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Traditional English dishes to try in London?

Traditional English dishes to try in London?

Old Jul 18th, 2005, 02:05 PM
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Traditional English dishes to try in London?

Can anyone recommend some traditional English dishes we should try beyond fish and chips? Also, please explain to me what the dish contains, as I have found that English food seems to have cryptic names! Thanks!
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 02:23 PM
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Roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, the latter rather like a popover but made (one hopes) with beef drippings.

Scones with clotted cream (in between butter and heavy whipped cream)and jam.

Ploughman's Lunch at a pub--a slab of bread with cheese and pickles.



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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 02:30 PM
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Try a meat pie. There is a wonderful pie shop in Greenwich, a suburb of London which is worth a visit anyway. You could also consider Indian cuisine to almost be a British standard today. It is excellant there. Pub food is usually a good bargain and often traditional.
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 02:31 PM
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Just what about spotted dick do you find cryptic?
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 02:34 PM
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My favorite Sticky Toffe Pudding ( cake-like with raisin/dates but sometimes neither with a very rich carmel sauce and usually served with lashes of cream or ice cream)

Spotted Dick(actually not quite sure as it's been awhile but raisins and custard seem to be involved)

Steak & Kidney Pie (speaks for itself)

Cheese & Pickle Sandwich (the pickle is actually chutney)
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 03:06 PM
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And you could always look out for in no particular order:

Toad in the hole
Bubble and Squeak
Pie and Mash with parsley liquor
Jellied eels
Bangers and Mash
Faggots
Trifle
Jam Roly Poly
Bread and Butter Pudding
Scotch Eggs






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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 03:10 PM
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David_london- thanks for the reply, but what the heck are some of these things? Why does english food have secret code names?!
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 03:31 PM
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What about 'cock-a-leekie', which is a chicken boiled in stock with 4 leeks and 6 prunes.

If you are there in late December try Xmas pudding, and 'winter hotchpotch', which is a soup based on artichokes, carrots, turnips and macaroni.

'Yorkshire pudding' is a batter that often accompanies a roast beef dish; but it also can be eaten as a dessert with jam spread.

'Scotch woodcock' is basically anchovies on toast.

Enjoy and gain a pound or two!

Harzer



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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 06:01 PM
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>Try a meat pie. There is a wonderful pie shop in Greenwich ...
Goddards Pie House (45 Greenwich Church St SE10)
10am-6.30pm Monday to Thursday, and 10am-9.30pm from Friday to Sunday.
Don't forget to have some mushy peas with your pie.
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 06:05 PM
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MMMMMMmmmmmmmmm Whitebait!!
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 06:32 PM
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And a bacon sarney at Portobello..God they smell so good

And if you're in Scotland try Rumbledethumps and cullen skink
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 06:45 PM
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Ooooh, Whitebait! Yum!

Whitebait are tiny little fish that are dipped in batter and cooked in hot oil. You eat them whole, heads, tails, guts and all I suppose, as they are much too small to clean. I don't look too closely. They are delicious!

Also Pork Pies are just yummy! Look in any good shop or supermarket. Eaten cold they are sure to clog any artery, but are simply great in a pub with a pint.

Scotch eggs, too. They are a hard boiled egg surrounded by some sort of sausage meat, dipped in bread crumbs, and briefly browned in hot oil. They look like brown tennis balls in the shops or pubs. I love them, unless you get one which contains a pickled egg. Those are horrid. Makes a fine pub lunch -- again with a pint or two.

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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 06:50 PM
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I have been to London twice and while I LOVE LONDON!!! The food sucks!! Go to Chinatown by far the best Chinese food I have ever had.
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 06:56 PM
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Marmite!!!!!!!
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 07:43 PM
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"The food sucks!!" What a monumentally ridiculous statement. Sure -- IF you pick wrong the food can "suck" just like back home. But some of the very best restaurants anywhere are in London.

From inexpensive fresh sandwich shops to 3 star Michelin places and everything in between - there is plenty of wonderful food in London.

