south (then Victorian) pier was a magnet for the working classes staying in 'boarding houses' in a warren of streets off the promenade. 'Maidens' were probably poshed up ladies on North Shore with their umbrellas and dogs, going to an afternoon tea and concert on North Pier.
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Sep 25th, 2006, 07:16 AM
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Actually the fact that the phrase is "Blackpool Landlady" doesn't automatically clarify things.

A landlady could be running a B+B or a pub. The one running the pub would be more likely to be dressed up.

I've never noticed any brasses around when I've been up there. I have of course noticed the large number of males in colour co-ordinated outfits and good personal grooming.

Blackpool has more hotel rooms than Portugal. AUDERETRUFACT!

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Sep 25th, 2006, 07:28 AM
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"Hotel Rooms" or "Rooms" - haven't seen many of what i'd call hotels in Blackpool save the big one just north of the Tower but lots of guesthouses and B&Bs - though i don't doubt you and, even with both types of rooms, that's a mind-boggling statistic!
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