To all Italian speakers

Apr 6th, 2006, 06:25 AM
  #1  
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To all Italian speakers

Here's a language question for anyone who speaks Italian.

The verb "prendare" means "to take" in Italian, but someone told me it's not proper usage when you're saying "to take a taxi." Supposedly, there's another verb that substitutes for "prendare" in that statement.

OK, all you Berlitzers: Any answers?
j_999_9 is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 06:31 AM
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First of all, it's not "prendare" but "prendere".

I generally use "andare in taxi". N.B. "Andare" is an irregular verb.
Eloise is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 06:32 AM
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PrendEre, not prendAre

Andare in taxi = To go by taxi? I think that andare is used in other, similar contexts -- andare in piedi (on foot), in bicicletta (by bicycle).

ps I am not an Itlaian speaker, but I have studied a bit off and on
kayd is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 07:16 AM
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Sorry for the misspelling, but anyway ...

I understand the use of "andare" but is it appropriate when, for instance, you say to a cab driver, "Take us to the Vatican"? Or "Can you take us to the Vatican?"

This isn't so much a practical question, as I realize there are ways to get around saying that and still making yourself understood(for example, "andiamo Vaticano"), but I'm curious about the proper usage.
j_999_9 is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 07:45 AM
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Well, you could say, "Volgiamo andare al Vaticano, per favore" (we want to go to the Vatican). Or else the conditional of volere, which for first person plural I don't remember and my grammar book is at home. I only know first person singular "Vorrei andare..." b/c my trips to Italy have been by myself.
DejaVu is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 07:51 AM
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Prendere would be inappropriate for "take me to the Vatican" - it's not take as in "lead me to" or "get me to" - it's take as in take a book off a shelf.

But at any rate, you don't even need a verb - just "Al Vaticano," for example, would suffice, or "vorrei andare al..."
StCirq is online now  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:00 AM
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I may not be making myself clear.

I understand there are alternatives to "take me to the Vatican." My question is: Forget the alternatives -- how do you say to a taxi driver, "Take me to the Vatican"?
j_999_9 is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:03 AM
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prendere -to catch, seize; to take; to get, to win; to handle; to have

The context here is to "take a prize" or prey or college degree" or "to take a cup of coffee" or "have a cup of coffee"

ANDARE IN + means of transportation to go by (taxi, on foot, by Metro, etc.)

This is from "Italian - 750 Verbs and Their Uses" , by Brunello Nortarmaro Dutton, ppublished by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Fibonacci2358 is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:07 AM
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StCirq has told you: "Al Vaticano" or "Vorrei andare al Vaticano". If there is more than one person, "Vorremmo andare al Vaticano".

Eloise is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:08 AM
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j9999, prendere un taxi is perfect Italian - who says it's not? Just google "prendere un taxi", and you'll get about 550.000 results, most of them being Italian hotels explaining how to reach them. Of course, you can say andare in taxi, as well, there's no difference.
kayd, andare in taxi o in bicicletta, ma andare a piedi.
Finally, StCirq has it right - "al Vaticano" is the proper way to tell the taxi driver where to go; noone would really say "vorremmo (that's the needed plural) andare al Vaticano", that's typical grammar book Italian nowhere to be encountered in real life. Btw, "vogliamo andare" is considered bluntly offensive - never use the indicative mode of volere unless you have to do entirely yourself what you want to! (E.g. voglio smettere di fumare, I want to stop smoking.) If anybody else is concerned, ALWAYS use vorrei/vorremmo, or he/she is going to be seriously offended!
franco is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:09 AM
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I think I'm not being clear, either. In Italian you don't say "Take me to the Vatican." Well, you could get complicated and use the reflexive mettersi or even portar in giro maybe , but why, when there are perfectly acceptable, easy alternatives.
StCirq is online now  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:09 AM
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Mi porta al Vaticano, per favore.

Portare is the correct verb to use in this context.
panecott is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:12 AM
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P.S. Yes, you could keep it simple and say, "Il Vatican"
panecott is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:13 AM
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Oops, "Il VaticanO"
panecott is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:14 AM
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Portare qualcuno al Vaticano, d'accordo.
But please: Mi porti al Vaticano - if you say mi porta, you'd have to be on first-name terms with the taxi-driver, and with a stranger, that's once again offensive - Italian is one of the languages having a polite form of address, like French or German...
franco is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:20 AM
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To be a bit clearer, and to sum it up, you say "prendo un taxi", "I'm taking a taxi" - to take and prendere are identical in this case. You DON'T say "take me to" by using prendere, you simply "al Vaticano, per favore", or if you want to say a whole sentence by all means, "mi porti al Vaticano".
franco is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:30 AM
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Personally, I prefer to use the polite "vorrei" instead of the imperative.
Eloise is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:40 AM
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This has always worked for me:

"Buongiorno (or whatever is applicable), andiamo al Vaticano per favore" (or whatever target) - "[Greeting] - Let's go to ...please" - usually I get a jolly "d'accordo" or "va bene" and we're off.

WK
WallyKringen is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:55 AM
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Eloise - don't be misled by "imperative"; imperatives doesn't sound nearly as imperative in Italian as they may sound for you. It's simply no "real" Italian if you say "vorrei andare..." - everyone understands, of course, but noone would likely say so in Italy. It is perfectly polite to use the imperative - in its polite form, of course (i.e. the imperative connected to the polite address - thus, say "mi porti" to a person whom you would address as "Lei"). To make that imperative even less imperative, you could add "per favore", or "per cortesia", or simply (as Italians would prefer to do) "grazie", but only following an imperative! So the alternative would be between "al Vaticano, per cortesia", and "mi porti al Vaticano, grazie". WK's version is very friendly and very nice, too.
franco is offline  
Apr 6th, 2006, 08:56 AM
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I'll never learn to use the PREVIEW function, my goodness!! Make it "imperatives don't sound", PLEASE.
franco is offline  

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