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Those Who Love London: Help a Novice Construct a Decent Pub Crawl

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Those Who Love London: Help a Novice Construct a Decent Pub Crawl

Old Oct 16th, 2003, 10:55 AM
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ChatNoir
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Those Who Love London: Help a Novice Construct a Decent Pub Crawl


With a deep sense of humility and strong desire for instruction, I submit the following proposed pub crawl for your review and comment. Info was gleened from previous posts on this forum:

Pub Crawl

First Stop: The Blackfrairs, 174 Queen Victoria St
Tube: Blackfrairs

Second Stop: Old Bell Tavern, 95 Fleet St
Tube: Blackfrairs/Chancery Lane

Third Stop: The Albert, 52 Victoria St
Good views of Westminister Abbey and pub grub for dinner
Tube: Victoria / St. James Park

Fourth Stop: Red Lion (Crown Passage)
Tube: Piccadilly
 
Old Oct 16th, 2003, 11:01 AM
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Save yourself a lot of trouble and ask Ben Haines for help.
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Old Oct 16th, 2003, 11:06 AM
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He did,poor man, and I blew him a raspberry. Please search for the correspondence First Time in London BH. So now with fortitude he is starting his own list. And very good too. So, it will be jolly good if Myer and others will contribute their idea (with street name) to the collection.

But it is nice to be thought omniscient.

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Old Oct 16th, 2003, 11:09 AM
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I couldn't find it by searching, but I put it in my London file, and thought I'd attach it to this thread.

Chat Noir, pub experts will have to comment more directly than I on your choices.

Here is the late, great, Wes Fowler's pub crawl
abridged--if anyone can find the original here, please post the url.
I"m assuming all the establishments mentioned are still there.

?You may be interested in the following pub walk: Here's a walk that covers four rather historic pubs in a relatively concentrated area. Take the tube to the Charing Cross station. Walk across Trafalgar Square to St. Martin's Lane. (It's between the National Gallery and St. Martin in the Fields church. At 90 St. Martin's Lane, you'll find The Salisbury Pub which dates from the mid 19th century and is notorious for the bare knuckle fights that were held there in that era. It's a stunning pub and you may find it filled with theatre people.

Leave the pub, cross
St. Martin's Lane and enter Goodwin's Court at 55-56 St. Martin's Lane. Goodwin's Court is a wonderfully authentic 18th century street. At its end turn left on Bedfordbury, then right on New Row, cross Garrick Street and continue straight onto Rose Street to 33 Rose, The Lamb and Flag
pub. This one is really old, being one of the few wooden structures to survive the Great Fire of
1666. It was once known as the "Bucket of Blood" because of all the fights that broke out in it. It
was also one of Charles Dickens favorite spots on his pub crawls.

Backtrack to
Garrick Street, turn left, continue down Garrick (which changes its name to Bedford) to The Strand and turn left again. Continue on The Strand to 91 The Strand and The Coal Hole pub. Now a popular refuge for theatre people, it got its name in the early 19th century from the coal haulerswho unloaded boats on the river and went there to restore themselves. Leave the pub, cross The Strand and walk straight ahead to Southampton Street. Walk up to Maiden
Lane, turn left and continue on Maiden Lane which changes its name to Chandos Place. At 51 Chandos Place you'll find the Marquis of Granby pub which dates to the 17th century when it was called "The Hole in the Wall" and run by a mistress of the Duke of Buckingham.

It's a friendly tavern which, like the others, attracts theatre people. Now backtrack on Chandos to Southampton, turn left on Southampton and continue up the hill to Covent Garden Market where you won't find any pubs of historic significance but you will find three pubs on the north side of the market, any one of which serves pretty good traditional pub food.
Remember that most pubs are of the self service variety. You order food and drink at the bar and pick it up yourself. Also, traditionally, bartenders are not tipped, but you can offer to buy him a drink.?
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Old Oct 16th, 2003, 11:10 AM
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those question marks started out as quotation marks
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Old Oct 16th, 2003, 11:14 AM
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ben, if I didn't know better, I'd think you set me up!

I drafted the crawl without consulting a tube map. First two are close, but can you get to the next two easily? Can you walk between the third and fourth stops?
 
Old Oct 16th, 2003, 11:20 AM
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elaine, thanks for the good info. That looks like an easy one to walk.

The Salisbury and Lamb and Flag were two that I had written down before for the Covent Garden area.
 
Old Oct 16th, 2003, 12:38 PM
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Thanks for your confidence. Look, it is past my bedtime, so shall we leave it till my morning, your late evening, when I shall see what other good ideas helpful people have added, and make a geographical string of it all ? It may yet turn into a two-day pub crawl, or better pub walk.

