Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Tourist Attractions in London and Paris other than your typical art museums and cathedrals and such

Tourist Attractions in London and Paris other than your typical art museums and cathedrals and such

Jul 26th, 1998, 07:31 PM
  #1  
Aaron
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Tourist Attractions in London and Paris other than your typical art museums and cathedrals and such

I'm a 14 year old boy interested in finding some attractions that might suit me. Please, if you know of any places that fit these descriptions, e-mail me with info. I'd very much appreciate. Thank you for your time.
Science museums fancy me. Anyone know of a good science museum, not neccesarily "hand-ons", where i could observe such things as Neuton's laws?
I recall seeing a natural history museum somewhere. Dinosaurs fascinate me and I would much like to see a european museum where I could view dinosaur skeletons and fossils.
A museum containing vintage motorcycles including BSA's and Triumphs, etc, with which I could visit with my dad would be ideal. Also, I believe there is some kind of airplane museum in London containing WWII planes (or something along the lines of that). A general British car museum would be good too.
 
Jul 27th, 1998, 09:32 AM
  #2  
Christina
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Well, I can't advise on London as I haven't been
there for a while (although I do recommend the
City of London museum highly), but Paris has a
very good Science and Industry museum. I presume
your dad has, or will get, a good guidebook for your
visit--it should list all major museums, including
this one. If you want to explore some more first,
go to the Paris Tourist Org. WEB Site (www.paris.org)
and then click on the section about museums--it
lists many in Paris. France does have some good
transport museums (RR and car), but they are in
other cities, unfortunately (Mulhouse in the Alsace region,
I think).
I'm sure you will get some people to advise you to
visit the "Catacombs" in Paris, so I will mention it first
and advise against it--this "tourist attraction" offends
me, and while I am not traditionally religious, I find it
disrespectful towards the dead.
I especially dislike the attitudes expressed by many
tourists who visit it, as seen on BBs such as this
one, that it is some lighthearted tourist site like
Disneyland or something. Anyway, the catacombs
are underground tunnels where authorities
dumped the skeletons of many disinterred Parisians
when they wanted to do urban renewal or something
in the old cemetery area (I think in the 1800s). I
don't see why anyone other than someone
interested in historical urban renewal should want
to see this, or need to; I felt it quite disturbing, and
I didn't know what it was when I went to it, or I
wouldn't have gone.
 
Jul 27th, 1998, 12:26 PM
  #3  
Roger
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
In London they have the Natural History Museum. When you first enter you will see a large dinosaur skeleton. Many other interesting things to see. Around the corner is the Science Museum which is really something! They have Old cars, trains Space stuff and much more. Be sure to visit both.
 
Jul 27th, 1998, 01:00 PM
  #4  
Betsy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

In London: The RAF (Royal Air Force) Museum in Hendon, north London should be very interesting to you. They have a fantastic collection of airplanes from the turn of the century to WWII bombers and they even have a Harrier. There is also a display of the Battle of Britain with air raid sirens to give you a feel for what it was really like. The closest Underground station is Colindale on the Northern Line but it might be a bit of a walk from there.

For dinosaurs the Natural History Museum in South Kensington is a must. And the Science museum around the corner should be of interest as well. Closest Underground station South Kensington on both the District and Circle lines.

 
Jul 27th, 1998, 06:40 PM
  #5  
Karen
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
In London, The British War Museum and The War Rooms used by Churchill and other staff members during WWII...both very interesting displays and worth alot of time viewing.
 
Jul 28th, 1998, 05:51 PM
  #6  
Dennis
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Here are three possibilities in Paris. 1) The National Technical Museum (Musee National des Techniques) at the Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers. This is an excellent museum in the history of technology and science and includes many large-scale machines (Foucault's pendulum is here but go and see the one currently in the Pantheon). 2) Parc de la Villette. This is a futurist science museum including La Geode which has a huge 360 degree movie screen. 3) Finally, and a lot less ambitious than the other two, try the Musee des Transports Urbains. This features a sort of history of urban transportation with vehicles dating back 300 years.
 
Jul 29th, 1998, 05:02 AM
  #7  
Molly
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
We went to London recently with our 5 and 7 year old boys and found that the Science Museum and the Natural History Museum were awesome. We spent 6 hours in the Natural History Museum alone! Also, Cabinet War Rooms are incredible. You are guided by audio phones that allow you to hear the basic tour, or actual meetings, correspondence etc of Churchill's. It is really worth it to see this museum. Also, try the Victoria and Albert Museum. It is in the same complex as the Science and Nat. History Museums and is supposed to unparalleled. We didn't make it there, but regret not going. We can tell from experience that the above 3 we did go to were worth every minute spent there. Have fun!
 
Jul 29th, 1998, 05:17 AM
  #8  
Molly
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hi Aaron, it's Molly again. I forgot to mention that there is a London Transport Museum near the Covent Garden Tube, but it looks like it tells the history of public transport in London and doesn't have the vintage stuff you are looking for. The Science Museum does have a hangar-sized exhibit of airplanes from the first attempts to recent models. Also, the Natural History Museum has lots of dinosaurs and terrific exhibits that you may like.
 
Jul 29th, 1998, 09:37 AM
  #9  
Maira
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Aaron: I enjoyed the British Library tremendously. Besides having the original Magna Carta, they have the original handwritten notes and lirics for some Beattles songs (written by John Lennon), handwritten notes from Galileo, Newton, Michelangelo, Guthenberg Bible, etc...My husband is not into art or Cathedrals and got the biggest kick out of this place...don't miis it!
 
