Subway Sandwiches

Jun 15th, 2002, 10:02 AM
  #21  
Tim
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Hey Fattie R. Buckle, if you think that the bread at Subway is great, then I'm glad I don't eat at your "custom" sandwich shop. While they may bake it "fresh" (actually from frozen blobs they have sent to them) it is all virtually the same white processed fluffy bread with different "flavors" sprinkled on top so that they can claim they offer a whole bunch of different types of bread.
 
Jun 15th, 2002, 11:43 AM
  #22  
Earl
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Yes we must admit that America perfected the art of sandwich. Which is why you always see Americans stuffing their faces with one, occasionally even whilst driving a car. Sometimes they gobble those things up so quickly you wonder how they don't lose a finger or two in the process.
 
Jun 15th, 2002, 01:24 PM
  #23  
Doug Weller
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One interesting difference between American sandwichs and British ones is the general lack of butter on American ones.

In the UK Subways are not made of fluffy white bread sprinkled on top. The last one I had in the US wasn't either. Sure, you can get better sandwiches, Mange Pret in the UK does great sandwiches, in fact so does Boots, with things like mango bread, etc.

Doug
 
Jun 16th, 2002, 08:13 AM
  #24  
amy
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Pret a manger is only good if you don't mind sandwiches that have gotten soggy from sitting for hours. Yes, they are made fresh every day, but I can't stand the sogginess, would much rather get a sandwich made fresh.
 
Jun 17th, 2002, 08:08 AM
  #25  
Oh,Please
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Whether the bread dough is frozen or not, who cares? It’s kind of like sausage, I’m really only interested in the end result and, again like sausage, I not only don’t CARE about the details, in some case I actively don’t want to know the details.

Bread, cheese, wine, who the hell cares about the details, I’m not making the stuff, I’m TASTING it. As the old adage goes, “the proof is in the pudding”.

As an aside, I’ve won umpteen chili cook-offs, including two nationals. I make it all like a traditional American Indian stew (which is what chili is, not Mexican necessarily). My finished product takes about 4 hours from start to finish.

I have a friend who makes chili in half an hour or less, fresh ground beef and everything else from a can. It’s as good as any I’ve had. In cooking the end truly justifies the means.
 
Jun 17th, 2002, 08:13 AM
  #26  
Hoagie Grinder and Hero, too
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Some of the "Subway" bashers have probably not been there since Quizno's and Schlottsky's started giving them a run for their money -- the bread is much improved over a few years ago, but they still dig their "roasted chicken" out of some brackish brine, and who knows how long the "seafood salad" has been sitting there.

I'll take Quizno's anytime (we don't have a Schlottsky's nearby yet).
 
Jun 17th, 2002, 08:41 AM
  #27  
Jean Valjean
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Instead of a Subway sandwich, stop at a shawarma or kebab shop.

In Spain you can find Bocatta and Pans & Company. Great sandwiches on crusty bread.
 

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