Ben Haines, London
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Old Oct 16th, 2003, 01:01 PM
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We did the Wes Fowler pub crawl when we were in London for the first time earlier this year. It was great and very easy to follow.
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Old Oct 17th, 2003, 03:35 AM
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Old Oct 17th, 2003, 06:44 AM
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Would any reader please improve the following note, which I take from Chat Noir s researches and from the entries under London Pubs on the search engine of Fodor s Forum. Clearly, to be useful the list needs to be short, so deletions are as valuable as additions. And does anyone recommend any of the last four ?

Chat Noir: When it is ready shall we call it Pub Walk, or Pub Crawl ?

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Old Oct 17th, 2003, 07:17 AM
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ben, please don't tease a young maiden. Where is this note that needs improvement?

Let's call it a walk - sounds more dignified.
 
Old Oct 17th, 2003, 10:56 AM
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Hi Chat - Haven't been to any of your places, to my recollection. On my last trip to London in May, I enjoyed a shandy at The Surprise, advertised as the oldest pub in Chelsea. It was within walking distance of the Physic Garden, if that interests you. The Surprise certainly looks old and has a cozy back room with comfy chairs and couches - probably intended for "the ladies." A bridal party showed up as I was leaving. Very "local." Liked it. On that day I stopped at two other pubs in Chelsea, but both had too much light and little ambience. I prefer to brood in the dark. Went to another by the British Musem, Museum Tavern, I think - too many tourists. I found pub tours on the internet but I couldn't get the dud I traveled with to appreciate pubs - she'd order water, complain about "wasting time," then pick up a beer at the convenience store and drink it in bed. Have fun on your adventure.
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Old Oct 17th, 2003, 12:12 PM
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I would heartily recommend a peek at www.fancyapint.com. Complete London pub listings, including directions and tubestations (the search feature by tube station proximity is an especially nifty option). If I remember correctly, they even recommend some crawls based on neighborhoods. I'll second the Lamb - a great place - and will kindly suggest to Ben that he promptly get himself cloned for the benefit of all London-bound, regardless of time zone.
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Old Oct 17th, 2003, 12:52 PM
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You may be walking at the beginning of the tour to these pubs, but toward the end of the list, if you're imbibing at each one, you certainly will be crawling.
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Old Oct 17th, 2003, 01:04 PM
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Hereis the list thatneeds yiur advice. Sorry tohave teased you.



The Prospect of Whitby, 57 Wapping Wall. Wapping tube.
Traditional pub with a small riverside garden, serving good food.

Dickens Inn. St Katherine?s Marina. Tower Hill tube. An 18th Century spice warehouse converted in the style of a 19th Century balconied two story Inn. It has two restaurants, a snack bar, and traditional tavern. The beer garden and restaurant balconies are open during the summer. A setting overlooking Tower Bridge and the Marina with its boats and walkways.

Hung, Drawn and Quartered. By the Tower. Interesting decor with a nice outside area. I am fascinated

The Blackfrairs, 174 Queen Victoria St. Tube: Blackfrairs. It s an absolutely beautiful place with good food at reasonable prices and a very friendly staff.

The Founders Arms, just downstream from the southern end of Blackfriars Bridge. Blackfriars tube. Good food, and views of St Paul s and the City

The Cartoonist, New Merchant Centre, New Street Square, north of Fleet St. City Thameslink station. Worth a look not for the pub but for the cartoons.

Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese, 15 Fleet Street. Blackfriars tube. Very old historic pub with good but cheap beer. Great atmosphere with several different rooms in which to have a drink and something to eat. Haven t tried the meals so I can t comment.

Old Bell Tavern, 95 Fleet Street. Blackfriars and Chancery Lane tube

Ye Olde Cock Tavern. 22 Fleet Street, London, EC4 1YA. Temple and Chancery Lane tubes.
Mock Tudor frontage, long bar full of Victorian woodwork with lovely classical style pillars on the bar itself. One of the most famous taverns in the City of London and the oldest in Fleet Street. Built originally in 1549. The upstairs Function Room is airy with a stained glass ceiling. Old prints cover the walls.

The Lamb and Flag, 33 Rose Street. Leicester Square tube. Wes Fowler: This one is really old, being one of the few wooden structures to survive the Great Fire of 1666. It was once known as the "Bucket of Blood" because of all the fights that broke out in it. It was also one of Charles Dickens favorite spots on his pub crawls.

The Coal Hole pub. 91 The Strand. Charing Cross tube. Wes Fowler: Now a popular refuge for theatre people, it got its name in the early 19th century from the coal haulerswho unloaded boats on the river and went there to restore themselves.

The Marquis of Granby pub. 51 Chandos Place. Charing Cross tube. Wes Fowler Dates to the 17th century when it was called "The Hole in the Wall" and run by a mistress of the Duke of Buckingham. It s a friendly tavern which, like the others, attracts theatre people.

