Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Stena Line ferry rail/ferry overnight option London to AMS -- seasick?

Stena Line ferry rail/ferry overnight option London to AMS -- seasick?

Old Jan 20th, 2010, 11:53 AM
  #1  
kit
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,492
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Stena Line ferry rail/ferry overnight option London to AMS -- seasick?

My travel group is considering this mode of transportation the first week in May. I've been seasick before -- both on a cruise ship and on an offshore fishing boat. Am I crazy for considering this? Something about the sleeping thru it part makes me feel like I could handle it. And I always recover quickly once we alight.

Are there any other tips -- high floor/cabin vs. low floor, etc. It sails at 23:45 so a window wouldn't do me much good...thanks in advance
kit is offline  
Old Jan 20th, 2010, 12:15 PM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 8,351
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
They use big stabilised ships. It is doubtful you will be sea sick on one, but there is always a small chance of a storm in the North Sea - very very small chance in May.
An inside cabin is actually better if you are seasick as they do not pitch and roll as much as outside cabins do.
I use the ferry to Hull and that is a longer journey but I never feel the movement of the boat.
You can see the boats they use, with plans and even a virtual tour of them on the Stenaline website.

I would pre book dinner on board but not bother with breakfast. You can grab a cup of coffee and have breakfast when you get to your destination - it gives you a tad longer in bed
hetismij is offline  
Old Jan 20th, 2010, 12:30 PM
  #3  
kit
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,492
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thank you, hetis. Inside cabin -- makes sense. Yes, the website is very good -- and there is a huge write-up about it on seat61, so I think I'm in good shape.

Just hoping not to get seasick!
kit is offline  
Old Jan 21st, 2010, 12:01 AM
  #4  
hsv
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 2,801
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Also mid-ship will usually roll less than towards the bow or stern.
hsv is offline  
Old Jan 21st, 2010, 04:52 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 5,129
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
These are big ships: over 780 ft long and around 45,000 tons. It's very unlikely you'll feel any motion. The cabins are very good.
In my experience, there's no point in catching an early train to Harwich because you'll only have to wait in the ferry terminal. The connecting train normally leaves London Liverpool St at 2038 and gets to Harwich after ten o'clock. You therefore need to have an early dinner in London or a late one on the ship.
GeoffHamer is offline  
Old Jan 21st, 2010, 10:30 AM
  #6  
kit
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,492
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks, all...it does look just like what I need. I still fear seasickniss. I have been sick on a Carnival Cruise boat, so anything is possilbe. (I have also been sick on small craft...but never on a sail boat -- strange.)

IS anyone aware of a prescription to help with motion sickness? I can do some research, just wondering if there is anything out there someone swears by.

Again, thank you.
kit is offline  
Old Jan 21st, 2010, 10:44 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If you get seasick you can be seasick on anything - including the largest cruise ships. You should assume you will be and medicate accordingly. Being asleep won't help - since seasickness is not a function of your mind but your inner ear.

I - and many hundred other people - were violently ill on an overnight ferry (12 stories high) between Oslo and Copenhagen.
nytraveler is offline  
Old Jan 25th, 2010, 11:50 PM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,698
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The ships are huge and rock steady. My wife is Dutch and we use them all the time all year round even in the depths of winter, with our two kids in a 4-berth cabin.

You board early (from 21:00 if you take the 19:15 from London, see www.seat61.com/Netherlands.htm) and it doesn't actually sail from Harwich till 23:45. By this time we're already asleep and don't even notice the ship leave. Next thing you know, they're announcing breakfast in the restaurant and arrival at Hoek van Holland in an hour's time. It seems to take no time at all!

It's easy. If there's any hip you won't get seasick on, this is it.
Man_in_seat_61 is offline  
Old Jan 26th, 2010, 08:46 AM
  #9  
kit
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,492
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thank you, Man, but I just don't think I should risk the ferry. I always think I can hack it, and then I get sick and am beyond miserable. If I got sick on a Carnival Cruise Line boat (it was enormous!), I feel like I'll probably get sick on the ferry. I have been sick on a boat more times than I can count, but never want to miss the fun. It always starts out all right...then turns very, very bad after about an hour...
kit is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
sallyky
Europe
12
Jul 14th, 2013 10:28 AM
Ricardo_215
Europe
4
May 8th, 2012 12:01 AM
Debbie
United States
4
Sep 20th, 2002 09:26 AM
lee
United States
8
Aug 17th, 2002 09:55 AM
marc
United States
5
Jun 3rd, 2002 09:55 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Do Not Sell My Personal Information