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Transfer From US job to UK job...Tips, tricks, etiquette :)

Transfer From US job to UK job...Tips, tricks, etiquette :)

Old Dec 16th, 2013, 03:26 PM
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11)b and probably paracetamol.
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Old Dec 16th, 2013, 10:32 PM
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>>Latest census has shown about 60% identify themselves as Christians<<

But it didn't ask them what they actually do about it, in terms of going to church or participating in an ongoing church community (other than as necessary to establish credentials to get the children into a church school).

Most of us may have been brought up culturally Christian, but that's not quite the same thing; "CofE" is the default option, and many people for whom religion matters little will likewise not bother to sign themselves up as atheists (that suggests a degree of enthusiastic commitment to actually spending time on the question).

You're unlikely to see many signs of the kind of fervour I'd associate (from occasional TV shows, I will admit) with the mass evangelistic operations and Southern Baptists of the US, outside largely African and Afro-Caribbean Pentecostalist congregations - which may not be that much in evidence in Farnborough.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 12:04 AM
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Speaking of Stickly, I hope that breakfast personality doesn't win.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 01:27 AM
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{ <<He never acknowledged the existence of any of his employees outside the office. Even if he got into the elevator with you in the morning, he appeared to have never seen you in his life. >>

Quite right too. Nothing more awkward than someone who thinks it's ok to strike up a conversation in a lift, in the supermarket queue, or on the bus. There isn't much space in this little island, so don't invade my bubble. Keep your distance, both physical and metaphorical.}

If the island is so crowded that saying, "Good morning", or even just a nod of recognition, is too stressful, maybe a little thinning of the herd is in order.

Funny that the Netherlands, which is far more densely populated, doesn't have this constant jockeying to put other people in their place. I think you've got to blame it on something else.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 01:37 AM
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Hopefully without offending anyone, "actuarial" experts tend to have certain mind sets that preclude greeting people.

However I was reading Debretts recently (I know must get out more) in a book shop and the correct behaviour in a lift is to avoid eye contact and make as little noise as possible.

For those thinking "Pink Panther" and Peter Sellers, I'm leaving now.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 02:51 AM
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You have to remember that on the whole, we drink a lot more than most Americans. I remember a friend of mine working for an American company in London. They were going to give a presentation to which the press were invited. A female director trilled that she had lots of fun ideas for non-alcoholic cocktails to serve to the press. The British staff were horrified. The idea of journalists panting like the hart for cooling booze and being given pineapple cocktails chilled their blood
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 04:25 AM
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Definition of Actuary . . Someone who could not stand the excitement of accounting!
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 04:44 AM
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"there is no welcome pack but if there were it would include tea bags, an Oyster card and one free entry into the Telegraph fantasy football."

Americans need no introduction to tea bags. Just to the fact that what's in them is worth drinking only after <b> boiling </b> water's been added, and that the only way of making tea worse than drinking it iced, is if the water it's been iced with has been previously chlorinated.

Oysters don't work around Farnborough, and no medium - not even the ghastly Guardian - signals "not one of you" to more people than the Telegraph.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 04:45 AM
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And while we're at it:

"Fun" in English is a noun. NEVER an adjective
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 05:15 AM
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The Telegraph Fantasy Football League has nothing to do with reading the paper, signalling a particular political alliance, or indicating anything other than the fact you are a football fan. You really are tiresome in your efforts to prove yourself the definitive authority on everything.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 06:38 AM
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>>Oysters don't work around Farnborough<<

Too upmarket: I assume they mostly rely on a couple of cans of Tennants.

Unless, of course, you mean the electronic payment card.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 10:27 AM
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{There isn't much space in this little island, so don't invade my bubble. Keep your distance, both physical and metaphorical}

{You have to remember that on the whole, we drink a lot more than most Americans.}

Yes, getting drunk helps to simulate sociability.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 10:31 AM
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We used to say that an actuary was someone who wanted to be an accountant, but didn't have the personality.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 03:36 PM
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Thank you, Flanner, for pointing out that fun is a noun. Used as an adjective, it is my pettest peeve.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 11:43 PM
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What no one has said as we all have concentrated on the etiquette question is do not bring your electrical equipment to the UK.
Things like tv may not work, some radios may have a different scale especially on FM, so I have read.
Obviously the plugs will be different.
I am confused as to whether the US use 100volts or 250 volts these days.
If what I read on travel forums washing machines in Europe can confuse Americans
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 11:57 PM
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<There isn't much space in this little island>

Daily Mail nonsense. 2.6% of UK land is built on (or 5.2% if you include gardens and parks). There's space enough.
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Old Dec 17th, 2013, 11:58 PM
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Oh wow, this is great stuff lol thanks everyone!
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Old Dec 18th, 2013, 12:02 AM
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Fridge sizes may be a surprise

space question is interesting, what proportion of an island should be exclusively occupied by one species? If you include farming as given over to the same species and exclude mountain tops etc what figure do we reach and how many other species have to live in what is left?
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Old Dec 18th, 2013, 12:35 AM
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A lot of people have much smaller fridges than in the US.
Mine is a smallish larder fridge. However, my son has one of those large double doors jobs, that makes ice and probably makes you a cup of tea if you ask it nicely. They are available.
It's years since I used an American washing machine, but I remember that it loaded at the top and had very simple instructions.
European ones are front loading and the latest ones are very energy efficient. I must confess that I use only about three of the many settings on mine.
I think that tourists sometimes have trouble because holiday lettings often have cheap washer/dryers. These are to be avoided. You're better with a separate washing machine and dryer.
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Old Dec 18th, 2013, 03:57 AM
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You will find that the temperature scale generally used here is Celsius, but will should soon get used to that in weather forecasts and other everyday matters. Zero is freezing, 20 is comfortable spring/summer and 30 is hot (for us, at least). Everything else is in between. The popular press reverts to the Fahrenheit scale when forecasting high temperatures - "100 degress: phew, what a scorcher!"

The celsius scale is used on ovens, so you will need to convert the recipes you bring. Conversion tables are simple, and used to be commonplace in recipe books. Most people here have probably forgotten the old fahrenheit cookery temperatures and the gas regulo numbers, so you may need to make your own conversion table for handy use.

Weights and measures are generally expressed in metric measures, but actual sizes may not be metric. That is why you will see coffee in 227g packs - it's half a pound. Colloquially, we still tend to use the old imperial measures - mpg for car fuel consumption, for example, but don't forget that the U.K. gallon is larger than the U.S. gallon and there are some measures that we don't regularly use, like the bushel. The U.S. measure that I never seen over here is the acre-foot, used to describe the capacity of a reservoir or lake.

For weighing people the kilo is becoming more common and is used in hospitals, etc. Colloquially, we use the stone and pound, a stone being 14 pounds. The weight of babies is almost always expressed in pounds and ounces, just as most people know their height in feet and inches.

For everyday purposes, when estimating a distance, a metre is the same as a yard.
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