The Maple Leaf, 41 Maiden Lane, Covent Garden. Charing Cross tube. This is not a historic pub, but great if you want to catch up on baseball or American football news. It shows several live games per week of all American sports (baseball, hockey, basketball, football - pro and pcollege).

The Salisbury. 89 St Martins Lane, Covent Garden. Leicester Square tube. Glittering cut-glass mirrors and old-fashioned banquettes, plus lighting fixtures of veiled bronze girls in flowing togas, re-create the Victorian gin-parlor atmosphere in the heart of the West End. Theatergoers drop in for homemade meat pie or salad buffet before curtain.
Wes Fowler: Dates from the mid 19th century and is notorious for the bare knuckle fights that were held there in that era. It s a stunning pub and you may find it filled with theatre people.

Gordon's Wine Bar, Villiers Street. Embankment tube

Red Lion, 48 Parliament St. Westminster tube

Lamb and Flag. 24 James Street. Bond Street tube

Red Lion. Crown Passage. Green Park tube

The Albert, 52 Victoria Street. St. James Park tube.
Good views of Westminister Abbey and pub grub for dinner

The St. George near Victoria Station. This discourages casual visitors.
Further down the street is the 'Greyhound'. It is for locals

The Grenadier. 18 Wilton Row, Belgravia. Hyde Park Corner tube. Arguably London's most famous pub, and reputedly haunted, the Grenadier was once frequented by the duke of Wellington's officers on leave from fighting Napoléon. It pours the best Bloody Marys in town, and filet of beef Wellington is always a specialty.
The nicest thing about it is the location - great neighborhood, and as a mews pub it always feels cozy and "undiscovered" even if it turns up in every guide book (and can be occupied almost exclusively by tourists some times.) I don't know about the Beef Wellington, but my recollection of the food there was it was okay, nothing special, but pricey. Mid-week afternoon on a warm day, though, not a bad place.

Perseverance, 63 Lambs Conduit Street, Holborn. Holborn tube
Excellent gastro Pub, but have not been in a while. Environment and atmosphere of traditional boozer.

The Union Tavern. 52 Lloyd Baker Street. Kings Cross St Pancras tube
Traditional Victorian Pub with gastro pub pretensions ie excellent food.
Scarsdale, 23a Edwards Square, Kensington. High St Kensington tube

Here are some old pubs in The City. Nobody has given an opinion on them.

Centre Page. 29-33 Knightrider Street, London, EC4 5BH. Blackfriars tube
Old, classic pub, wooden floor panelling. Restored recently and is now warm and light inside. Beer is served in pewter tankards. Traditional, fresh English food served.

Hand & Shears, 1 Middle Street, Cloth Fair, London, EC1A 7JA. Barbican tube
Small traditional pub behind City of London's oldest Church - St. Bartholomew's the Great and originally built in 1123. Rebuilt in 1849 the bar is central to a square wooden panelled room which is split into four and is occupied by a mix of medical and office workers. In Winter the open fires makes for a warm and friendly atmosphere where you can enjoy a quiet pint and good food while contemplating the 19th Century cartoons that are spread around the room.

Lord Raglan, 61 St Martins-Le-Grand, London, EC1A 4ER. St Pauls tube.
Victorian London Pub. Reconstructed in 1855 on top of the original cellars. It then became "The Lord Raglan" to commemorate Lord Raglan the hero and Commander in Chief ot the Crimean campaign. This pub itself offers a good selection of food, wines & beers in a relaxed atmosphere. The pub was often visited by Shakespeare and his friends

Ye Olde London, 42 Ludgate Hill, City, London, EC4M 7JU. Blackfriars tube.
Built on the site of the Ludgate Prison for debtors erected in 1377. In 1731, London's first coffee house opened here, then in 1872 the Ye Olde London was built. Refurbished in 1985 but kept the original facade. Inside are two bars with comfortable seats, bookshelves and a mews garden. Food on offer is traditional roast meats, daily specials with a grill counter where you can choose your steak or Fish & Chips and have it cooked whilst you watch.
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Old Oct 17th, 2003, 02:34 PM
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Alas, Ye Olde London Tavern is no longer it became The Bell Book & Tavern some time ago (at least 2 years). It is part of the Eerie Pub Co now - so the interior is very interesting
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Old Jul 31st, 2006, 04:01 PM
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ttt
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Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 03:10 PM
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Any updates, Ben?

Seems as if every visit to London becomes a nostalgic quest for my DH to find the pub of his dreams. That means darkish/traditional, no juke boxes or muzak, poker machines, games, or flashing lights... but good beer and food are a must. (As you see, he's easy to please! ;-) )
We have been in and out of soooo many pubs in this quest. Which is fun, I must say.
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Old Aug 2nd, 2006, 03:16 PM
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned

www.monopolypubcrawl.org.uk/
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