Jul 29th, 1998, 10:06 AM
  #10  
Richard L. Deming
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
On Saturday, July 8th, I had a very nice tour at the Belvoir Castle with Globus group. Do you where the castle located? Because I wanted to write the story about this interesting collection of paintings of the Rutland family. I hope you can answer my question and please reply it as soon as possible. Thank you and smile!
 
Jul 29th, 1998, 03:12 PM
  #11  
wes fowler
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Aaron,
You might find the British Army Museum in London interesting. I did! It's on the banks of the Thames alongside the Chelsea Royal Hospital. The nearest tube stop is Sloan Square.
 
Aug 1st, 1998, 09:54 AM
  #12  
Ben Haines
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

I'm afraid I'm not good on Paris, but if you go into http://www.pariscope.fr, then work your way into their pages on "expos" I think you'll get details of all the museums. In French, of course, but that won't bother you. ..........................................

Now London. The site http://www.io-ltd.com/london/museums/index.htm lists of all the large museums, with brief description and opening times. In South Kensington are the Natural History Museum (strong on dinosaurs), open 10 to 5.50, Sundays 11 to 5.50, children's ticket three pounds (about five US dollars), and the Science Museum (strong on Newton: has some bikes), open daily 10 to 6, your ticket 3 pounds 50 (about six dollars). Less famous, but good, are the Kew Bridge Steam Museum (Kew Bridge station, by rail from Waterloo Station), open daily 11 to 5, but with engines in steam weekends and bank holidays, your ticket two pounds, and the Tower Bridge museum, at the southern end of the bridge: I'm afraid I've no details. .................................................. ..........

There are some planes hanging in the great hall of the Imperial War Museum (tube station Lambeth North), open daily 10 to 6, your ticket 2 pounds 25. Before you go you might phone them, 0171 416 5000, to ask what films they'll be showing free that week. In the same phone call you could ask them to tell you about the Air museum at Duxford, forty miles from London, which is rich in such planes, and now has a section to honour your grandfathers' work in freeing Europe. The quickest way is by bus from Aldwych: I think the Imperuial War Museum can tell you what time it goes, and from where. The Duxford Mmuseum has a good site at http://www.iwm.org.uk/duxford.htm, and a hyperlink to the museum at Lambeth North.
.................................................. ......................
I'm afraid I can't think of a good motor cycle museum in London, but if you buy a family railcard and take a train 70 minutes out from Euston to Birmingham you'll find the right museum there. You could write now to the Tourist Information Office in Birmingham, but before that look at the site http://www.reading.ac.uk/AcaDepts/sc...t/av/en19.html, which has links to "Other aircraft collections in the UK". You might look there for the Basttle of Britain museum, nearish to London. With a bit of rush you could combine the Birmingham museum with a view of the Motor History Museum in Stratford upon Avon. You'll be the only lad in Stratford not to go to see the Birthplace, and jolly good too: in my opinion people ought to develop their own tastes and see what interests them, not what others put on a list.
.................................................. ........................
While we can't show you many motors nor bikes in London, we can show some fine old busses, at the London Transport Museum in Convent Garden, open 10 to 6 (Friday 11 to 6), your ticket 2 pounds 95 (about five dollars).
.................................................. ..........................
As to other technologies, there's a good small surgical museum beside London Bridge station, the Old Operating Theatre, but I'm afraid I've no details.
.................................................. .......................
Optical and other technological history are on show at the Museum of the Moving Image, at the southern end of Waterloo Bridge, Embankment tube and over the river. Open 10 to 6 (last admission 5), your ticket 4 pounds 50. If you phone in advance to the attached National Film Theatre, 0171 928 3232, and tell them what sort of films you like they'll tell you what you could book with a credit card. For example, this week's shows include Errol Flyn (ask your father) as Robin Hood, 1938, Star Kids (boy your age borrows a cybersuit and goes into space by mistake: he meets the Bloodwarriors and wishes he hadn't), and E T The Extra Terrestial, which I bet you've seen on TV, but recommend for re-view on big screen. Do you remember the moment when the bicycles went up in the air ?
.................................................. .......................
Which takes me on to theatre. The Hampstead Theatre has a play on Darwinism, called After Darwin, and earlier the Haymarket had one on Turing, the computer theoretician. If you'll tell me a couple of weeks before you come, and remind me of your interests, it will be a pleasure to check the listings and to see what's on.
.................................................. .......................
I agree with notes others have given on the RAF Museum, but am not sure that the British Library, the Museum of London, nor the Victoria and Albert respond to the tastes you have given.
.................................................. ..........................
There you are, and not an art gallery in sight. I have enjoyed putting these notes together: please write again if I can help further, and when you know your dates. Also, if I have the wrong end of the stick, or if there are other topics that take your fancy. I first saw the great museums of London when I was 14, in 1951, and I had a good time.
.................................................. .....................
Welcome to my city.
.................................................. ..........................
Ben Haines
F
 
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Mamaw
Europe
10
Feb 6th, 2008 03:07 PM
ilovetotravel29
Europe
14
Apr 26th, 2006 10:47 AM
Eric
Europe
7
Sep 16th, 2002 01:15 AM
Becky
Europe
14
Jul 5th, 2002 08:05 AM
marilyn lunsford
Europe
4
May 18th, 1999 09:40 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:35 AM.