The European Take on California Wine

Jun 29th, 2001, 09:52 AM
  #21  
JB
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My French colleagues visit Washington, D.C. often and they always order Caesar Salad with Chicken. They say they can't get it in Paris and LOVE IT. We always go to a Mexican restaurant when they are here also as the Mexican here is so much better than in Europe. I had it once in London (right on Trafalgar Square) and, though it was not bad, there was something not quite right about it. Some other French colleagues turned their noses up at the Virginia wines we served but others loved them. Maybe it comes down to different people like different things - and sometimes what you are USED TO is what you like. I like French table wine, Virginia wines and California wines. WAIT - I just like WINE!
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 10:18 AM
  #22  
Dayle
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Reminds me of one of my favorite Tee Shirts: GOT WINE?
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 11:45 AM
  #23  
Susan O.
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Note to Sheila: you've confirmed for me that we are bringing the right gift to our Scottish relatives when we visit next week -- Ridge zinfandel. We wanted to bring them something that was truly California and they do enjoy red wine. Apparently the reds that are most available to them are from Chile so we hoped this would be a treat. Thanks for reinforcing it!
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 12:41 PM
  #24  
chuck
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Susan O,

On the subject of good California zinfandels, I just tried Rombauer's El Dorado zin (on the recommendation of a wine-shop owner). At $27 a bottle, it was more expensive than what I usually drink, but it was delicious.
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 12:57 PM
  #25  
Linda
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Lesley, I know this is the incorrect forum, but where in Vegas did you get the best Italian and Chinese food you have ever eaten? I live in Vegas and am always on the look out for good Italian and Chinese. Don't find many restaurants with true Italian. Usually it's Americanized or is really boutique with oregano. Sure would like to try your recommendations. If you'd feel more comfortable, feel free to e-mail me with the answers.
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 01:19 PM
  #26  
jen
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Ess,

You might find this little tidbit of information useful. I live about an hour away from Napa. On a trip during winter a few years back, I was fortunate enough to chat for a while with an owner who was doing his own pouring in the tasting room. He mentioned to me that the price of the wines might also have some relation to the cost of purchasing the land and starting the entire operation. I can't remember exactly how much an acre of land costs up there, but I do remember I almost dropped my wine glass when I was told. I'd imagine some of these wineries are carrying some pretty hefty mortgages what with the cost of the land and all the startup costs involved.
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 01:43 PM
  #27  
Sheila
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Susan O.

Your relative..do I know them? Do they take visitors?
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 01:49 PM
  #28  
Susan O.
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Sheila:

The Moultries near Castle Douglas and Kirkcudbright ... anywhere near you? Follow the nose of the zin... We're also hoping they'll share!
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 02:16 PM
  #29  
Sheila
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Bit of a long commute; about 270 miles


never mind; have one on me!!

Since you asked(?) we have a ritual tomorrow- the British Lions are playing the Austrailan Wallabies at rugby. A bunch of my pals are coming round to watch the game and drink Austrailian wine.

My husband has looked out 5 of the most impressive bottles of Shiraz you have ever seen. Only one is less than 14.5% alcohol and they're all old enough to leave their mammies. How much do I care who wins????
 
Jun 29th, 2001, 05:05 PM
  #30  
Ess
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Jen, I have been reading the same explanation - that land costs in California are exhorbitant, and I imagine it certainly is a factor. And as long as people are willing to pay $25 or more for a bottle of california wine, where's the profit in making available a range of $12 bottles, at least from those large companies whose wine is available to us on the east coast. Not that you can't get inexpensive wine here from CA, but I mean of an equivalent quality to same priced foreign wines. As I said above, I'm no expert at ALL, I was just making an observation. But I envy your living where you do - you probably get all kinds of wonderful CA wines that we would never see here! Treats for you!
 
Jul 2nd, 2001, 04:11 AM
  #31  
Claudia
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I am Italian, and I've lived for one year and a halk in New York, I've also been 2wks inf SF, then in New Orleans, Boston, Washington.
I am aware that the US is the most varied country in the world, and it pretty hard to define a typical American meal, except maybe for the Traditional Thanksgiving dinner (that I adore, of course it's not an everyday meal).
In cities like NYC and SF going out for dinner is a unique experience: first you have to choose what kind of f
 
Jul 2nd, 2001, 04:35 AM
  #32  
Claudia
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I am Italian, and I've lived for one year and a halk in New York, I've also been 2wks inf SF, then in New Orleans, Boston, Washington.
I am aware that the US is the most varied country in the world, and it's pretty hard to define a typical American meal, except maybe for the Traditional Thanksgiving dinner (that I adore, of course it's not an everyday meal).
In cities like NYC and SF going out for dinner is a unique experience: first you have to choose amomg thousands places, you have to book and then wait at least half an hour for your table. For me it's worth the experience. I think I had the best steak in NY. In SF i enjoyed the recent mix of American-Japanese cuisine which is now typical of upscale californian restaurants. In Boston I had a marvellous (and cheap!) lobster in a small Chinese restaurant.
I love Californian wines, expecially the oak aftertaste of Californian Chardonnay but now that i am back in Italy I drink them very rarely: they're too expensive compared to Italian and French wines produced just a few miles from here.
One thing really struk me among the U.S. habits: wine&cheese.
In Europe we usually have wine&cheese at the end of the meal (not an everyday meal). The average coupling is cheese and a white wine.
In the US wine&cheese is a pre-dinner event, and people dring mostly red wine, eat cheese and peppers with hummus.
To reply to your question:
I loved what I found. I was horrified by prices expecially because of the crisis of EURO. I've not experienced much "pretentiousness". Sometimes I've snickered behind the backs of the ones going to Italian restaurants offering "fettucini Alfredo".
 
Jul 2nd, 2001, 06:30 AM
  #33  
Sheila
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The person who has just sent me two bottles of Ridge (you know who you are) should consider himself thanked; but with an ill grace.

I help folk because I want to- even if I do really ike the wine- so please will y'all stop sending me things!!
 
Jul 2nd, 2001, 07:38 AM
  #34  
Travelodge man
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Julie made me do it. Honest!
 
Jul 2nd, 2001, 11:19 AM
  #35  
Kavey
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Hey!!

I only post here in the hopes someone will send me chocolate!!!!!

(Kidding

/<avey
 
Jul 2nd, 2001, 12:58 PM
  #36  
Sheila
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Since I got home my husband wants me to post list of all Californian wines we like; we could do it in price order if you like

(Only kidding too!)
 

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