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The European Parliament voted to end visa-free travel

The European Parliament voted to end visa-free travel

Old Mar 5th, 2017, 05:26 AM
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This is a link to a November EU Commission press release which if I read it correctly, states in more detail the future plan of the EU regarding travel of Visa exempt tourists. This. as others have pointed out, has been in the works for a long time. As another poster said, the OP is referring to a vote by Parliament with the power to change the current procedure resting with the EU Commission.

http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-16-3674_en.htm
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Old Mar 5th, 2017, 07:27 AM
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***"the "rationing" of fruit and vegetables has absolutely nothing to do with Brexit and everything to do with appalling weather in southern Europe. All northern European countries have experienced shortages of one sort or another as a result "***
In Spain we have been ok, yes prices for vegetables (so has meat) have gone up but no empty shelving here.
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Old Mar 5th, 2017, 01:12 PM
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ribeirasacra, that is because you greedy Spanish have been hoarding the courgettes, according to the Daily Mail.

We had plenty of courgettes, and other out of season veg, but missed out on some more exotic salad leaves. No great loss in February.
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Old Mar 5th, 2017, 08:12 PM
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Hetismij2, I wrote, "Not that I believe it is connected to Brexit at all but as a side note on things we would all find hard to believe, have you heard about the rationing of fruit and vegetables in the UK?


You wrote, "Dogeared the "rationing" of fruit and vegetables has absolutely nothing to do with Brexit and everything to do with appalling weather in southern Europe."

What has what you wrote got to do with what I wrote pray tell? I did not suggest any connection to Brexit, in fact I clearly said the opposite.
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Old Mar 5th, 2017, 08:54 PM
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Why did the US refuse to drop the visa requirement for those countries? Anyone know?

And I think I'm once again confused about the EU and Schengen. What does one have to do with the other? Because I know Iceland isn't part of the EU but is part of Schengen...so I thought it was the Schengen visa waiver that counted not anything to do with the EU. Thought EU was mostly working rights and monetary system?

It would be interesting to know how many people this would really effect. Most of the people I know in "real life" don't go to Europe more than once. They don't go to NYC, for that matter. Both beyond the budget of many folks. A dive in NYC hotel prices would probably help domestic tourism, as a matter of fact. The people who really want to go to Europe will apply and get the visa, but those are the people who would regardless, whether it's a trip in a lifetime or a jaunt to see family. It would likely effect someone like me- I'd be less inclined to just buy a plane ticket, and if I need a VISA, well, there are plenty of places on my bucket list that I need a VISA for anyway- not in Schengen.

These days, I seem to meet a lot of travelers from countries that the US requires Visa. So I'm not even sure Europeans are the majority in US tourism income. If it means fewer crowds at the national parks during the summer, I'm all for it otherwise, it seems like useless saber rattling as mentioned above. And if they do implement it, it will just cause the US to require visas for all schengen countries, so I think the risks might outweigh the reward there anyway.
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Old Mar 5th, 2017, 11:43 PM
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never quote the Daily Mail. You are only spreading irresponsible information.
https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/09/...ns-daily-mail/


Spaans? Ik, zei de gek.
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Old Mar 5th, 2017, 11:49 PM
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Spaans? Ik, zei de gek.

Didn't know that one.

Waar komt die uitdrukking vandaan ?
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 12:00 AM
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I suspect the issue is not about how hard it is to fill in your basic visa form, but more the point that
1) the USA already has a reputation of agreeing stuff in negotiation and then failing to deliver their side of the deal, once the other side has changed its legislation
2) the EU has a mind set that all people in the EU are equal, while in the US they see some are more equal than others
3) Within many countries there is confusion about where the EU stops, where the EURO stops, where Shengen stops and where the single market stops. It isn't easy

I suspect this "noise" is just a push back on (1)
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 07:31 AM
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The EU and Schengen are indeed separate things.

It is the EU Commission that is committed to having to impose a visa requirement if the US does not allow visa free entry to the 5 EU countries currently required to have a visa, by the end of April.

The EU Commission do not have any choice in the matter. They will have to impose a visa requirement UNLESS either the EU Parliament or EU Council direct them not to.

That's why the vote by the EU Parliament last week matters. Obviously, if they have voted already on the issue, they are not going to tell the Commission not to impose the visa requirement. That leaves only the EU Council as a possible means of stopping the visa requirement from being imposed.

So it may be 'sabre rattling' but I would say it is pretty serious saber rattling.

Marvelousmouse, the Schengen visa would be required if a US citizen wanted to visit a Schengen member country like France for example. But if someone wanted to visit a country that is an EU member but not a Schengen member country. Those are, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania and the United Kingdom.

So let's say you wanted to visit the UK or Ireland and France. You would need to apply for both a Schengen visa to visit France AND a UK visa to visit the UK. Or apply for an Irish visa if you wanted to visit Ireland.

If you limited your travel to only Schengen countries you would only need to apply for the one visa which is still a pain but if you also had to apply for a second or even a third visa, it becomes a real pain.

Your comment about how many people it would affect indicates you are using a very limited view of the subject. There are thousands of people who visit Europe repeatedly for vacations and then there are the business travellers who also visit repeatedly. They would be applying for visas over and over again.
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 08:03 AM
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The United States deals with each country involved as a sovereign nation, but the EU wants the US to treat them like subdivisions of a nation that doesn't exist (the EU isn't a nation). This has been in the works for a long time and has nothing whatsoever to do with the current occupant of the White House.

