Storm damages Burgundy Vineyards

Reply

Jul 24th, 2013, 11:00 AM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 41,402
Storm damages Burgundy Vineyards

Some lost 70% of their crop.

http://www.french-news-online.com/wo...#axzz2ZzFsvwX0
cigalechanta is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 24th, 2013, 11:20 AM
  #2
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,267
This happens absolutely every year and is sensationalized by the press each time. In the end, it turns out that maybe 2% of the vineyards were affected since the severe storms are extremely local, and the harvest and resulting wine are totally normal with the same quantity and (hopefully) quality.
kerouac is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 24th, 2013, 12:32 PM
  #3
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 67,512
Just could it be an over reaction like kerouac hints at - IMO perhaps to boost the prices before harvest and curing? Order your best Bourgogne wines now?
PalenQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 24th, 2013, 12:39 PM
  #4
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,267
No, that doesn't work because nobody knows yet how the harvest will turn out for the unaffected grapes. You have to wait at least until mid-August for the producers to start predicting how they think the crop will be depending on the alternating rain and sunshine as the grapes ripen.
kerouac is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 24th, 2013, 03:37 PM
  #5
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 41,402
Several reports say there is much damage Not an over reaction.
cigalechanta is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 25th, 2013, 03:07 AM
  #6
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 2,630
It was very local, we didn't get much water in Dijon and around so it is bad luck for the vineyards. More details on our local newspaper http://www.bienpublic.com/cote-d-or/...B-F1357F8CBB0D
cocofromdijon is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 25th, 2013, 03:38 AM
  #7
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 14,990
Up to 70% on some estates. I think I know what that means.

The last big damage was 2003 in Sancerre. There the grapes were damaged and the plants/buds scoured back to destroy next year's (2004) crop as well as that year's (2003). I cannot see from the article what the individual plant level damage is.

The other thing about Burgundy is the shear smallness of some of the holdings. If you own 20 vines (and some of the great wines are made up of loads of small parcels) and the storm tears out your 20 vines then you have no wine for 5 years or so that any negociant will buy.
bilboburgler is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 25th, 2013, 09:41 AM
  #8
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 41,402
I heard from someone in Burgundy whose friend lost 80% the last storm which is usually with hail. He said losts of depression after these storms.
cigalechanta is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 25th, 2013, 09:51 AM
  #9
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,267
The articles mention damaged "slopes." There are thousands of slopes/parcels of vineyards. Some of them can be completely destroyed and not have much effect on the overall crop.

Yes, if the slope belongs to just one producer, he is out of luck if he doesn't have insurance (and most of them don't). Farming has always worked that way in every country in the world. And the other farmers will say how sorry they are while rejoicing that they will make more money off their own production.
kerouac is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 27th, 2013, 03:31 AM
  #10
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 565
The Financial Times ran an article to day about the hailstorm in Burgundy and the damage done to crops. The FT has a paywall, so I won't link the article, but the damage to the crops was significant.
stevewith is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 27th, 2013, 03:55 PM
  #11
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,256
I'm planning a trip to visit some of the wine areas around Beaune and saw the report of the damages suffered near Pommard as reported at the Bloomberg.com website.

"Damage affected 30 percent to 70 percent of vines in southern Pommard and 70 percent to 90 percent in the north. In Beaune, 10 percent to 90 percent of vines were hurt, with no plot left untouched"

The report also said the area hasn't had a full harvest since 2009.

Now I'm wondering what the Pommard and Volnay vineyards will look like when we are there in September. I certainly hope many recover and that there aren't more damaging weather before they can harvest their grapes. Deborah
DeborahAnn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 27th, 2013, 07:52 PM
  #12
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 6,929
There's always California, Australia, and South Africa.
tomboy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Jul 28th, 2013, 03:51 AM
  #13
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,267
I'll drink a glass of cheap red from Languedoc to your health.
kerouac is offline  
Reply With Quote
 



Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:39 AM.