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The Euro is coming.....what are your thoughts?

The Euro is coming.....what are your thoughts?

Old Sep 10th, 2001, 10:00 AM
  #1  
elaine
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The Euro is coming.....what are your thoughts?

Among my traveling friends I have a number of differing opinions... most are glad to think they will be relieved of the burden of having to figure our new coinage and currency rates when traveling to different European countries, but frankly, I will miss that! It was always part of the fun for me - the unfamiliar coins that you had to stare at and pick through on the palm of your hand in order to pay for a sundry item (while the clerk waits patiently and points to the right ones)and doing the calculations in your head when considering buying some exotic foreign souvenir (or just saying the hell with it, I want this and don't need to know the exact price in US$!!) I loved getting the colorful bills like Monopoly money, although that probably made them way to easy to spend. But I suppose the ease of conversion will be really nice in the long run. I'm just glad I'm going to Italy this month and not on January 1st. Thoughts?
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 10:18 AM
  #2  
kate
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The euro will still be foreign money to you, so what's the problem? It'll just be euros instead of Liras.
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 10:23 AM
  #3  
Ursula
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elaine: Don't worry. The Euro bills are just as colourful as the Monoply bills. Incidentally, they are very nice. Don't ask me about other consequences. For people living on borders to other European countries, it's definitely very convenient. Most of my family members live in my hometown Basel and do cross the borders to France and Germany very often for shopping, pleasure, etc. For some, it will be convenient, for others not. From what we hear over here, a lot of people are still not aware what all that change will involve. Prior to this summer's holiday season, travellers were advised to use up their foreign moneys (sp?) while visiting involved countries, to give them away or to change them before the Euro will come. <BR>What is means for Switzerland, the UK and the other countries not involved, their economy and tourism, is still a most discussed topic. <BR>Well see.... <BR>Enjoy your trip to Italy and do spend all your Lire! .. a last gelato at the airport, maybe?
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 10:33 AM
  #4  
Chris
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Kate, the Euro replaces lira, francs, etc. The Euro will be foreign, but the joy, mystery, frustration and confusion you get from dealing with each country's money will be lost, as will some of each country's history. Think of it as not having Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, etc., on US dollars -- it loses "identity". <BR> <BR>Ursula and Elaine, as much as I'll miss the different monies, I am looking forward to having money that's valued closer to the dollar and not worrying about changing dollars, finding ATMs, spending the last remaining coins or bills so I don't wind up with more than "souvenier" money!
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 10:55 AM
  #5  
dan woodlief
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From a practical standpoint I suppose it will be good, especially if traveling to a number of countries during one trip. Still, as a person who loves history, foreign nuances, and has dabbled in currency collecting now and then, I hate to see it in another way. I too am glad I am going to Italy this year Elaine to experience the fun of dealing with all those lire.
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 11:56 AM
  #6  
Myriam
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<BR>Dan, I'm glad to 'meet' another human being thinking exactly the way I do. I feel so sorry for the historical value of all these European currencies. To me it is like a piece of our own history is disappearing. <BR> <BR>Ursula, I live on the Belgian/Dutch border and I often go shopping in the Netherlands (as well as in Germany), so from a practical point of view it will indeed be easier but I will miss the Dutch Guilders and the Deutsche Marken in my special purses.
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 12:01 PM
  #7  
Ursula
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Miriam: Yes, I agree about the historical value in a way. <BR>But did you have the change to see the Euro bills? They look indeed nice, different colours too and quite small and handy. I always find it very difficult in the US. All the bills look the same. <BR>Vive les couleurs!
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 12:06 PM
  #8  
Myriam
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<BR>Ursula, I've seen the bills and they look indeed very good and very up-to-date! We will have to get used to it, if we want it or not.
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 12:09 PM
  #9  
Ursula
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Good luck, Miriam. You will manage it! <BR>Just spend your foreign currencies before the big day! Christmas shopping? <BR>I'll take my remaining FF to Paris in December! ;-)
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 12:17 PM
  #10  
Jen
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I will miss the surprise of getting a really good exchange rate in one country versus another when my credit card bill arrives. <BR> <BR>I will miss seeing different countries coins in my change purse for weeks after a trip. <BR> <BR>I will miss asking my husband in every store "how much is this in USD?" - he's much better then I am at calculating in his head. <BR> <BR>I will miss checking out all the different currencies when I exchange USD for them the first time... <BR> <BR>Call me old fashioned (at the age of 31), but I do love the franc and lira, and will miss them.
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 12:24 PM
  #11  
mikey
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Not that it makes up for the historical differences, but at least one side of each euro coin will have designs that change from country to country.
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 12:26 PM
  #12  
elvira
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As an American who is used to thinking in dollarworths, the Euro is a blessing. British pounds have always been easy because the number of zeros is the same (1000 or $1000 - chunk a change), but other currencies are out of range (1000BF is NOT a chunk a change). The Euro uses the same number of zeros as the USD! And for those long layovers in an intermediate airport, no need to change "some money" into the local currency to buy a paper or a coffee... <BR> <BR>A concern I had was for the blind - I remember that Dutch paper money was punched in Braille, but I understand the Euro currency will have raised places for just those reasons. <BR> <BR>I am going to miss the French franc paper money with its lovely collection of artists and notables, but the Euro is pretty snazzy... <BR> <BR> <BR> <BR>
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 04:36 PM
  #13  
Shanna
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Elaine, I agree with you. I'm going to miss the differences - and the craziness and confusion, but when I travel somewhere I want it to be different. Germany isn't Italy and I WANT THE ITALIAN MONEY!!!! I think Lira says "Italian" and doesn't pound just sound English? Seeing my francs will always conjure up the memories of France - seeing the Euro, well, I'm afraid the connection just won't be made. It's the end of an era and it's sad to me.
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 11:22 PM
  #14  
Millennium
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GET OVER IT!!!
 
Old Sep 10th, 2001, 11:35 PM
  #15  
Euro Lover
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You people sound pathetic. What crybabies you all are. Get a life! The Euro makes perfect sense!
 
Old Sep 11th, 2001, 12:55 AM
  #16  
Myriam
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If you look at it only from a commercial point of view the Euro would make perfect sense but only if EVERY European country would participate ... which is NOT the case! If you go to the United Kingdom, to Scandinavia or to the Balcan countries you will still need local currency and pay exchange rates. And this makes no sense at all. Unification of Europe? Forget it!
 
Old Sep 12th, 2001, 03:18 PM
  #17  
Patrick
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But it still greatly reduces the number of different currencies necessary if one is traveling through a number of countries. Isn't that better that nothing, Myriam? If we had 50 different currencies in the US, one for each state, I suppose you would be against half of the states joining together to use one common currency. Your attitude would be there are still 25 currencies which is no better than 50?
 
Old Sep 12th, 2001, 07:00 PM
  #18  
sandy
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I was in Europe three times in the last year, each time for three weeks, each time visiting a number of different countries. While I sympathize with those who feel a certain "something" will be lost, I also realize that the realities of living in a global economy have brought changes to our lives that may be less visible, but are no less disturbing .However, I'm tired of shaking my fist at a world that is going off in a direction that I'm not so crazy about, and I'm ready to embrace the practicality, the sheer utilitarian pleasure, of not having to change money every time I cross a border. Vive l'euro!
 

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