"London food is terrible" is left over conventional wisdom from 35 years ago . . . . .
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Old Jul 18th, 2005, 07:47 PM
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My favourite Sunday dinner in a pub in London:

Roast beef with Yorkshire pudding and Apple Crumble for desert
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Old Jul 19th, 2005, 12:12 AM
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Stargazey Pie
A Cornish pilchard pie with the heads sticking out of the pastry.
Bakewell Tart
A short crust pastry tart filled with jam, ground almonds and beaten egg.
West Country Clotted Cream Tea
Drop scones served with strawberry jam and clotted cream, served with a pot of tea and extra hot water to top it up.
Potted Shrimps
Lightly seasoned Morecombe Bay shrimps in butter.
Pork Pies
Melton Mowbray raised pork pies are made from lard pastry, filled with chopped pork, topped off with pork jelly. A little anchovy sauce is added.
Suet puddings
Suet is fat found around the kidneys of cattle, used to make a kind of soft pastry filled with steak and kidney or as a dessert with something sweet like golden syrup."Spotted Dick and Custard" is a rather alarmingly named sweet variety.
Probably the nicest savoury form is a bacon and sage roll.
Bubble and Squeak
Left over cabbage and mashed potato made into patties and shallow fried.
English Cooked Breakfast
The "Full English Breakfast" is rarely eaten at home but is looked forward to when staying in hotels. Fried bacon, sausages, fried egg, black pudding, fried tomatoes, fried bread and baked beans followed by toast and marmalade with a pot of tea.
Kippers
A split and smoked herring used as an alternative to the "cooked breakfast" above.
Pie and Mash
Pie and Mash shops are a traditional London speciality. They serve jellied eels, meat pies and mashed potato with a "liquor" which is a type of parsley sauce.

I am jealous.....
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Old Jul 19th, 2005, 12:16 AM
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Hi
Great to see you are trying different English food.
You will see 'Sunday roasts' advertised everywhere. This is a meal of roast beef/chicken/lamb/pork (could be any of these) usually served with roast potatoes, gravy, veg (often peas and carrots) and Yorkshire pudding.
Yorkshire pudding is a mixture of flour, eggs and milk made into a batter and then cooked in the oven in a little of the roast meat fat. They were traditionally served as a first course with gravy BEFORE the meatcourse to take the edge off your appetite when meat was scarce. Any leftovers were spread with jam, honey or treacle for dessert.
Toad in the hole is the Yorkshire Pudding batter as described above poured into a large flat pan with sausages dotted in it. The batter rises when cooked, going broan and crisp on the outside and light and golden in the centre, half covering the sausages. Traditionally served with onion gravy and I make a version with an ale gravy which is delicious.
Bubble and squeak is leftover mashed potatoes and cabbage (also works with sprouts) mashed together with salt, pepper and a little butter and then fried until the edges tinge with brown. Traditionally served for breakfast with a fried egg on top and bacon on the side.
Fish cakes are very popular right now. Many different recipes but often white fish and mashed potatoes mixed up with maybe a chopped up hard boiled egg and some herbs, covered in breadcrumbs and fried. Good served with parsley sauce. Much nicer than they sound!
Stews and casseroles are also popular, usually made with beef. Slow cooked in beer or Guinness (makes a beautiful rich dark gravy). If you can find this served with dumplings even better! Dumplings are little round balls of flour, water and suet that swell up when cooked and are just delicious.
M
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Old Jul 19th, 2005, 12:52 AM
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Forget fish and chips or roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, the British national dish is chicken tikka masala.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/netnotes/a...475218,00.html
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Old Jul 19th, 2005, 03:46 AM
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Not "traditional" -- in that it was first created in the 1970's, but hard to find outside the UK: Banoffee Pie -- A cream pie with a layer of toffee, a layer of bananas, and a layer of whipped or double cream lightly flavored with coffee. A very good desert -- or, as they say in the UK, puddin'.
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