Tourist travel isn't likely to drive this decision--it's business travel that will truly be inconvenienced. Most tourism is planned in advance, so while applying for a visa might put off some tourists, or prompt them to go elsewhere, business travel, which is often not planned that far in advance, would be impacted the most. I don't think either the US or the EU want to get into a fight that seriously impacts business travel between the major countries--I don't see German and French businesses wanting to be inconvenienced for the sake of their Polish compatriots/competitors, which would be the result of the EU imposed visa restrictions for US travelers and the US retaliated by imposing visa requirements for all EU countries.
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 08:07 AM
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Thanks for the explanation. Still not sure if I understand though. You're saying it wouldn't be a visa for every country- it would just be a visa for all of Schengen, plus a separate one for each EU country not in Schengen? That doesn't sound as bad as I thought, although it would depend on the visa application process.

My point was that the people who repeatedly vacation there would apply and go anyway. By effect, I don't mean filling out visas- I mean a change in behavior, like choosing not to go. Or, in broader terms, the percentage of Americans who repeatedly visit Europe. "Thousands", after all, is still a very small portion of the population.

Another question- the business visitors don't already fill out visas? I thought the non visa time spent in Schengen only applied if you were there for tourism purposes. If it's a business trip, they're working, and I would have thought that required a visa.
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 08:29 AM
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I'm concerned about this as well, since we'll be traveling to Italy this summer. My question is: we have a connecting flight in London. We're not going out of the airport during that time, just changing planes. Will we be going through customs in London? And if so, would we need a visa for that leg of the trip, too?
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 08:41 AM
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Many business trips are "non-working", e.g. going to conventions, trade fairs, etc. Las Vegas, for example, gets tons of this business tourism. You are also not working abroad when you just go there to negotiate a contract, deal, whatever.

The end of visa-free travel would not necessarily mean that visas were very expensive or time-consuming to apply. You could think of some eVisa schemes of countries like Australia which are no more bureaucratic burden than the US ESTA procedure for "visa-free" travel.
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 08:58 AM
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WoinParis, my mother's woom ;-)
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 09:34 AM
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Ah, yes. The good old days before passports were invented. By Henry V. In 1414.
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 12:48 PM
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The headline that started all this kerfuffle was WRONG:

"The European Parliament voted to end visa-free travel"

No it didn't - we are being fed some "fake News"...

So why is everybody getting so excited?
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 08:18 PM
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The title was wrong but the European Parliament did vote. That means they have already decided not to tell the Commission to not implement a visa requirement for US citizens if the US Government does not allow visa free entry for the listed EU countries michelheubeli. That leaves only the EU Council to possibly object.
If the EU Council do not object, the EU Commission MUST impose a visa requirement.

If they impose it within 2 months of the end of April, that means it could start to affect US travellers to Europe by July. Then you have people like hiho322 above, who is left wondering if it will affect them if they have to transit through the UK. They might need 2 visas.

Marvelousmouse, you may be in the habit of planning your travel months in advance and not object to having to apply for a visa. But you represent just one segment of travellers. You need to think about other people and how they might travel, not just yourself. What about people who like to do things more spontaneously? I once decided to take my wife to Geneva, Switzerland for a 4 day Valentine's present. I just happened to come across a very good airfare to Geneva and so I booked it. I booked it on February 12th and we flew on the 13th. You remember which date Valentine's Day is on right. If you need a visa, you can forget spontaneous.

It is not time for anyone to panic yet. The USA has until the end of April to allow visa free travel for the named countries. The USA is not the only country that had to deal with this. Canada and several other countries, also did not allow them visa free travel when they first joined the EU, but they moved to an agreement to do so and have since done so. The USA is now the only one that has not.

People planning to travel from the USA to Europe do need to be aware of this however and that it could affect them as early as this summer if it does happen. So they need to keep an EYE on what is happening.

Everybody is getting 'excited' michelhuebeli but they would be foolish to ignore it.
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Old Mar 6th, 2017, 11:55 PM
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hiho, no. Unless you are joining a cheepo airline, which I doubt. If you are staying with a full international flight then you stay the right side of customs and never enter the UK for visa purposes.

But that will not change under these concerns and your own airline should be able to advise you.
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Old Mar 7th, 2017, 12:57 AM
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Airlines are never responsible for advising anything about visa rules. They will always tell you it is your responsibility to ensure you have the correct entry requirements. They only check the credentials before you board, they don't offer advice. And there is such a thing as a transit visa which might be necessary if you are changing airports.

> Customs? This must mean immigration surely ie follow the Flight Connections signs unless you are changing airports.

Since many visas are now obtained online, the process might not be as lengthy or complex as imagined. There are different types of visas, single entry, multi entry for those who book today and go tomorrow.

Years ago when UK citizens always used to have to get a US visa (pre visa waiver days and ESTA), it was stamped in your passport and in many cases had indefinite validity and was for multiple entries. When that passport expired, you just carried the old passport with the visa with the new one. It was never a problem to book a last minute flight to the US if you had that type of visa.

At least there is some heads up that there could be visa rules implemented - some countries don't even bother to inform anyone of changes.
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