Ten things NOT to do in Italy

Old Jan 4th, 2015, 07:59 AM
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bilboburgler, I had to google that and found some fairly horrendous pics. Don't know the answer, sorry.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:18 AM
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when we were staying in a gite in rural France once, i had to do an emergency run to the local supermarket to buy DS a pair of "speedos" because all he had with him were bathing trunks. the pool [a public one] was very strict about that, but didn't care if we wore bathing caps or not. I know that they insist on the fitted style for "hygiene' reasons, but without being indelicate, I've never really worked out what those reasons might be!
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:21 AM
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bilboburgler, annhig, are you telling me bathing trunks are not allowed in France? Whyever not? I must remember never to go for a summer holiday in France then.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:36 AM
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Having passed 100 replies I hope the moderators will allow me a quick off-topic post.
I have the impression that some of the regulars belong - like me - to a mature age group. I came across this quote from a Chinese philosopher, Lin Yutang, who wrote in the 1930s:

“Isn't it enough that old people just be?
Is it necessary that they always do something?
The loss of the ability for otium in maturity is already very bad, but in old age it's a crime against human nature".

I remind my wife about that every time she tells me to get up off my ..... and go and dig the garden.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:37 AM
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certainly in the public pools that I've been in, only fitted 'speedo" types are permitted for those of the male sex. the loose trunk style is not permitted for reasons of hygiene, whatever that may mean.

you have been warned!
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:39 AM
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Appia, yes they are not allowed in pools though no problem in the sea.

I think Frenchmen used to wear long baggy underwear and they wanted to stop those same men just dropping their trousers and wading in.

So in Italy you can wear baggy shorts and a skull cap to go swimming.

In France skinny shorts and no cap.

Where does Monacco sit in the budgie subject?
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:40 AM
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Oh dear! And I favour the almost knee length bathing shorts. I wonder what they mean by that.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:46 AM
  #108  
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Sorry bilboburgler, you beat me to it with your explanation.

I see on the Italian version of Yahoo there is a question as to whether bald men have to wear bathing caps. Opinion seems divided.
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 08:51 AM
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"the loose trunk style is not permitted for reasons of hygiene, whatever that may mean".
They don't want people to swim in the same clothes they've been wearing to walk around.
It happens !
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Old Jan 4th, 2015, 10:13 AM
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Ann, re your comment looking for cheap eating houses in Venice, and locals to direct you to same.

Try Casin de Nobili in Campo San Barnaba. I would not say really cheap, but decent food at reasonable prices.

And give Caroline a big hug from Lou and me please.
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 01:30 AM
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thanks, Peter. I think that you count as a venetian local.

Adding to my list.

I will certainly pass your message onto Caroline, if i manage to see her.
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 07:26 AM
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<the waiter/waitress (please don't ask me to call them servers) >
Appia, I've seen this comment from you a couple of times, and I believe you are laboring under a misconception. "Server" is not a derogatory term, at least not in American English. Many professional servers prefer the term, actually, because it is unisex. Sure, it's kind of changing "happy" to "glad", but it's akin to using "flight attendant" instead of "steward" or "stewardess". I've never understood why those terms are now considered almost offensive, but usage changes...
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 07:45 AM
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Newbe, a guess a couple of issues, a "server" is a tool for serving a dish from. In US English it is also a waiter. Some people don't like to think of a waiter as a tool. Though I used to have a friend who we called "gimlet" which is a small boring tool.

Brit English does not use the term server as a person.

I suspect one of these issues will be a trigger.

Appia?
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 07:50 AM
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<Brit English does not use the term server as a person.>
I didn't know that, but certainly the connotation of person as tool is there, which is why I have no idea why the term has taken hold in the US, I only know that it has. Safer, then, to stick with "waiter", because it works equally well in the US and overseas?
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 08:32 AM
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Yes.

Though I get a bit thrown in German as one normally calls out Frauline (miss!) to get a waitresses attention which is all very well but if she is over 60 it sounds a bit odd.
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 08:36 AM
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Does anyone ever call out "waiter"? [or "server" come to that]

I find that a well-timed 'excuse me" does the trick.
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 09:01 AM
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Only in desperation Ann

Mrs Bilbo hates that I never ask for the bill but just waggle one hand on another (works all over Europe).

You finished you trip report yet? ;-)
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 09:57 AM
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oh yes, Bilbo, the outmoded cheque writing mime. Funny it still works though none of us write cheques any more.

Which one?
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 10:42 AM
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Funny, I always thought that pantomime was meant to signify the waiter (!) writing up the bill--which they don't do any more, either, of course
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Old Jan 5th, 2015, 11:20 AM
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Who cares, where do you get a good burger in Italy.
_______

I never ask for the bill in Italian, it sounds so politically incorrect in English.
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